MORE TOP STORIES

Architecture, Downtown Brooklyn, DUMBO, Major Developments

  • By Ondel Hylton
  • , May 14, 2014

Leeser Architects, designer of the Museum of the Moving Image expansion in Astoria, seems to be single-handedly upping the architecture ante in the outer-boroughs. Fresh off the heels of demolition commencing on the site of their multi-faceted 30-story Marriott Autograph Collection tower in the BAM Cultural District, Leeser may also be busy in the conversion of DUMBO’s five-building Jehovah Witness Watchtower complex into a high tech incubator and residential tower.

See the renderings we’ve uncovered after the jump

Design, Green Design, Technology

The design of this compact solar charging lantern, called Electree Mini, was influenced by bonsai trees and fractal patterns found in nature. Created by French designer Vivien Muller, it “provides solar-derived power to environments typically void of renewable energy.”

On the movable branches are small solar panels which capture sunlight — a play on photosynthesis. The solar energy is then stored in small batteries that can directly power up your gadgets. Electree Mini has the capability to charge AA and AAA batteries and comes with a USB port that will charge smartphones. At dusk, the tree automatically lights up, and when rotated the LED light sensors change colors.

More design details this way

Daily Link Fix

Images: Gingerbread House (left), Fab Sofa Line (right)

Featured Story

City Living, Features

The Local Yokel Trap of New York City

By Andrew Cotto, Wed, May 14, 2014

  • By Andrew Cotto
  • , May 14, 2014

As a Brooklynite surrounded by progressives, I’m well aware of the need to “think globally and act locally” on a whole lot of matters. This persistent mantra seems particularly true when it comes to commerce, prompting those of us who heed such calls to shop (and generally pay more) at farmer’s markets and mom & pop retailers, especially those in our very own neighborhood. This is how vital local businesses can be sustained in an environment rife with soulless, big chain predators. OK. Fine. So I do my part by forking over ten bucks to a farmer for a bunch of kale and a handful of carrots, though I can’t understand why it costs more to buy the stuff direct from the guy who grew it himself. And then there was the time a Hudson Valley hipster tried to sell me a three pound chicken for $27.

“What was it,” I asked. “Raised on truffles?”

 
Read more of Andrew’s story here

Interiors, Recent Sales, Upper East Side

  • By Aisha Carter
  • , May 14, 2014

Why anyone would want to leave this gorgeous Carnegie Hill penthouse at 1150 5th Avenue will remain a mystery for the ages. For some reason, the penthouse’s former owners, Karim Rashid and Tracy Buescher, have decided to sell their beautiful 5th Avenue pad. However, someone just hit the jackpot when they scooped up the 3BR/3.5BA beauty, built in 1924 by J.E.R. Carpenter – the unsung hero of 5th Avenue. The co-op was designed by architect Charles Platt, the award winning designer responsible for Washington D.C’s Freer Gallery of Art.

Take a look inside this gorgeous penthouse here

Cool Listings, Tribeca

  • By Stephanie Hoina
  • , May 14, 2014

The Hudson River may flow in two directions (yup, north and south, look it up!), but the lucky owners who combine the two full floor contemporary lofts (#5 and #6 ) at 471 Washington Street will be too busy to notice while taking in the stunning protected views of this majestic waterway.

Check out why

Stuy Town

  • By Aisha Carter
  • , May 14, 2014

Photo via Wiki Commons

It looks like Stuyvesant Town-Peter Cooper Village may be headed back to auction. Manhattan’s largest rental community is no stranger to the game of musical chairs that their owners have been inadvertently playing. The complex, comprised of 80 acres, 110 buildings, and 11,231 units between 14th and 23rd Streets, has had an interesting decade. It sold to Tishman Speyer Properties and BlackRock for a record $5.4 billion at the height of the real estate boom in 2006. Despite being accused of trying to push out lower income residents with high prices, they actually defaulted on their loan in 2010. Ownership of the property was transferred to the lenders, represented by CWCapital.

Drama in Stuy Town

Architecture, Green Design, Meatpacking District, Starchitecture

Studio Gang‘s bold move to open an office in NYC couldn’t have come at a better time. The much admired studio led by Jeanne Gang just got the green light for their stunning angular glass structure, which will be sited right along the High Line on 10th Avenue between 13th and 14th streets.

Dubbed the ‘Solar Carve’, the new construction will be designated for office and retail use, housing 10 stories behind a glassy serrated edge and asymmetrical curves. The design, in true Studio Gang fashion, keeps sustainability in mind, and the building’s geometric form does follow function. The unique shape mitigates solar gain while taking advantage of the views between the High Line and the Hudson. A planted roof will also help cool the Solar Carve on hot days.

More renderings of Gang’s first NYC project here

Architecture, Events, Green Design, Landscape Architecture, Urban Design

  • By Aisha Carter
  • , May 13, 2014

The creative mind is so spectacular. There’s nothing more fun for designers than to be given a project where they can allow their imaginations to run rampant. Never was this more evident than with The Warehouse Gallery’s new exhibit opening next month. Five architecture firms were asked to design an idealistic plan of Atlantic Yards, conforming to the same dimensions as the actual project headed up by developer Forest City Ratner. These proportions include 4,278,000 square feet of housing and 156,00 square feet of retail space.

Find out more about the project here

Daily Link Fix

Images: New York underwater (left), Kickstarter project (right)

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For under $1M, these Jersey City condos add modern touches to a historic Victorian home

  • By Dana Schulz

All listing photos by Melissa Cacioppo

McGinley Square is perhaps one of Jersey City’s most interesting neighborhoods. It’s full of 19th-century row houses, Victorian homes, and Art Deco retail spaces, and it’s close to the PATH and Light Rail at Journal Square, as well as to the incredible 270-acre Lincoln Park. The real estate opportunities are great, too. Take, for example, this two-unit Victorian home at 41 Bentley Avenue. The three-bedroom homes, listed for $879,000 and $919,000, are full of architectural details like stained glass windows and cozy rooms in the turrets, but they also have been completely updated for modern living. The house also features an idyllic wrap-around porch and garage parking.

Take a full tour here

New condo 2505 Broadway adapts pre-war elegance for modern Upper West Side living

  • By Dana Schulz

All renderings by MOSO Studio

Long known as a family neighborhood rooted in its pre-war history, the Upper West Side has found a new life in recent years, attracting young professionals and a commercial boom that’s brought countless downtown restaurants uptown. And, of course, along with this transition comes a reimaging of the residential market. Take for example the 44-unit condo at 2505 Broadway. It was designed by Eran Chen and the architects at ODA in their signature modular style, but it retains the classic sophistication the neighborhood is known for. The residences are refined yet modern, and there is an array of forward-looking amenities such as a state-of-the-art gym with adjacent flexible space used as a sports court or movie theater, a pet spa, and an outdoor terrace overlooking the Hudson River.

Read more