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Cool Listings, Soho

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , February 26, 2020

Photo credit: Rise Media courtesy of The Corcoran Group

This former photographer’s studio and residence at 49 Howard Street is the kind of classic Soho loft that we don’t see too often these days. Comprised of 1,800 square feet of open space, the loft checks all the boxes: 11-foot tin ceilings, hardwood floors, oversized windows , exposed brick and industrial pipe shelving frame the third floor walk-up condominium unit, available to rent for $6,500 a month. You don’t have to be an artist to live here, but your art will look right at home if you happen to be one. And unique interior features–like a bronze soaking tub and stone infinity sink–keep things interesting.

Eyeful of industrial loft goodness, this way

Featured Story

Features, History

  • By Lucie Levine
  • , February 26, 2020

Squatters Colony, Red Hook Recreation Area, September 12, 1934, Courtesy of NYC Parks

Today, New York City’s rising cost of living has made affordable housing one of the most pressing issues of our time. But long before our current housing crisis–and even before the advent of “affordable housing” itself–Depression-era New Yorkers created not only their own homes, but also their own functioning communities, on the city’s parkland. From Central Park to City Island, Redhook to Riverside Park, these tent cities, hard-luck towns, Hoovervilles, and boxcar colonies proliferated throughout New York. Ahead, see some amazing archival photos of these communities and learn the human side of their existence.

Lots more history and photos

Art, Bronx, Events, More Top Stories

  • By Alexandra Alexa
  • , February 26, 2020

Yayoi Kusama in 2020. Photo courtesy of the artist.

Opening May 9th and running until November at the New York Botanical Garden, a blockbuster exhibition dedicated to Yayoi Kusama will immerse us in the Japanese artist’s visionary world through a career-spanning survey, the debut of four new works, and a variety of complementary horticultural installations created by the Garden’s team. Tickets went live to the public at 10am today, and because NYBG expects such high traffic, they’ve shut down their regular website until 11:45am. Be prepared to wait in a virtual queue until it’s your turn.

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Art, Events, Museums

  • By Alexandra Alexa
  • , February 26, 2020

Photo (cropped) by Alex Proimos via Wikimedia Commons

The Metropolitan Museum of Art has announced two new sculpture commissions to be installed in the museum’s facade niches and the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Roof Garden later this year. Mexican artist Héctor Zamora will create a site-specific intervention on the roof titled Lattice Detour that’s set to open on April 21. On September 9, American artist Carol Bove will unveil new sculptures in the building’s Fifth Avenue facade niches, becoming only the second artist to activate the building’s exterior in this way. The works are still in progress but Sheena Wagstaff, the Met’s Leonard A. Lauder Chairman of Modern and Contemporary Art, hinted that Zamora’s piece will “invite us to reconsider the panoramic view of the city skyline” and Bove’s installation will feature “colorful stylized abstractions.”

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Cool Listings, Nolita, Soho

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , February 25, 2020

Photo credit: Michael Weinstein Studio courtesy of The Corcoran Group

For a mere $14,500 a month, you can rent the style, space, and service of a bygone era in this princely pad in downtown Manhattan’s iconic Police Building at 240 Centre Street, complete with fancy furnishings, two bedrooms, two baths and 1,400 square feet of space. The landmarked Beaux-Arts cooperative at the confluence of Soho, Nolita, and Little Italy is known for its history, its opulent architectural flourishes, and for the impeccable level of service provided for residents.

Chandeliers and Chinoiserie, this way

Art, Events, yorkville

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , February 25, 2020

All photos by Michael Appleton/NYC Mayor’s Office

A new art exhibition is open at Gracie Mansion, the fourth and final installation of Mayor Bill de Blasio and First Lady Chirlane McCray’s tenure. Catalyst: Art and Social Justice, which will also be the largest ever hosted at the historic home in Yorkville, features more than 75 works created by over 50 artists since the 1960s. With a focus on inclusion, the exhibit explores the connection between art, justice, and the social change movements behind it all.

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Transportation

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , February 25, 2020

Images courtesy of MTA/Flickr

In an effort that has long been in the works, the MTA is making strides in the modernization of New York City’s antiquated subway system. Following the recent retirement of its Nixon-era R-42 trains on the J and Z lines, the agency announced today that it is in shopping mode for as many as 949 new subway cars with an open gangway configuration–shown in prototype renderings–for use on the Lexington Avenue line. The move comes as the agency prepares for a major resignaling project on the 4, 5, 6 lines and plans to retire its 30-year old R62 and R62A fleets.

More new NYC Subways, this way

Celebrities, Hamptons, Recent Sales, Soho

  • By Alexandra Alexa
  • , February 25, 2020

2623 Montauk Highway. Photo credit: Chris Foster, courtesy of Compass

It’s been a busy 2020 so far for Real Housewives of New York alum Bethenny Frankel, who’s finally unloaded two properties: her Soho condo and one of her Hamptons retreats. The Post reported last week that Frankel sold her seven-bedroom residence in Bridgehampton for $2.28 million after listing it for $2.99 million. It’s a good thing she made a slight profit there because her Soho condo ended up selling for a significant loss. After almost three years on the market, Frankel sold her two-bedroom apartment at 22 Mercer Street for $3.65 million, the Observer reported last month. That’s a $550,000 loss compared to the $4.2 million she paid for the pad in 2014—and more if you factor in what she spent on an extensive renovation.

Check out both residences

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apartment living 101, Features, Green Design, Shop, Top Stories

The 10 best plants for apartment dwellers

By Rebecca Paul, Tue, February 25, 2020

  • By Rebecca Paul
  • , February 25, 2020

Photo by Brina Blum on Unsplash

From purifying the air to making your apartment feel more welcoming and alive, there are a multitude of reasons to incorporate plants into your home decor. However, for many of us, keeping these precious specimens alive can be a small but legitimate challenge—especially when space and natural sunlight is limited (like many apartments in New York City). To make the commitment to caring for and sustaining the life of greenery a bit easier, we’ve put together this list of special and very sturdy plants perfect for apartment dwellers like yourself.

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Midtown West, real estate trends

Apple signs lease for four floors at 11 Penn Plaza

By Michelle Cohen, Tue, February 25, 2020

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , February 25, 2020

Streetview of 11 Penn Plaza, Map data © 2020 Google

After the Post first reported speculations of the deal in January, they now report that Apple will lease four floors of space at 11 Penn Plaza. Sources told the Post that the tech giant became interested in the 1.15-million-square-foot building that stretches along Seventh Avenue between West 31st and 32nd streets across from Madison Square Garden after losing out to Facebook on a spot in the Farley Building. However, those with knowledge of the deal say that Apple has only signed a five-year deal, which may suggest that they are still keen on finding a larger, more permanent home in NYC.

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