Search Result for Barclays Center

Photo by Ajay Suresh on Flickr

The Barclays Center has made many headlines recently, as it’s served as a hub for the city’s Black Lives Matter protests. And some locals hope to keep this momentum going and are pushing for the arena to be renamed for Brooklyn Dodgers player Jackie Robinson, the first African American Major League Baseball player. Arthur Piccolo of Park Slope actually began the effort back in 2006, but recently revived it, telling the Brooklyn Paper, “You’re seeing certain individuals being criticized and their statutes rightly removed, and here’s the opportunity to do something symbolic.”

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Photo credit: Melanie Greene

From the just-under-a-million pricetag to the lovely historic features to the outdoor space, this Fort Greene co-op has a lot going for it. Located at 143 Lafayette Avenue, the apartment is currently configured as a one-bedroom plus home office, but that bonus space would also make a great nursery or sitting room. An added bonus–the private deck overlooks the pre-war building’s English garden, which is complete with whimsical landscaping and seating areas.

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NYC subway, PPE vending machine

All photos: Marc Herman / MTA NYC Transit on Flickr

As of yesterday, the MTA rolled out 12 PPE vending machines in 10 busy subway stations. The machines, which offer reusable face masks, gloves, hand sanitizer, and sanitizing wipes, were installed as part of the MTA’s larger effort to keep subways sanitized and safe during the current COVID-19 pandemic.

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Photo by Eden, Janine, and Jim on Flickr

Although cultural institutions in New York City remain closed to the public because of the coronavirus, some are opening their lobbies to provide Black Lives Matter protestors a safe space, a restroom, snacks and water, WiFi, face masks, or just a place to recharge. The social media account “Open Your Lobby” launched last week on Twitter and Instagram to track the museums and theaters that are repurposing their space in support of protesters. According to the organizers, there are more than 70 organizations participating nationwide, with more than two dozen in New York City alone.

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Photo: Patrick Cashin / MTA New York City Transit

As the city prepares to enter phase one of reopening on Monday, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority released this week its plan to return to “regular” service, which no longer means 24-hour service. Subways and buses will run more frequently starting next week, but the subway system will still shut down between 1 a.m. and 5 a.m. for nightly disinfection. Mayor Bill de Blasio this week also released a plan for transit that calls for capacity limits and blocking off every other seat. But the MTA called the mayor’s idea “utterly unworkable” and said his proposed capacity limits would allow the agency to serve just 8 percent of riders.

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Photo of 1 Flatbush Avenue courtesy of Alexander Severin

Applications are now being accepted for 20 mixed-income apartments at a new Brooklyn high rise. The 19-story tower located at 1 Flatbush Avenue sits between Downtown Brooklyn and Fort Greene, conveniently located near a dozen subway lines, major shopping thoroughfares, and entertainment venues like the Barclays Center and the Brooklyn Academy of Music. New Yorkers earning 40 and 130 percent of the area median income can apply for the units, ranging from a $690/month studio to a $3,063/month two-bedroom.

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Photo courtesy of CityRealty

Applications are currently being accepted for 19 middle-income units at a new rental building in Brooklyn. Located a few blocks from the Barclays Center and the many restaurants and bars that sit on the border of Prospect Heights and Clinton Hill, 555 Waverly Avenue is an eight-story building with 190 total units. New Yorkers earning 130 percent of the area median income can apply for the apartments, which include $2,228/month studios, $2,346/month one-bedrooms, and $2,830/month two-bedrooms.

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Photo by Jörg Angeli on Unsplash

To show support for New York City’s essential workers on the frontline of the coronavirus pandemic, a number of buildings turned blue Thursday night. Madison Square Garden, One World Trade Center’s spire, Beacon Theatre, Pier 17, Hudson Yards’ Vessel, and more join more than 100 landmarks across the country as part of the #LightItBlue campaign. The nationwide lighting will occur weekly every Thursday.

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Photo: Marc A. Hermann / MTA New York City Transit / Flickr

By the close of 2019, the MTA had installed its OMNY tap-to-pay fare system at 64 subway stations across Manhattan and Brooklyn and all Staten Island busses. Some of the busiest spots that already have the contactless payment system include all 16 stations on the 4, 5, and 6 lines between Grand Central-42nd Street and Atlantic Avenue-Barclays Center, as well as Penn Station-34th Street. According to a new press release, OMNY will now expand to 60 more stations by the end of January–including Herald Square, Bryant Park, World Trade Center, and Jay Street-MetroTech–bringing the total to 124 stations.

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As the decade draws to a close, we’re reflecting on the growth and evolution of New York City during the 2010s. In the past 10 years, the city has seen the rebirth of neighborhoods, the creation of a totally new one, the return of a major sports team to Brooklyn, and the biggest subway expansion in decades. We’ve asked notable New Yorkers to share which project of the past decade they believe has made the most significant impact on the city, from the redevelopment of the World Trade Center site to the revival of the Coney Island boardwalk.

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