MORE TOP STORIES

Architecture, Cool Listings, Green Design, Hamptons, Interiors

  • By Ana Lisa Alperovich
  • , July 22, 2014

If you’ve been following our site from the start, you know that we love the rustic-meets-modern works of Bates Masi + Architects. So you can imagine our excitement when we were told that this small but stunning retreat, just steps away from the ocean, is now up for sale. Simply named the ‘Beach Hampton House’, this structure situated on the shores of Amagansett is a study in geometry and space at just 600 square feet, and offers luxurious seaside living with a minimal footprint.

Learn more about the Beach Hampton house here

Daily Link Fix

Images: Native Trails sinks (left), White flags on Brooklyn Bridge (right)

Cool Listings, Interiors, Manhattan, Midtown East

  • By Stephanie Hoina
  • , July 22, 2014

Here’s a great little twist on the New York City real estate market, courtesy of the recent trend to convert rooms in some of Manhattan’s most exclusive hotels into condominium apartments: fractional ownership—the timeshare to end all timeshares.

That’s right, now you can savor the pleasure of residing at one of the most glamorous addresses in the world with all the amenities the St. Regis has to offer, including the Remede Spa and Fitness center, salon, twice daily maid service, and 24-hour butler service—all without having to shell out the multimillion dollar sums typically associated with this kind of elegant living.

See what fractional ownership puts within reach

Architecture, Brooklyn, Design, History, Manhattan

  • By Jason Carpenter
  • , July 22, 2014

Banking made this town, and the bank buildings of the 19th and early 20th centuries continue to house some of New York’s most classic architecture and design. Greek, Roman, and even Byzantine Revival architectures were the style of choice for bank buildings, and those great stone pillars are still worth visiting today. Ahead are some of the most beautiful former bank buildings in New York City.

See these beautiful bank buildings here

Cool Listings, Interiors, Upper East Side

  • By Aisha Carter
  • , July 22, 2014

When you think of the Upper East Side, you can’t help but imagine the old Edith Wharton novels and early 20th century “polite society”. This $7,250,000 parlor apartment at 830 Park Avenue manages to embody that very spirit, while throwing in a bit of 21st century flair.

Take a look inside this prewar stunner here

Design, History, Transportation

For anyone in the world who’s ridden the New York City subway, they’ve undoubtedly taken a curious gander at the system map, full of its rainbow-colored, crisscrossing lines. But what many riders may not know is that in 1972, a man named Massimo Vignelli was commissioned by the city to create a very different version of this map, immediately sparking controversy for its geometric simplicity and geographical inaccuracy. In 1979, Vignelli’s map was replaced with a more organic, curving version like we see underground today.

In 2008, the MTA commissioned Vignelli’s firm to update their map, and a new version was put online to serve as the Weekender, highlighting weekend service changes. But now, underground map enthusiast Max Roberts has gone one step further, and claims he’s come up with a perfect compromise between the Vignelli work and the MTA’s signature map.

See what Mr. Roberts has come up with

Featured Story

Features, New Developments, real estate trends

  • By Lauren Price
  • , July 21, 2014

In the mid-2000s, when the real estate market was red hot with new developments, home seekers gave nary a thought to making what can be described as the biggest decision of their lives: Buying something sight unseen.

For them, traipsing through model apartments, checking out pretty renderings, gawking at miniature models, stroking teensy squares of countertop finishes, thumbing through shiny marketing materials filled with information on everything but the kitchen sink to make an actual purchase was par for the course. (Oh, wait! They did include the kitchen sink.) But then all that changed by late 2007 when the stock market took a nosedive. Not a single potential buyer would even consider a new place to hang their hats without actually standing inside a frameless glass shower stall, checking out the size of a Sub-Zero refrigerator or getting high from real-time views seen through floor-to-ceiling window—and developers took note.

But that was then and this is now, and with an improving economy and increasing demand, the tides seem to have turned once again.

Is buying off blueprint back in full force?

Real Estate Wire

  • Juul-Hansen’s condos are on the rise and now flanking both sides of the High Line Park. [Curbed]
  • Manhattan’s office buildings are being valued at pre-crash levels. [WSJ]
  • Who owns New York? Chinese developers apparently. Here are four high-profile Chinese developers pouring their cash into Manhattan. [TRD]
  • Own your own “Italian/French” villa… on Staten Island. [Curbed]
  • New kid on the block Urban Compass turns a year old, and it’s celebrating its first year of success with $40M in new capital. The company is now valued at a staggering $360M. [6sqft inbox; Urban Compass]
  • Madison Realty Capital has paid $30M for two apartment buildings in Harlem, banking on the area’s continued gentrification. [Crain’s]

Juul Hansen’s condos under construction (left); The Staten Island villa (right)

Art, Design, Green Design

David Taylor, aka Superdave, is a Scottish-born, Stockholm-based designer who creates precious objects out of ordinary and found materials. His latest work, called Slag, consists of candlesticks made from assorted materials combined with pieces of iron found at the site of an abandoned 1600s iron foundry deep in the forests of Sweden.

Learn more about these precious candlesticks

Architecture, Design, Hamptons, Interiors

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , July 21, 2014

When we say organic here, we don’t just mean the natural materials used throughout the house; we’re referring to the fact that the project developed organically in response to the homeowners’ seven-acre, East Hamptons lot and existing house. Built around 1982, the original structure was in dire need of a renovation. Robert Young Architecture and Interiors was committed to reusing as much of this house as possible, but wasn’t sure if a restoration would be more economical than constructing a new house. Property surveys showed that the house was closer to the lot’s picturesque kettle pond than current zoning would allow, so building a new structure would compromise privacy and the water views. From there, the Kettle Hole House was born amidst the lot’s abundance of white pine trees.

See how the architects transformed the existing home into a cozy, contemporary retreat

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463 affordable units available at luxury LIC rental with sweeping city views and a waterfront park

  • By Devin Gannon

All renderings courtesy of VUW Studio

At a time when finding an affordable apartment in New York City feels impossible, here’s an opportunity to live in a luxury Long Island City building for less. A housing lottery has launched at Gotham Point, a two-tower mixed-use development in Hunter’s Point South with 1,132 apartments, a majority of which are priced below the market rate. After welcoming its first residents to the South tower this spring, the taller North tower is now accepting applications for 463 rent-stabilized rentals at 1-15 57th Avenue, Long Island City, NY. The 58-story building is open to New Yorkers earning between 30 percent and 165 percent of the area median income (AMI), or between $16,183 and $273,075 annually.*

Find out if you qualify