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Stuy Town

  • By Aisha Carter
  • , May 14, 2014

Photo via Wiki Commons

It looks like Stuyvesant Town-Peter Cooper Village may be headed back to auction. Manhattan’s largest rental community is no stranger to the game of musical chairs that their owners have been inadvertently playing. The complex, comprised of 80 acres, 110 buildings, and 11,231 units between 14th and 23rd Streets, has had an interesting decade. It sold to Tishman Speyer Properties and BlackRock for a record $5.4 billion at the height of the real estate boom in 2006. Despite being accused of trying to push out lower income residents with high prices, they actually defaulted on their loan in 2010. Ownership of the property was transferred to the lenders, represented by CWCapital.

Drama in Stuy Town

Architecture, Green Design, Meatpacking District, Starchitecture

Studio Gang‘s bold move to open an office in NYC couldn’t have come at a better time. The much admired studio led by Jeanne Gang just got the green light for their stunning angular glass structure, which will be sited right along the High Line on 10th Avenue between 13th and 14th streets.

Dubbed the ‘Solar Carve’, the new construction will be designated for office and retail use, housing 10 stories behind a glassy serrated edge and asymmetrical curves. The design, in true Studio Gang fashion, keeps sustainability in mind, and the building’s geometric form does follow function. The unique shape mitigates solar gain while taking advantage of the views between the High Line and the Hudson. A planted roof will also help cool the Solar Carve on hot days.

More renderings of Gang’s first NYC project here

Architecture, Events, Green Design, Landscape Architecture, Urban Design

  • By Aisha Carter
  • , May 13, 2014

The creative mind is so spectacular. There’s nothing more fun for designers than to be given a project where they can allow their imaginations to run rampant. Never was this more evident than with The Warehouse Gallery’s new exhibit opening next month. Five architecture firms were asked to design an idealistic plan of Atlantic Yards, conforming to the same dimensions as the actual project headed up by developer Forest City Ratner. These proportions include 4,278,000 square feet of housing and 156,00 square feet of retail space.

Find out more about the project here

Daily Link Fix

Images: New York underwater (left), Kickstarter project (right)

Architecture, People

The city’s most famous plazas straddle Fifth Avenue at 59th Street, and there’s a lot going on.

One of the city’s great entrances is the large marquee facing Fifth Avenue at the Plaza Hotel between 58th Street and Central Park South surmounted by five large ”outrigger” flags, at least one of which is the American flag. This past Sunday, there were two American flags, one Canadian flag, the Fairmount Hotels & Resorts flag, and the Plaza Hotel flag. The two American flags, however, were not standard and the “canton” of white stars against a blue background. These had too much blue background at the edge.

While pointing this out to the two doorman, Jarret Lazar, the manager of bell services, wandered by and expressed surprise at my observation. He said that the flags need to be changed every two or three weeks because they get ripped apart.

Taking in the changes of our great city

Brooklyn, Williamsburg

More here >>

Art, Design, Events

Spring is in full swing, so how about venturing around the city this week to experience some of the arts and culture New York has to offer?

Hob knob with donors and creatives at the annual Party in the Garden at the Museum of Modern Art, check out a secret bar behind an art opening, indulge in all things design at ICFF this weekend, or experience an art installation that encourages sleep. Another great week is yours for the taking!

All the best events here

Clinton Hill, Cool Listings, Interiors

  • By Aisha Carter
  • , May 13, 2014

A large part of the appeal of New York City is the historical nature of the buildings. However, how many buildings can boast that they were once own by not one, but two mayors? Well, the 4-story townhome at 405 Clinton Avenue has those bragging rights, and it’s on the market for a new owner.

The townhouse was initially designed in 1889 by William Bunker Tubby, the architect responsible for Pratt Institute’s library. He designed it for Charles A. Schieren, one of Brooklyn’s last mayors. It’s rumored that the home was also the residence of Brooklyn’s jazz-Age mayor Jimmy Walker, many decades before its current owners purchased it in 2009. After paying $1.75 million for the landmarked building, owner Sean Wilsey and his wife Daphne Beal gutted the entire place, adding roughly 100 new windows and a patio among other things.

Check out more photos of this gorgeous renovation here

Architecture, Construction Update, Fort Greene, Urban Design

It’s going to be a noisy summer for those living in the BAM Cultural District. Works have started on not one, but two of the glassy towers planned for the area.

The two towers will be located at 286 Ashland Place and 590 Fulton Street, and are designed by Ten Arquitectos and FXFOWLE, respectively. Heavy machinery was recently delivered to the sites and excavation has begun. The two projects are part of a major re-haul of the area around BAM into a new cultural hub for Brooklyn.

More on the two towers here

Brooklyn, Brooklyn Heights, Recent Sales

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , May 13, 2014

A beautiful, Italianate brownstone at 37 Remsen Street in the Brooklyn Heights Historic District sold for $7 million through a listing held by Brown Harris Stevens. It was originally listed for $6.2 million when it went on the market in January. The buyer is Jeremiah T. Healey, former Jersey City Mayor from 2004-2013, and his wife Megan McKee Healey, a tax law professor at NYU.

Built in 1899, the 25-foot-wide, 7,000-square-foot home retains a wealth of historic details including fanlight windows, cast iron vent covers, etched pocket doors, and wood-paneled chair rails. The decorative elements such as ceiling medallions, painted borders, and fancy ceiling moldings were likely to the taste of the previous owner, but they certainly add a bit of whimsy to the classical home.

More photos of the five-story regal brownstone this way

Archtober

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463 affordable units available at luxury LIC rental with sweeping city views and a waterfront park

  • By Devin Gannon

All renderings courtesy of VUW Studio

At a time when finding an affordable apartment in New York City feels impossible, here’s an opportunity to live in a luxury Long Island City building for less. A housing lottery has launched at Gotham Point, a two-tower mixed-use development in Hunter’s Point South with 1,132 apartments, a majority of which are priced below the market rate. After welcoming its first residents to the South tower this spring, the taller North tower is now accepting applications for 463 rent-stabilized rentals at 1-15 57th Avenue, Long Island City, NY. The 58-story building is open to New Yorkers earning between 30 percent and 165 percent of the area median income (AMI), or between $16,183 and $273,075 annually.*

Find out if you qualify