MORE TOP STORIES

Architecture, Cool Listings, Greenwich Village

  • By Diane Pham
  • , June 13, 2014

Lovers of NYC landmarks rejoiced just last week when it was announced that Justin Korsant of Long Light Capital would be keeping the frontage of his recent Greenwich Village buy intact. But even with plans in the works to gut the interior and start fresh, Long has no intention of living in the home at 18 West 11th. The soon-to-be-updated pad and was just listed for $13.5 million over at Urban Compass. Long originally paid $9.25 million for the property. Downtown flip, anyone?

See the new floorplan and renderings here

Uncategorized

  • Kentile Sign to Come Down: Sadly, the Kentile Floors will have to come down, but it won’t be destroyed. The New York Times has more on the sign’s fate.
  • A Lone Pie Protestor: When the Orange is the New Black themed truck started handing out free pies, we seriously doubt they expected to be protested. But one former prisoner wasn’t having it. And she told the Observer why.
  • 345 Carroll Street Condo’s Launch Sales: Demolition has begun on the Regency Carts building and Sterling Equities has launched sales for the new development on Carroll Street. The Brownstoner has more details about the new condominium.
  • New Places to Check Out in the Hamptons: It’s summertime which only means one thing for New Yorkers – a mass exodus for the Hamptons. The Real Deal has the scoop on the new hotels, restaurants, and stores popping up that are all the rave.
  • Times New Roman is So Yesterday: Everyone knows the font but designers rarely use it. FastCo. examines why.
  • Is Williamsburg the New Soho?:  The hip Brooklyn neighborhood is showing all the signs of a pre-adolescent Soho back in the day. The Wall Street Journal predicts its future.

Images: Kentile Floors sign (left), 345 Carroll Street rendering (right)

Architecture, Major Developments, Tribeca

The Unveiling of 101 Tribeca Is Better Than Expected

By Aisha Carter, Fri, June 13, 2014

  • By Aisha Carter
  • , June 13, 2014

If you didn’t like the renderings revealed earlier this year for the much-anticipated tower at 101 Murray Street, you’ll be pleasantly surprised to know that they were incorrect. New renderings – the right renderings- have been released to New York YIMBY… and she’s a beauty.

101 Tribeca, as she’ll be called, is being developed by Fisher Brothers and The Witkoff Group, and designed by Kohn Pederson Fox. The building is set to soar over Tribeca at roughly 950 feet tall with a sleek, slender design that elegantly bevels out at the top. The 63-story structure will house 129 condominiums, totaling 433,800 square feet. Its tall ceilings, coupled with its sheer height, promises to deliver unobstructed views that will stretch as far as New Jersey and Long Island.

Find out more about this record-breaking structure here

Stuyvesant Town

Photo via Wiki Commons

Here we go again. Stuyvesant Town and Peter Cooper Village on Manhattan’s east side have a long history of being an affordable option for middle-income workers. But these days its hold on that place in the city’s housing landscape appears tenuous at best.

Though rent-stabilizations laws have been in effect for many units and about half are below-market rates, the remainder is comprised of luxury apartments, with one-bedroom units fetching as much as $2,900 a month, more than double the rate in 2006 when nearly ¾ of the units were below market. And with the property poised to sell for billions of dollars, the trend towards more luxury rentals seems likely.

More on the city’s plan to keep rents low

Featured Story

Features, Manhattan, real estate trends

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , June 13, 2014

At any given hour when you turn on a home design television channel you have about a 50% chance of landing on a realty show about flipping houses.  In real life, though, it’s not all hunky property brothers and fairy tale endings; trying to flip a house is a gamble, which is why oftentimes the most successful flippers are those on the inside, like real estate developers and seasoned brokers.

For anyone looking to make a flip, New York is ripe with opportunity thanks to low inventory and a constant race to be bigger and better.  Within the city, Downtown Manhattan is the ripest fruit on the vine.  Full of highly desirable, trendy neighborhoods, it’s a hot bed for investors.  There’s no textbook definition of a flip, but it’s generally thought of as a three-year turnover.  Downtown there have been 58 apartment swaps within the past three years.  We take a look at some of the greatest hits.

This way for all the triumphant flips

Cool Listings, Greenwich Village, Interiors

  • By Diane Pham
  • , June 12, 2014

Most New Yorkers are used to squeezing into small quarters, but few of those spaces boast dramatic ceilings like this beautiful little home at 67 East 11th Street in Greenwich Village. Measuring approximately 950-square-feet, this duplex loft is perfect for a single or for a no fuss no muss couple that wants to live minimally. And unlike the other tiny spaces of Manhattan, this loft is a light-filled abode with 10-foot tall windows and southern exposures that ensure every day will be a sunny one in the village.

Take a peek inside the Greenwich digs here

Architecture, Hotels, New Developments, Williamsburg

The new Level Hotel planned for 55 Wythe in Williamsburg wasn’t much more than a rendering when it was revealed last month, but one of 6sqft’s intrepid reporters swung by the site recently only to find that construction on the Jetson’s-like building had commenced. Permits for the 320,000 square foot hotel were approved in early April, and according to locals, heavy equipment arrived on the scene a few weeks ago with groundwork now well underway.

Now, further cementing Level’s status as a hotel of the future, the hotel’s developer, Zelig Weiss, closed on an $18.35 million loan from Madison Realty Capital to purchase the site for about $30 million, according to Crain‘s.

More details and photos here

Architecture, Getting Away, Interiors

  • By Patty Lee
  • , June 12, 2014

James Biber’s portfolio features plenty of famous and easy-to-recognize works. In New York, the acclaimed architect has made his mark with designs like the Fashion Center kiosk and CUNY’s Macaulay Honors College. Outside of the city, he’s been on board projects that include the Harley-Davidson Museum and Arizona Cardinals Stadium.

These big-name clients are the result of nearly 25 years in the industry, but often it’s the smaller ones that leave the strongest impression. Case in point: Biber calls these three houses in Long Island “a seminal course in building.”

Details on the three buildings here

Celebrities, Interiors, Recent Sales

  • By Diane Pham
  • , June 12, 2014

Walmart heiress, philanthropist, and the 14th richest person in the world, Alice Walton, will be moving into a $25 million duplex condo at 515 Park Avenue. The Post reports that the Walton claimed the 30th and 31st floors of the Lenox Hill co-op building — a unit with 6,346 square feet of space hosting five bedrooms, six bathrooms, a grand staircase, and 52 windows that offer up panoramic views of the city. 515 Park also has its own exclusive kitchen and caterer, Chef Daniel Boulud, and 15 private, climate-controlled wine cellars.

Take a look inside here

Cool Listings, Interiors

  • By Patty Lee
  • , June 12, 2014

Do you think too many of the new buildings coming up nowadays look like glassy, reflective eyesores? Then you’ll be happy to set your eyes on this brand-new tower located at 234 East 23rd Street developed by the Naftali Group. With floor-to-ceiling casement windows, the facade is plenty modern, but the building is most striking because of its red brick nod to the Gramercy neighborhood it calls home. The units in the building just were just listed today, and you can get your first peek of the interiors right here.

Your first look inside the new building right this way

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