MORE TOP STORIES

Real Estate Wire

  • New York City’s tallest skyscrapers [TRD]
  • Rentals on North 10th Street in Williamsburg hit the market, starting at $2,385 a month [Brownstoner]
  • A residential tower might rise on a controversial Park Place site [Curbed]
  • Tour the former Sisters of Mercy Convent in Clinton Hill [Brownstoner]
  • The horrifying outdoor spaces of Craigslist apartments [Curbed]
  • Medgar Evers College finally moves forward with $15M plan to transform Crown Heights St. into green campus [NYDN]
  • West Side development site trades for $43M [Commercial Observer]

Supertall skyscrapers One57 and 50 UN Plaza (left); Scary outdoor spaces (right)

Social Media

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By 6sqft, Tue, July 15, 2014

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Want to keep up on all things NYC real estate, design and architecture? Would you like to share some of our fun, beautiful and fascinating stories with your social circle? Give your Facebook feed a little more oomph by liking 6sqft. You’ll get our top stories delivered right to your Facebook front page!

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Construction Update, Financial District, Major Developments, Transportation

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , July 14, 2014

As many of you architecture buffs know, One WTC now rises a symbolic 1,776 feet, making it the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere and the third tallest in the entire world. Designed by renowned architect David Childs of Skidmore, Owings and Merrill, it also has a LEED Gold certification and is the most environmentally sustainable project of its size. After a temporary real estate slump, the 104-story, glass and steel building is now 56% leased, with big-time tenants like Conde Naste, Morgan Stanley, Legends Hospitality, and BMB Group. Eight years after construction began, One World Trade is at an exciting juncture with its tenants expected to move in by the end of the year, already beginning to build out their office spaces. The original crew of 10,000 has been reduced to 600, and we’re checking in on what these remaining workers are up to.

Check out some amazing photos of the progress at One WTC

Green Design, Products

Enjoying a good cup of tea is one of life’s most simple pleasures, but the whole experience gets even more exquisite if we prepare it with something as beautiful as FEM’s Koruku tea set. The design beautifully blends the Japanese tea culture with Scandinavian design traditions, made from a combination of milky white porcelain and renewable cork.

Tea for two?

Daily Link Fix

Images: Shake Shack’s furniture (left), Amazing Modern Kitchen Cabinets (right)

Cool Listings, Interiors, Upper East Side

  • By Aisha Carter
  • , July 14, 2014

How would you like to live in a hotel? And we’re not just talking any hotel; we’re talking a luxury landmark hotel in New York City. We’re talking a hotel where you can wake up and order room service from acclaimed chef Jean-Georges, then get your hair done at Frederic Fekkai. Do we have your attention yet? Because if you like what you just read, you’re going to love the 9BR/10.5BA, 8,577-square-foot beauty we’re about to show you at The Mark.

Check out this dynamic duo here

Architecture, Green Design, Policy

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , July 14, 2014

Two of the biggest trends in the current NYC real estate market are tall, glass towers and eco-friendly design. Oftentimes, though, these two architectural movements don’t meet, and now environmentalists are calling for stricter regulations that would make this marriage a requirement, by way of decreasing the huge expanses of curtain wall windows that the towers have adopted as their hallmark.

More of the debate this way

Architecture, Interiors

  • By Ana Lisa Alperovich
  • , July 14, 2014

Architect Tim Seggerman renovated an extended a Brooklyn Brownstone blending Finnish and Japanese aesthetics in a beautiful way. Located in Cobble Hill, this family home was re-conceived in a modern way, respecting its traditional brownstone facade with a surprising extension at the back. Using a variety of wood that includes white oak, mahogany, bamboo, teak and ash, the local architect turned this Brooklyn dwelling into a stylish comfortable place to live.

Tour the home here

Cool Listings, Interiors, Upper East Side

  • By Stephanie Hoina
  • , July 14, 2014

Okay, so this immaculate penthouse perched high atop 875 Fifth Avenue really isn’t a tree house, but given its miles of treetop views we could be forgiven for taking a few liberties with the term. Packed within Manhattan’s roughly 520 million square feet are some of the most amazing residences in the world, many of them boasting gorgeous interiors but not much in the way of outdoor space. It’s a concession one must make for living in the most vibrant city in the world. But every once in a while, something special comes along.

See more of this 5th Avenue treehouse

maps, Technology, Urban Design

As New Yorkers we’re constantly on the go and our movements are very much the pulse of the city. A new smartphone app developed by Human is tracking these movements and turning them into an incredible map that beautifully visualizes how we navigate our streets. Are you part of the pack?

Find out more here

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Lior Barak and Christine Blackburn PRESENT A THREE-PART SERIES

The Italian side of Williamsburg: History, famous joints, and today’s culture

  • By Michelle Cohen

Photo via Flickr cc

A bustling Brooklyn enclave that is today an impossibly trendy and diverse mix of glassy condos, hip new restaurants and storefronts, and unassuming multi-family homes in the northeast section of Williamsburg was one of New York City’s notable Italian-American neighborhoods for much of the 20th century. While it may not have the tourist cachet of Manhattan’s Little Italy–or the old-fashioned village-y coziness of Carroll Gardens–this swath of the ‘burg, bounded roughly by Montrose, Union, Richardson, and Humboldt Streets, was a little bit of Italy in its own right from the 1800s until as late as the 1990s. The north end of Graham Avenue was even christened Via Vespucci to commemorate the historic Italian-American community.

Read more