MORE TOP STORIES

Brooklyn, Cool Listings, Interiors, Park Slope

  • By Stephanie Hoina
  • , September 3, 2014

There are lofts, and then there are lofts like this three-bedroom, two-and-a-half-bath duplex in an 1880s factory building at 420 12th Street. Once home to the Ansonia Clock Company, the building was converted into a co-op by Hurley & Farinella Architects, nearly a century after being constructed. With intentions of keeping the building’s provenance intact, the architects worked diligently to maintain original details like exposed brick, factory beams and wood ceilings, and combined them with modern updates that mesh seamlessly with the building’s historic bones.

See more of this timeless beauty

Daily Link Fix

Daily Link Fix: Sleep on the Job; Toasted or Untoasted Bagels?

By Alyssa Alimurung, Wed, September 3, 2014

Celebrities, Chelsea, Interiors, Recent Sales

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , September 3, 2014

You may remember Kira Plastinina making headlines back in 2008, when she, all at the age of 16, launched her namesake fashion line, opened a dozen US stores, and later that same year closed them all and filed for bankruptcy. Originally from Moscow, Kira has now launched a new high-end fashion line called Lublu in Dallas, Texas, but it looks like she might also be planning to make some moves in the Big Apple. According to city records, she purchased apartment 3A at the Slate Condominium at 163 West 18th Street for $2.45 million.

Take a look inside here

Architecture, New Developments, Upper East Side

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , September 3, 2014

Looks like the Upper East Side will be adding another luxury condo project to its roster–but this time it’s an “affordable luxury” building. Located at 1711 First Avenue at East 89th Street, the 34-story building is being designed by SHoP Architects for Anbau Enterprises, who has shared renderings of the project with New York YIMBY.

The building will have a bluestone base with a small cantilever over the 89th Street entrance. The rest of the façade will be brick and glass, offering floor-to-ceiling windows without the total curtain wall appearance. The western façade will be slightly glassier than the rest of the building.

More details here

Architecture, Hotels, New Developments, Williamsburg

Williamsburg’s upcoming Level Hotel is right on track for its 2016 opening as construction continues moves full speed ahead at 55 Wythe Avenue. Back in July, architects Yohay Albo and Nick Liberis of Albo Liberis LLC were revealed as the brains behind the building’s ultra modern form, and it’s just been announced that Gunn Landscape Architecture will be taking charge of the expansive rooftop escape that will sit atop the retail pod of the futuristic hotel.

A look at the rooftop design here

Cool Listings, East Village, Historic Homes, Interiors

  • By Aisha Carter
  • , September 3, 2014

Situated in the St. Mark’s Historic District, 114 East 10th Street and the surrounding Anglo-Italianate houses make up what many consider the most beautiful street in the East Village. Prominent architect James Renwick Jr. designed the original home as part of the distinguished Renwick Triangle back in 1861—some of the last single-family dwellings built in the neighborhood. This gut-renovated, historic townhouse didn’t have the best of luck when it sold for $5 million cash after several price drops from its initial $7 million asking. However, after four years, the six-story townhouse has emerged bright, fresh, and asking $7.5 million.

Take a look inside, here

Financial District, Hotels, New Developments

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , September 3, 2014

Back in June, we took a look at the winning designs for Prodigy Network’s 17John ‘Cotel’ (collaborative + hotel = cotel), the city’s first crowdsourced hotel and the world’s first collaborative hotel. Now, the real estate crowdfunding startup has closed on the 15-story rental building at 17 John Street for $85.3 million, $25 million of which came from crowdfunded equity. Additional financing came from Deutsche Bank and another institutional investor. The property will be transformed into a 23-story, 191-unit extended-stay hotel, designed for the next generation of business traveler.

More on the first-of-its-kind project in NYC

Architecture, Interiors, Manhattan, Soho

  • By Stephanie Hoina
  • , September 2, 2014

Anyone who incorporates an 80-foot multi-floor slide into a home and repurposes a riveted steel column into a 50-foot-tall climbing wall in the living room knows how to make the most out of a space in our book. When we saw what architect David Hotson did in the penthouse in FiDi, we were more than happy to check out another Hotson-designed residence: this stunning Soho loft featuring an incredible spiral staircase that winds though the entire home.

What does White and Bright and Stunning Look Like? Read on

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, History, Starchitecture

Frank Lloyd Wright Designs Destined for NYC But Never Built

By Jason Carpenter, Tue, September 2, 2014

  • By Jason Carpenter
  • , September 2, 2014

Many wonder why such a prolific and famous architect as Frank Lloyd Wright didn’t have more buildings in New York City. It’s safe to say he wasn’t a huge fan of urban density, but how could one possibly create something as iconic as the Guggenheim’s spirals without getting any other work in the city? As we showed in a previous post, two Wright designs have actually been demolished. Now, we will look at the two buildings Wright intended for the New York area which were never fully realized—at least, not in Manhattan.

See the Frank Lloyd Wright designs here

Real Estate Wire

  • It’s cheaper to buy than rent in a number of US cities. [Business Insider]
  • Forest City is suing Skanska over the Pacific Park (formerly the Atlantic Yards) B2 modular tower. Skanska issued a Stop Work Order last week over cost overruns, and Forest City is now countering with a lawsuit saying Skanska agreed to a “fixed price” and any issues are due to the builder’s own “failures and missteps”. [Curbed]
  • The New York Times Editorial Board is in favor of cutting deals with private developers if it means bringing more affordable housing stock to NYC. [NYT]
  • The New York City Department of Transportation breaks ground on the second phase of Fordham Plaza’s reconstruction in the Bronx. Grimshaw is the architect behind the design. [Architect’s Newspaper]
  • Op-ed: Brooklyn Bridge Park can be maintained without building any of these 14 new high-rises on the park. The park is poised to come into as much as $200M when tax breaks expire starting 2018. [NYDN]
  • Developer Aby Rosen Instagramed an image of what the interiors of the Norman Foster-designed 610 Lexington Avenue will look like. [Curbed]

Images: B2 (left). Image by Field of Schemes; Manhattan aerial (right). Image Wiki Commons

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