Search Result for lot-ek

134 North 10th Street, williamsburg, condo, corcoran

This 624-square-foot, one-bedroom condo at 134 North 10th Street in Williamsburg offers the best of both worlds in a small amount of space. A recent reno restored details of the historic townhouse building, like six-inch-wide plank pine flooring, built-in closets, and decorative fireplaces. But the renovation also created an efficient, flexible layout with custom build outs that include shelving, desks, sliding doors, and lofts. After last selling in 2010 for $441,090, this blend of old-meets-new is on the market asking $775,000.

Take a look around

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Ada Tolla and Giuseppe Lignano

After completing architecture school at Universita’ di Napoli, Italy, Ada Tolla and Giuseppe Lignano fell in love with New York City, deciding in 1995 to establish an innovative firm in Manhattan called LOT-EK. Early experiments in the art world grew into a substantial architecture practice, but their philosophy has always been the same: Both Ada and Giuseppe are focused on a concept they call “up-cycling,” taking existing objects and elevating them through art, design, and architecture. The firm has done its most innovative work re-using shipping containers and received a wave of attention this year for a Brooklyn residential project that utilized 21 shipping containers in surprising, stunning ways.

The firm has just released its second monograph, LOT-EK: Objects and Operations, a photo-heavy showcase of dozens of projects the firm produced around the world over the past 15 years. “LOT-EK is a design practice that believes in being unoriginal, ugly, and cheap,” the book states. “Also in being revolutionary, gorgeous, and completely luxurious.” With 6sqft, co-founder Giuseppe Lignano talks about the early days of running a firm and waiting tables in 1990s New York, explains the firm’s philosophy behind sustainability and re-use, and discusses the inspiration behind their notable Williamsburg project.

This way for the interview

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Top 10 can’t-miss events for NYC’s Archtober 2017

By Michelle Cohen, Fri, September 22, 2017

Archtober is New York City’s annual month-long architecture and design festival of tours, lectures, films, and exhibitions taking place during October when a full calendar of events turns a focus on the importance of architecture and design throughout our city in everyday life. Organized by the Center for Architecture, in collaboration with over 60 partner organizations across the city, the festival raises awareness of the important role of design and the richness of New York’s built environment. Now in its seventh year, Archtober offers something for everyone—from the arch-intellectual who wants to talk Jane Jacobs to the armchair architect with a thing for skyscrapers, parks or historic buildings—in the 100+ event roster. Ahead, 6sqft has hand-picked 10 don’t-miss highlights in this year’s program.

Learn about the architecture of NYC at these cool events

BFDO, Barker Freeman, East Williamsburg rowhouse

Yes, you heard that right–the architects characterized this East Williamsburg townhouse renovation as having “a mullet strategy” of a “business/historically correct approach in the front and a party/modern attitude toward the back.” The architects, BFDO, were tasked with restoring the facade of a historic wood frame house, while also modernizing and expanding it. The result? A pleasing blend of older historic details with a brightness and openness not often on display in a Brooklyn townhouse.

Check it out

While we’re used to seeing headline-stealing buildings from innovative design firm SHoP ArchitectsBarclays Center, the American Copper Buildings, and what will be Brooklyn’s tallest tower, to name a modest few–we don’t see SHoP-designed townhouses every day. This particular two-family home at 87 Dikeman Street in the heart of creative and laid-back Red Hook has at least four bedrooms and consists of an owners’ triplex and a rental unit plus a garden and off-street parking. But it’s the home’s design that will likely attract the most attention, with an exterior comprised of zinc panels juxtaposed with polar white concrete planks and accented by a hardwood slat screen and full-height peerless windows. This 3,080-square-foot home, its innovative design–and design pedigree–can be yours for $3.15 million.

Tour this unique Brooklyn home

This four-unit, 19th-century townhouse at 52 South 6th Street isn’t your average Williamsburg dwelling, if only because 19th-century townhouses are the exception in the trendy north Brooklyn neighborhood. This particular home, however, didn’t get the memo and awaits with sunny interiors, gardens, and a waterfront spot where–according to the listing–you can watch the boats on the East River from your front porch, all for $4 million.

See what’s happening in the garden

O'Neill McVoy Architects, Clinton Hill, Townhouse, Architecture, Courtyard, Skylight, Carriage house, interiors

A thoroughly transformative re-design by New York studio O’Neill McVoy Architects turns a historic red brick townhouse on a slender 24- by 76-foot lot in need of light and air into an ultra-bright and inspiring modern residence for a young family. The Clinton Hill Courtyard House, in a landmarked section of the neighborhood, was built in 1877 as a carriage house for the mansion next door. The historic integrity of the home’s exterior was left intact, but inside, three strategic openings–including skylights, a central courtyard, and a perforated interior stair wall–were created to let in light and air everywhere for daily living.

So much sunlight, in so many creative ways

Weekly highlights: Top picks from the 6sqft staff

By Dana Schulz, Sat, February 18, 2017

Carroll House, LOT-EK, shipping containers, williamsburg, design,

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Images: Via LOT-EK (L); via Douglas Elliman (R)

Carroll House, LOT-EK, shipping containers, williamsburg, design,

It would hardly raise an eyebrow to note that the Brooklyn couple behind the wildly popular Williamsburg barbecue joint Fette Sau hired an architect to build them a 25-by-100-foot home on a corner lot in the neighborhood. But in this case, the architects are Ada Tolla and Giuseppe Lignano of the firm LOT-EK, which means the house in question is likely to cause at least a few double-takes. Rising from that corner lot, this remarkable single-family residence was made from 21 steel shipping containers, tamed and transformed into a sleek and surprisingly livable home.

See more of this unconventional home of corrugated steel and glass

Williamsburg shipping container house, Williamsburg Airbnb, shipping container architecture

There’s plenty of cool shipping container architecture that’s popped up around the city in recent years, from a retrofitted carriage house to the home of a radio station. But the title of first (legal) home built entirely of recycled containers goes to this architectural gem in Williamsburg, made of six stacked containers totaling 1,600 square feet. The lovely, 320-square-foot ground-floor apartment is now up for rent through Airbnb for a surprisingly affordable $96/night.

See the whole place

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