Arup Architecture

Architecture, Chelsea, condos, Green Design, New Developments

475 West 18th Street, 475 West, Chelsea development, SHoP Architects, wooden buildings, wood construction

In March, an Austrian architecture firm announced plans to build the world’s tallest wooden skyscraper in Vienna. They noted that by using wood as opposed to concrete they’d save 3,086 tons of CO2 emissions. Then, a study showed that timber buildings actually cost less to build. These benefits really must have stuck with SHoP Architects, who are developing plans for a ten-story residential building in Chelsea, overlooking the High Line at 475 West 18th Street, that will be made entirely of wood, according to the Wall Street Journal.

SHoP’s project came via a competition hosted by the United States Department of Agriculture, in partnership with the Softwood Lumber Board and the Binational Softwood Lumber Council, that asked architecture firms to design buildings at least 80 feet tall that employed wood construction technologies. SHoP’s design, dubbed 475 West, won the competition along with a 12-story building in Portland. The firms will split a $3 million prize to “embark on the exploratory phase of their projects, including the research and development necessary to utilize engineered wood products in high-rise construction.”

More on the project here

Financial District, Major Developments, Transportation

Fulton Center, Fulton Center oculus, Grimshaw Architects, James Carpenter

Fulton Center via Grimshaw Architects

It’s a busy couple of weeks for the Financial District. On Monday, Condé Nast moved in to One World Trade Center, and this coming Monday, November 10th, at 5:00pm, the Fulton Center subway station will finally open.

The new station, which connects ten subway lines, was first conceived in 2002 as part of downtown revitalization efforts following 9/11, but also because the station had needed improvements for decades. It was initially supposed to open in 2007, but funding hurdles and escalating costs delayed the progress. More recently, Hurricane Sandy and systems testing problems pushed back the opening further. But the $1.4 billion transit hub is now ready to welcome commuters and dazzle them with its giant 120-foot-tall oculus.

Take an advance look inside Fulton Center