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Featured Story

Features, Hotels

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , July 24, 2014

Who wouldn’t want to be able to order a juicy burger in the middle of the night and have it delivered in mere minutes? Or never have to worry about making the bed or folding sheets ever again (does anyone know how to fold the fitted sheet properly)? How about having an on-call masseuse? This is the life of living in a condo hotel.

Today, the city is teeming with these luxurious hybrids. The Residences at the Ritz Carlton in Battery Park City are home to the city’s most expensive listing at $118 million. The landmark Plaza Hotel was partially converted to 181 residences in 2008. And let’s not forget One57, the 90-story, 52-condo tower that will be the first five-star luxury hotel to rise in New York City in the last ten years. But do the vacation-worthy amenities at these buildings make them dominant in the real estate market?

We take a closer look

Architecture, Queens

  • By Diane Pham
  • , July 24, 2014

Image © Matthew Silva

After coming into nearly $6 million for the restoration of Philip Johnson’s ‘Tent of Tomorrow’, preservationists have been hit with heartbreaking news that vandals recently broke into the icon, setting fire to a van and inflicting considerable damage on the already deteriorating terrazzo map.

More on the incident here

Policy

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , July 24, 2014

It’s not always as easy as one might think to successfully advocate for the landmark designation of an historic building in New York, especially when that building’s owner is not on board with preservation efforts.

According to the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation (GVSHP), more than 20 historically significant buildings (including those designed by renowned architects like Frank Lloyd Wright and Morris Lapidus) have been heavily altered or altogether demolished over the past 12 years after city officials gave word to owners that their buildings were under consideration for landmarking. This comes from a new report that GVSHP commissioned, which examines the Bloomberg administration’s actions regarding the notification given to developers and owners that the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) was looking at their properties, allowing alteration and demolition permits to slip through before any historic protections were granted.

We take a closer look at this preservation predicament

History, Social Media

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , July 23, 2014

Ever wish you could step back in time and spend a day in old New York? Drink some bathtub gin at a speakeasy or ride the original, elevated train? Well, now you can–at least through pictures. The website WhatWasThere ties historical photos to Google Maps, allowing users to tour familiar streets and neighborhoods. People from all over the world can upload their old photos and tag them with the location and year taken. Pretty simple, huh? The site hopes that if “enough people upload enough photographs in enough places” it will weave together a photographic history of the world.

We take a look at some of our favorite New York locations

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, New Developments, People

  • By Tag Brum
  • , July 23, 2014

Architect Piet Boon may hail from the Netherlands, but his status as a NYC starchitect is on the rise. Piet, who started his career as a builder, has over the years turned his practice to architecture and interiors, and today is a top choice amongst developers who want more than just a glass tower, but a building that promotes well-being through great design (oh-so-very Dutch). Piet recently sat down with us for an interview where he discussed everything from the differences he sees in Dutch and American design sensibilities, to his high profile Huys Penthouses project (which is almost sold out), to his new Oosten development for Williamsburg, to his definitively international style, which to our surprise he refers to as “barefoot chic.”

Read our interview with Piet here

Real Estate Wire

  • Building, business owners and, of course, developers want to see a rezoning of Crown Heights so that more light industry and residential buildings can be brought to the already rapidly-gentrifying neighborhood. [TRD]
  • Ridgewood Lodge No. 710, a mysterious Masonic temple in Ridgewood, has received Landmark status. [Curbed]
  • A look at the former Verizon buildings that have been sold off for condo conversion. [NYT]
  • Own an early 1900’s Astor row house for $1.7M. Cash only. [Curbed]
  • Developer Young Woo is tapping RXR Realty for $200 million to redevelop the badly deteriorated Pier 57 at the foot of West 15th Street. The project is being called the “Superpier”. [Crain’s]

Superpier (left); Crown Heights (right)

Cool Listings, Interiors, Upper East Side

  • By Aisha Carter
  • , July 23, 2014

They say purchasing a home means you have to compromise. Surely you can’t have everything you want. Well, this $18 million opulent apartment in the York & Sawyer-designed 860 Park Avenue would beg to differ. Old world charm? Check. Modern conveniences? Check. Enough architectural details to make the biggest architecture nerd’s head spin? Check and check. This 4th floor unit is the supreme luxury abode, in one of the city’s premier white-glove co-ops, which is exactly what you would expect of a building designed by the same people responsible for the Federal Reserve Bank and the Bowery Savings Bank.

Take a look inside the remarkable co-op here

Cool Listings, Greenwich Village, New Developments

  • By Diane Pham
  • , July 23, 2014

Twelfth Street residents are about to get a flurry of new neighbors, as The Nathaniel launches leasing for its rentals today. The nine-floor building offers up 85 light-filled residences ranging from studios to three-bedrooms—all boasting some pretty nice living space. Though ‘Greenwich Village’ and ‘luxury homes’ pretty much go hand in hand these days, The Nathaniel brings a new typology for living to the neighborhood with an industrial exterior conceived by Karl Fischer, and modern interiors by McCartan.

Take a tour inside

Chelsea, Cool Listings, Interiors, Starchitecture

  • By Stephanie Hoina
  • , July 23, 2014

Simplicity bordering on grandeur: that should be 2014 Pritzker Prize Laureate Shigeru Ban’s motto. Like his designs, the names of his residential projects are simple and clean, yet evoke a striking image before you ever lay eyes on the work. Curtain Wall House, Naked House, Cast Iron House, Furniture House, Crescent House, Picture Window House, Boomerang House – step inside any one of these exquisite residences and you might almost miss the complexity of Ban’s artistry; but make no mistake there is a quiet ingenuity to his vision.

Metal Shutter Houses at 524 West 19th Street is no exception. Named for the motorized perforated shutters that cover the two major facades of the building and the retractable walls of glass, each apartment within it offers an almost seamless continuity between the interior and exterior space.

Intrigued? So were we. Which is why we just had to take a peek inside this 2,700-square-foot duplex currently renting for $22,000 per month.

Right this way to be wowed by Shigeru Ban’s genius

Architecture, Design, Interiors, Upstate

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , July 23, 2014

And not just because red is the color of love; one look at this compact, but mighty Upstate cottage and your heart will start beating a little faster. The pop of color against the woodsy landscape, the modern yet rustic architecture, and the innovative, practical design–the Red House by Ryall Porter Sheridan is definitely swoon-worthy.

Find out why else we’re crushing over this home

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