art

Art, Transportation

Yayoi Kusama, “A Message of Love, Directly from My Heart unto the Universe, 2022.” Photo by Kerry McFate ©YAYOI KUSAMA Courtesy of Ota Fine Arts, David Zwirner

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority last week unveiled new permanent floor-to-ceiling mosaics at the soon-to-open Grand Central Madison terminal, adding to the impressive and expansive public art portfolio found across New York City’s transit system. The glass mosaics designed by renowned contemporary artists Yayoi Kusama and Kiki Smith animate the new terminal, which when it opens later this month, will bring Long Island Rail Road service to Grand Central Terminal.

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Featured Story

Art, Features, Harlem, Manhattan, NYC Guides

Located at the northern end of Manhattan, Harlem has long been an important hub of culture and creativity. From the Harlem Renaissance to today, the area holds a critical place as a historic center of African American culture. It has been home to famous residents such as Zora Neale Hudson and Langston Hughes, brought together iconic artists including Josephine Baker and Duke Ellington, and remains at the heart of New York’s artistic community. Though Harlem has changed as gentrification creeps north, there are still many cultural anchors that retain the historic soul of the neighborhood. From dance and jazz to museums large and small, here is an art lover’s guide to Harlem.

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Art, maps, Policy

Screenshot of Map courtesy of HueArts NYC

HueArts NYC, a coalition of over 400 New York City arts groups founded, led, and serving Black, Latinx, Indigenous, Asian, Pacific Islander, Middle Eastern, and all People of Color (POC), launched an interactive digital map and directory of the city’s POC-led arts and culture landscape. The map accompanies a report with key findings and recommendations for the city’s policymakers and arts donors to address the city’s cultural equity gap, including a call to create a $100 million fund to support POC-led arts groups.

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Featured Story

Art, Brooklyn, DUMBO, Features, NYC Guides

Top right photo: Cey Adams’ “Love” mural; Photo courtesy of Dumbo BID

Dumbo, “Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass,” is a highly Instagrammable neighborhood that also happens to boast world-class art and cultural attractions. Once a manufacturing hub full of abandoned warehouses, Dumbo is now a vibrant area that is one of Brooklyn’s biggest draws. With newfound popularity buoyed by an influx of galleries, creative spaces, and public art, this former no man’s land has been refashioned into the height of cool.

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Art, Financial District

All photos: NYC Parks / Malcolm Pinckney

A 16-foot-tall steel and fiberglass sculpture of a superhero has been installed at The Battery in Lower Manhattan. Designed by artist Hebru Brantley, the artwork, called The Great Debate, is part of a series featuring the character Flyboy, an aviator goggle-wearing, crime-fighter. The sculpture will be on display through November 13, 2022.

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hudson yards

Vessel by Thomas Heatherwick, Hudson Yards public art, Heatherwick Studios, NYC public art

Thomas Heatherwick’s 150-foot-tall, honeycomb-shaped climbable public art installation at Hudson Yards is set to open for public climbing in March along with the complex’s Shops and Restaurants on March 15. Known for some time as “The Vessel,” the bronzed steel and concrete structure has no official title as of yet. As for the former moniker, a Related representative told 6sqft in an email, “It was always a placeholder until the public experienced it. We’re excited to have the public help us with a name.”

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Art, maps

Nonstop Metropolis, Rebecca Solnit, Joshua Jelly-Schapiro, maps, new york city, san francisco, new orleans, art, cartography, books, Infinite City, Unfathomable City, Rebecca Snedeker, Harlem, Staten Island, Trash Map, Commuter Map

When writers and artists–particularly ones who have a keen understanding of cities–venture into the world of maps, you can bet the results will be fascinating and illuminating. “Nonstop Metropolis,” a new atlas by Rebecca Solnit and Joshua Jelly-Schapiro (6sqft recently discovered the “City of Women” subway map from the book) offers 26 New York City maps that “cue us into understanding who is here” according to Solnit. As Wired puts it in their review, the result is “a diverse array of deeply particular maps” that combine imaginative and fanciful imagery with the colorful cultural history beneath the city’s diverse neighborhoods and landmarks and the people who live among them.

Check out some fabulous maps

Featured Story

apartment living 101, Art, Features, NYC Guides

10 Imaginative and Inexpensive Ways to Frame Your Favorite Art

By Andrea Zlotowitz, Tue, October 13, 2015

cheap ways to frame art

6sqft’s new series Apartment Living 101 is aimed at helping New Yorkers navigate the challenges of creating a happy home in the big city. This week we take on framing artwork for the home without spending a lot of money.

If you’re familiar with 6sqft’s post 10 Great Places to Buy Affordable Art in New York City, then you’re probably now considering framing your new acquired artwork. Whether you are trying to get something framed, or you have a collection of frames just lying around, knowing how to approach the framing process will help make sure that your home decor and your efforts are on point. From where to find great frames on the cheap to creating your very own DIY editions from materials bought at your local hardware store, 6sqft has rounded up some inventive and inexpensive options to help you decorate your walls.

Start framing here

Daily Link Fix

daniel root, east village, vintage photography, nyc, new york city, east village in 1980s
  • The East Village 30 Years Ago – Laughing Squid featured photographer Daniel Roots’s collection of photos comparing the ones he took in the 80s to the ones he took this year. See how much the nabe has changed in just 30 years.
  • What It Means To Be “Local” – Mashable sent one of its writers to follow a peach from Freshkills farm to Union Square’s farmers market. Explore the journey local foods go through to get to your hands.
  • Hail A Cab The Second You Raise Your Hand – We feel your pain. Watching every taxi drive by with its light off is a frustrating feat, especially when you’re in a rush (which is why you’re taking a cab in the first place right?!). Gothamist wrote about NYC Taxi Viz, an innovative website that maps out where taxi are most likely to be taken and empty at any given time and place in the city. Spoiler alert: you’ll never find an empty cab in Chelsea around 6pm on a weekday. Your best bet is to walk west and downtown to around 8th and 17th.
  • A Self-Portrait Made From The Artist’s Blood – Well that’s pretty self-explanatory, but yes, Dezeen says the Brooklyn-based artist hooked up an IV to a CNC machine that used his blood to make a nude self-portrait. Pretty resourceful, we guess…

Daily Link Fix

the jewish book council, jewish literary map, jewish literature map, jewish landmarks in nyc, nyc landmarks, infographic
  • A Detailed Map of Jewish Literature: Take an adventure through the city and schlep to these landmarks found in Jewish literatur. See the full map on Tablet.
  • Google Street View With Sound: Because as if Google Street View isn’t creepy enough, one company decided to add sounds to certain scenes like pigeons flying overhead, street performers and babies crying. FastCo.Design spotlights how they were able to mimic the difference in sound when you got closer to or further away from a scene.
  • Would You Pick Up A Hitchhiking Robot?: hitchBOT has his (her? its?) thumb up hoping for a caring stranger to stop and help him make his way across Canada. Daily Dot reports that the robot can only answer basic questions. So I guess it won’t be singing along to Journey with you.
  • Derek Jeter Head Corn Maze: To commemorate #2’s final season, a New Jersey farm decided to make a corn maze in the shape of Jeter’s head.  Gothamist says you can make your way through the the Yankee’s face starting September 20th.

Images: Sample of the Jewish Literary Map by The Jewish Book Council (left); Jeter head corn maze courtesy of Gothamist (right)

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