Search Result for architecture firm

Featured Story

Vote for 2014’s Building of the Year!

By Diane Pham, Wed, December 17, 2014

building of the year nyc 2014

There is no shortage of towers on the rise in Manhattan, but amongst these glass and stone beauties are a handful that stand head and shoulders (and several hundred feet) above the rest. A red hot real estate market and cutting edge building technology have paved the way for towers of both unprecedented heights and prices. But worthy of equal credit are the visionary developers and architects who dare to change the NYC skyline.

Here we’ve handpicked 12 of the most newsworthy buildings of 2014; these towers boast groundbreaking designs and record-breaking (or soon to be record-breaking) prices. But we ask you: Out of the dozen, which deserves the title “Building of the Year?” Cast a vote above to help us decide which is 2014’s most important tower!

Extended by popular demand… Voting ends TODAY, December 12th at 11:59 PM WEDNESDAY, December 17th at 11:59 PM and we’ll reveal the winner on Friday, December 19th. And if you’re still torn between two (or all), jump ahead for the low-down on each, from height to 2014 news highlights.

More on each of the buildings here

Stereotank, Heartbeat, Times Square, NYC public art

As New Yorkers, we don’t really think of Times Square as a romantic location, but for Valentine’s Day 2015 we might just stand corrected.

Brooklyn-based architecture firm Stereotank was announced as the winner of the annual Times Square Valentine Heart Design contest, a public art competition held for the past seven years by the Times Square Alliance and the Architectural League of New York. Stereotank’s HEARTBEAT installation is an interactive, heart-beating, glowing urban drum.

More on HEARTBEAT ahead

WXY Studio Architecture + Urban Design, dlandstudio, QueensWay, Friends of the QueensWay

It looks like the city is one big step closer to getting its second elevated park. DNA Info reports that the state has just allocated nearly $444,000 to the design of the first phase of the QueensWay, an urban renewal project that would transform 3.5 miles of abandoned elevated railway into a park akin to the High Line. The money was awarded to the Trust for Public Land via Governor Cuomo’s $709.2 million Regional Economic Development Council initiative. The first phase will consist of the design of the “Northern Gateway,” which comprises a 1.5-mile-long stretch starting at Rego Park. The park is set to extend from Rego Park to Ozone Park.

Find out more here

Park Slope’s Iconic Pavilion Theater May Go Residential

By Ondel Hylton, Mon, December 8, 2014

Pavilion Theater, Architecture Outfitt, Movie Palaces, Brooklyn theaters, Prospect Park, Park Slope Historic District, Park Slope

Images on the website of architecture firm Architecture Outfit reveal that Park Slope‘s historic Pavilion Theater at 188 Prospect Park South may go residential. The theater is currently owned by a consortium led by Ben Kafash who purchased the theater from Morristown, NJ-based Cinedigm in 2011.

One scheme shows a six-story residential building rising behind the theater’s sublime Moorish façade and from a neighboring lot just south of the theater. It conceptualizes a mix of apartments along the circle dubbed Bartel-Pritchard Square and contextually scaled townhouses along narrow 14th Street. The second scheme preserves the theater in its entirety and limits new construction to the neighboring lot at 190 Prospect Park West where a nondescript one-story building currently stands.

More information here

Andy Warhol Museum

The Andy Warhol Museum via nooccar via photopin cc.

Since 1994, the 88,000-square-foot Andy Warhol Museum has been one of Pittsburgh’s main attractions, the largest museum in the country dedicated to a single artist. And though Warhol was born in Pittsburgh, he spent most of his formative years in New York City, a fact that has sparked plans for a satellite museum on the Bowery.

In Miami for Art Basel, museum director Eric Shiner told The Observer last night that the Lower East Side museum would be 10,000 square feet and part of the controversial Essex Crossing development. Its anticipated opening is 2017.

More details here

Chelsea Townhouse, Archi-Tectonics, gut renovation, glass skylight, garden extension

The renovation of this beautiful West Side property was made possible by the design team from Chelsea‘s very own respected architecture firm, Archi-Tectonics. This project included the addition of  a garden extension, two floors, and a rooftop terrace. The client, who is a fashion designer, wanted the home to reflect a “textured” or layered approach in its design, and the cool, narrative style does just that.

The contemporary renovation was completed in 2011, when the original 3,400-square-foot brownstone–also a New York City landmark–was extended by 550 feet with the addition of the new garden space to create a residence that was light and airy.

Take a look at the rest of the house

Featured Story
NYC scene

That’s the question that we’ve been asking 6sqft’s friends and Twitter followers leading up to Thanksgiving. It’s easy to get pulled into the NYC complaining vortex (The 6 train is delayed again?! You’re raising my rent how much?!), but the reality is that we live in the greatest city in the entire world, and there’s plenty here to be thankful for, whether it’s something as small as seeing a cute dog on the street or as large as visiting famous museums.

Read the responses we got here

One Vanderbilt Avenue by kpf and sl green

Recently at the Municipal Art Society’s 2014 Summit for NYC, James von Klemperer, FAIA , a principal at Kohn Pederson Fox & Associates, briefed the audience with new details on the architecture firm’s upcoming supertall project known as One Vanderbilt.

In case you haven’t been paying attention, the 68-story, 1,514-foot zigzag building is expected to become the tallest office tower in Midtown and third tallest in the city behind One World Trade Center (1,776 feet to spire tip) and Extell’s Nordstrom Tower (1,775 feet to spire tip).

Check out all the new images of the supertall tower here

An exclusive condo tower is set to rise within the quickly changing area where Midtown East‘s commercial bustle tempers down into the elegant residential blocks of the Upper East Side. Located at 118 East 59th Street near Park Avenue, the unassuming site is being developed by Hong Kong-based Euro Properties, their first foray into the Manhattan market.

The mid-block tower will soar 38 stories yet contain only 29 units–another example of the city’s new and somewhat oxymoronic building type, the boutique skyscraper, which typically contains fewer units than a standard six-story co-op building, and even fewer inhabitants. This 59th Street project will join the ranks of 432 Park Avenue (1,398 feet/104 units), 520 Park Avenue ( 781 feet/31 units), and 125 Greenwich Street (1,375 feet/128 units) as buildings with the greatest height-to-unit-count disparity.

More on the tower here

Featured Story
Neue Atelier, Best & Company, Design + Development, Chip Brian, interior designers nyc, builders nyc, design/build nyc

Chip Brian may look like he’s all business, but he’s a builder and a Californian with an inclination for all things sustainable. The founder of Design Development NYC (DD), Best & Co. and a new and experimental venture called Neue Atelier, Chip has managed to build a creative empire that, luckily for his busy clients, is a one-stop design/build shop that brings architecture, renovation and furnishings under one roof. We recently stopped by his Long Island City space where he gave us the grand tour of the studio.

Inside the studio here

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS

Thank you, your sign-up request was successful!
This email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Please provide a valid email address.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.