ArchDaily

Architecture, ideas from abroad

Metsä Wood, Empire State Building, wooden skyscrapers

Courtesy of Metsä Wood

Back in March, an Austrian architecture firm announced plans to build the world’s tallest wooden skyscraper in Vienna, noting that by using this material instead of concrete, they’d save 3,086 tons of CO2 emissions. The news launched a lot of musings from the architecture community on the benefits of wood construction versus steel or concrete. A new story, originally published on ArchDaily by Patrick Kunkel, takes a look at whether or not the Empire State Building could have been built with timber.

Michael Green has teamed up with Finnish forestry company Metsä Wood and Equilibrium Consulting to redesign the Empire State Building with wood as the main material. The project is part of Metsä Wood’s “Plan B” program, which explores what it would be like for iconic buildings to be made of timber. Their work shows that not only can wood be used to produce enormous structures in a dense urban context, but also that timber towers can fit into an urban setting and even mimic recognizable buildings despite differences in material.

Read the rest here

Architecture, Design, Interiors

WORKac, Weiden + Kennedy, ArchDaily, building of the year 2015, boty 2015, interiors winner, archdaily interiors winner

Interiors winner WORKac’s Wieden+Kennedy NY © Bruce Damonte

The votes are in, and the people of the architecture and design community have spoken. ArchDaily has announced the winners of its Building of the Year 2015 contest. The winners of the 14 categories included NYC-based firm WORKac’s Wieden+Kennedy NY headquarters for Interiors (which have been featured on 6sqft before), Herzog & de Meuron’s Arena do Morro for Sports Architecture, and OTO’s Fogo Natural Park Venue for Cultural Architecture. Congratulations!

CHECK OUT ALL THE WINNERS…

Architecture, holidays, Starchitecture

architecture holiday cards, frank ghery middle finger

© Juan Martinez Gonzalez

Giving and getting holiday cards is always fun, but every so often you’ll receive one that really gets you giggling. This year, be the person handing off clever cards to your friends and family. ArchDaily has just announced their 2014 Holiday Card Contest winners, and for all of you design-minded folks and architecture nerds, they’ve got plenty of punny—and just downright cool—cards to choose from.

get the cards here

Featured Story

Architecture, Design, Features, Transportation, Urban Design

© NYCDOT via photopin cc

NYC is well on its way to becoming a bike-friendly city. With Citi Bike expanding and designs for bikes of all shapes and sizes growing in popularity, it’s only a matter of time before we start seeing architecture built specifically for cyclists’ use. In his article, “10 Points of a Bicycling Architecture”, originally published on ArchDaily, Steven Fleming explores ten ways major cities, like New York, can make this happen.

A revolution is occurring in street design. New York, arguably the world’s bellwether city, has let everyday citizens cycle for transport. They have done that by designating one lane on most avenues to bicyclists only, with barriers to protect them from traffic. Now hundreds of cities are rejiggering to be bicycle-friendly, while in New York there is a sense that more change is afoot. Many New Yorkers would prefer if their city were more like Copenhagen where 40% of all trips are by bike. But then Copenhagen wants more as well. Where does this stop? If you consider that we are talking about a mode of transport that whips our hearts into shape, funnels many more people down streets than can be funneled in cars, has no pollution, and costs governments and individuals an absolute pittance, you won’t ask where it stops, but how close to 100% the bike modal share can possibly go and what we must do to achieve that.

It’s a beautiful day for a bike ride

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