9/11

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Missing 9/11 flag returns to Ground Zero site after 15 years

By Metro New York, Thu, September 8, 2016

september 11 ground zero flag

Photo: Thomas E. Franklin

The American flag seen in the iconic photo of the firefighters at ground zero on 9/11, which mysteriously went missing only hours after it was raised, has been found and will be displayed in a museum forevermore.

Thomas E. Franklin, the photojournalist who took the photo for The Record newspaper, had heard a few years ago that the flag had gone missing but did not know what to make of the mystery. “I thought that was odd and unfortunate,” Franklin told Metro on Wednesday. He said he is glad for the people for whom it has special meaning that it’s was found.

READ THE FULL STORY AT METRO NEW YORK…

Daily Link Fix

tree, Cleveland Callery pear tree, 9/11, ground zero, national septemeber 11 museum and memorial
  • Summer Streets Is Here!: Time to break out the bike and ride the open roads. Summer Streets closes down streets in Brooklyn and Manhattan for biking, zip-lining, running, yoga and other activities. Find out where to find the annual program at The New York Times.
  • LGBT Barbershop Coming To Crown Heights: DNAinfo reports that hair stylist, Khane Kutzwell, plans to open a barbershop that also doubles as a safe space for LGBT to come, hang out and get a haircut in a non-judgmental atmosphere. Click through to read more and help fund her Indiegogo campaign.
  • A Tree Grows in Ground Zero: Narratively’s short video tells the moving story of one Cleveland Callery pear tree that refused to be broken when it was buried in the rubble at Ground Zero.
  • Would You Live In Damien Hirst’s Community?: Because once you’ve done it all, what else is there to do? The richest living artist is now planning an eco-community in the British country. Find out how not sustainable this project is over at PSFK.

Images: left – Video screenshot from Narratively; right – DNAinfo

City Living, Downtown Brooklyn, People

Downtown Brooklyn's Halal King himself

One of the saddest things I heard in the immediate aftermath of 9/11 was told to me by the wife of an acquaintance. She said, with a smug sense of pride, that her family — in an act of patriotic protest to the recent attacks on America — would be ending their long-standing Thanksgiving tradition of serving assorted meat and vegetable pies from Damascus Bakery on Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn. It was a heartbreaking statement of staggering stupidity, offensive on so many levels, not the least of which was personal.

I lived next door to Damascus Bakery in my first Brooklyn apartment. This was before Barney’s, Urban Outfitters and Trader Joe’s arrived. It was when that section of Atlantic Avenue was overwhelmingly Arabic, and I frequented the eateries as often as I could, feasting on delicacies from the Middle East, learning some geography and culture and a little Arabic along the way. And, of course, I met many wonderful people, including the family who owned and operated Damascus Bakery.

Read the rest of Andrew’s story here

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