MORE TOP STORIES

Events, Landscape Architecture

For One Day Only, Tour 300 Acres of Freshkills Park

By Diane Pham, Wed, September 10, 2014

  • By Diane Pham
  • , September 10, 2014

Freshkills Park is the largest landfill reclamation project of its kind in the world, and aside from a weekly public (but escorted) program, it remains a closed site during its massive transformation. Now, the park is ready to give New York inhabitants a better look at what’s underway, letting visitors roam free across more than 300 acres of the 2,200 acre park on September 28th from 11AM-4PM. The event, which celebrates the New Springville Greenway, will be like no other, offering up a flurry of fun outdoor activities and music and, above all, a chance to experience the impressive infrastructural project as it moves forward.

More on the sneak ‘peak’ event here

Real Estate Wire

  • A ‘seven-star hotel’ will rise on the former site of the Rizzoli Bookstore near Central Park. [WSJ]
  • Aby Rosen wants to turn an 11-unit co-op at 1025 Park Avenue into his personal 19,000-square-foot mansion. [NYDN]
  • Owners of a 13-story, 23-apartment rental at 11 Spencer Court in Bed-Stuy are looking to make $13 million sale—50% more than what they paid for it two years ago. [Crain’s]
  • A look inside the SOM-designed residential building at 252 East 57th. [Curbed]

The Bed-Stuy residential “tower” (left); 1025 Park Avenue. Image by Dwellings NYC (right)

Furniture, Green Design

MAKE/SHIFT by Movisi Takes a New Angle on Modular Shelving

By Dana Schulz, Wed, September 10, 2014

And we mean that literally. The unique wedge-shaped units of Movisi’s self-adjusting shelving system MAKE/SHIFT can be installed at almost any angle. They also cleverly interlock with each other thanks to corrugated edges, filling unusually shaped niches, spaces between columns, or empty wall space.

More on the design

Brooklyn, Clinton Hill, Historic Homes, real estate trends

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , September 10, 2014

In January of 2013, in the dead of winter, an 1899 detail-laden Italianate townhouse fixer-upper at 102 Gates Avenue hit an inventory-starved rising market. The listing price of $1.295 million, was a double-take for many, even though it was less than what properties like it were selling for in the area.

Fast forward to September 2014, where renovations, which commenced almost immediately after the sale, are nearing completion (and according to reports, they’ve been done right). Word is that the house is about to head back to the market—at more than twice its winter selling price.

Find out why 375 people waited in the cold for the first open house

Daily Link Fix

  • Starting next month you can claim your .NYC domain!
  • Booklyn is as cool as Brooklyn. According to the New York Post, a group of book-boosting artists from Booklyn Artists Alliance (spelled with no “r”) is suing the new mobile-library nonprofit Booklyn Shuttle over unauthorized use of its name.
  • City Lab reports on why it’s important that people in charge of public transit be required to ride it. Some board members don’t even know what bus and train lines run near their homes.
  • Described by Fast Company as “Minecraft for real life”, BLOCK is a new video game developed by the University of Southern California’s School of Architecture that has the potential to impact real life urban design.

.NYC domains (right); Booklyn Shuttle (left)

Brooklyn, Bushwick, Polls

Yesterday, we reported that Vogue listed Bushwick as the 7th coolest neighborhood in the world. The article claims that few places garner as much global attention as the Brooklyn ‘hood. And while we don’t doubt Anna Wintour’s editorial chops, we want to know what you think.

Images: Shawn Hoke via photopin cc & Susan NYC via photopin cc

Green Design, Technology

You May be Able to Print Your Own Solar Panels Soon

By Dana Schulz, Wed, September 10, 2014

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , September 10, 2014

Are you one of the many eagerly awaiting the iPhone 6 and iWatch? Well, pretty soon, you may be able to print your very own solar panel to serve as an energy-generating skin or case for your new device.

Scientists at CSIRO, Australia’s national science agency, along with those at Melbourne and Monash universities, report that they hope to offer the printed solar panels for low-power applications within the next few years. Printed on plastic–and faster, cheaper, and easier to use than traditional silicon panels–they could mean big things for a gadget-obsessed world, as well as for simple building and design applications.

More on the technology here

Chelsea, Cool Listings, Interiors, Quirky Homes, West Village 

Whimsical Chelsea Duplex with Hot Tub Asks $3.9 Million

By Aisha Carter, Wed, September 10, 2014

  • By Aisha Carter
  • , September 10, 2014

There’s something about the grotto-esque garden duplex at 121 West 15th Street that makes us feel like we just stepped into a Disney movie. Perhaps it’s the soft edges and delightfully crooked banisters, or the whimsical fireman’s pole—yes, there’s a fireman’s pole. Whatever the case, this magical apartment may not be “the happiest place on earth,” but it will undoubtedly put a smile on your face.

Take a look inside here

Downtown Brooklyn, New Developments

  • By Diane Pham
  • , September 9, 2014

Lovers of cheescake, rejoice! Downtown Brooklyn’s Junior’s diner will stay put. According to the New York Times, the restaurant’s owner, Alan Rosen, has turned away all offers for the space located at the corner of Flatbush Avenue Extension and Dekalb Avenue. Rosen put the property on the market back in February and, unsurprisingly, was met with plenty of interest from hungry developers looking to build luxury condos atop site. After a summer of sleepless nights and much agonizing over his decision, Rosen has shot down the offers, including a whopping $45 million bid. Why? Sentimental value.

More on Rosen’s heartfelt decision

Featured Story

Crown Heights, Features, Interviews, Lower East Side, New Yorker Spotlight, People

  • By Diane Pham
  • , September 9, 2014

Plenty of new restaurants and bars have been popping up on the Lower East Side over the last few years, but one of the more recent standout eateries to appear is Black Tree. This Brooklyn transplant has only been around for a little more than a year, but their incredible menu has drawn in everyone from food critics at the Wall Street Journal and Zagat to Guy Fieri—who by the way can be seen dusting Black Tree sandwich crumbs from his goatee in an episode of Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives.

We recently caught up with Mac Sillick and Sandy Hall, the owners and culinary creatives behind the delicious Downtown venture, to chat about their business. Find out about their “farm to sandwich” approach, why they only use locally sourced food, and why they moved their business from Crown Heights to the Lower East Side.

**GIVEAWAY**: The fellas are also offering up one lucky reader ‘drinks for two’ at the Black Tree bar. Keep reading to find out how you can enjoy some organic cocktails on the house!

The interview and giveaway here

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