MORE TOP STORIES

Featured Story

Features, Interviews, New Yorker Spotlight, People, Upper West Side 

  • By Susan Cohen
  • , August 8, 2014

Years ago, shoemaking was a family business handed down from one generation to the next. And while there may not be as many old school shoemakers practicing their craft in the city today, there is the Wasserman family and their Upper West Side shoe store. Tip Top Shoes, located on 72nd between Amsterdam and Columbus, has been taking care of New York’s footwear needs since it first opened in 1940. Although the Wassermans are not the original owners, it’s been in the family since Danny Wasserman’s father purchased the store fifty years ago, continuing a family tradition that began in Europe.

When Danny began working alongside his father, he was the third generation in the shoe business. His son and daughter are now the fourth. Together, Danny and his children are making sure customers have access to both classic shoes and the latest trends. Wearing a pair of Birkenstocks I purchased at Tip Top Shoes, I met with Danny to learn more about the family business.

Read our full interview with Danny

Interiors, Park Slope, Recent Sales

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , August 8, 2014

Last week we learned that Opening Ceremony cofounder Carol Lim picked up a $3.43 million Prospect Heights townhouse, and it looks like her partner Humberto Leon got a bit of apartment envy, because he too just purchased a brownstone in nearby Park Slope.

The two fashion magnates met 19 years ago at the University of California, Berkeley and have been joined at the hip ever since, turning their brand into an international destination for streetwise style. So it’s no wonder that their homes share a few similarities; both are four stories, have picturesque backyard spaces, and retain a good amount of historic details. According to city records, Leon nabbed his new digs at 758 Union Street for the asking price of $2.85 million.

Read more

Featured Story

Architecture, Cool Listings, Features, History

  • By Lauren Price
  • , August 7, 2014

In the 1970s, after obtaining landmark status in 1969, three 19th century houses were actually towed by truck from a no-longer-existing stretch of Washington Street to avoid demolition in the Washington Market Urban Renewal area (a 38-acre site planned by the city’s Housing and Development Administration during the 1960s and 1970s, 10 blocks north of what would become the World Trade Center). Their final destination? Next to three already existing townhouses on Harrison Street, a quiet site that was once the well-known farm of alleged skirt lifter, and one of NYC’s first settlers, Annetje Jans. In 1976, New York City put them up for sale (from $35,000 to $75,000) following a restoration by Oppenheimer, Brady & Vogelstein the year before. And more recently, nearly four decades after the sale, CORE brokers Tom Postilio and Mickey Conlon exclusively listed 37 Harrison Street with surprising results.

Fast forward to present day to find out what happened to The Wilson Hunt House

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, Green Design

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , August 7, 2014

Radiant Orchid may be Pantone’s color of the year, but here in New York City we think green is the hot hue of the moment. Eco-friendly design features and sustainable buildings are sprouting up faster than ever, and buyers are seeking out the next best green amenity, from Vitamin C-filtered showers to electric vehicle charging stations. And thanks to some A-list support from the likes of Leonardo DiCaprio, environmentally friendly design is being embraced by developers and real estate professionals alike.

Last week, we took a look at Battery Park City, the largest green neighborhood in the world, which is often credited with launching New York City’s modern sustainable movement. And now we’re exploring some of the latest eco-friendly buildings to follow in its footsteps and take advantage of contemporary environmental technologies.

Read about these green developments here

Real Estate Wire

  • 14 new proposals were unveiled for Pier 6 at Brooklyn Bridge Park yesterday, and despite local outrage over the development’s inclusion of affordable housing, the project will move ahead. [Curbed]
  • 5Pointz site owners Jerry Wolkoff and his son David have released images of the space they’ve reserved for graffiti art. But will artists abide to the limitations? [NYDN]
  • Architect Gene Kaufman has designed a black “boutique stylist hotel” temporarily called ‘Prime Hotel’ for 17 West 24th Street. [CO]
  • A Goldman Sach’s investment banking chief sells off his Park Avenue pad for $17.45M [NYO]
  • Greenland, of Greenland Forest City Ratner, plans to invest as much as $8 billion in new projects overseas this year, and it’s eyeing large projects in U.S. cities. [TRD]
  • Bethany Frankel is apartment hunting in Chelsea. [TRD]

The 5Pointz replacement walls (left); BIG’s proposal for Brooklyn Bridge Park (right)

Architecture, Getting Away, Green Design

  • By Ana Lisa Alperovich
  • , August 7, 2014

Perched atop an upland meadow in Guilford, Connecticut is a charming wooden guesthouse growing lush, fluffy moss on its roof. Designed by Gray Organschi Architecture, the Cottage is a small but brilliant dwelling, designed to optimize the visual and environmental qualities of the area. Featuring panoramic views of the Long Island Sound and Thimble Islands, this tranquil shelter is a successful experiment in architecture and sustainable design.

Learn more about this green-roofed guesthouse here

Interiors, Nolita, Recent Sales

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , August 7, 2014

Beatrice Trussardi does much more than sit alongside the runways at Fashion Week. In addition to running the internationally successful, Italian fashion label Trussardi that her late father Nicola Trussardi founded, she heads the Nicola Trussardi Foundation, a nonprofit that promotes contemporary art and culture. And now she can add “New York City homeowner” to her roster of titles.

Ms. Trussardi just snatched up unit 3K at 240 Centre Street, the historic landmark known as the Police Building, for $2,147,500, according to city records. The one-bedroom Nolita apartment is chic and contemporary, and we’d expect no less for such a fashion-forward gal.                    

Check out the fashionable digs

Architecture, Design, Hotels, Places to Stay, Restaurants, Upstate

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , August 7, 2014

There’s so much talk these days about the happenings up in Beacon, New York, from the Dia:Beacon, undoubtedly the area’s biggest attraction, to the locally sourced restaurants lining the Hudson. And if you’re hoping to make this upstate getaway longer than just a day trip, the Roundhouse at Beacon Falls can accommodate much more than just your overnight stay.

Aryeh Siegel, unofficial “architect of Beacon,” was enlisted by developer Robert A. McAlpine to restore and adaptively resue the buildings on this 9-acre, 19th century industrial site located on the Fishkill Creek. They were transformed into a complex including a hotel, restaurant, and event space. Historically appropriate, modern private residences were added, and the former power house is being reconstructed to provide hydro-electric power, which will account for 60% of the hotel’s energy. The Rockwell Group outfitted the hotel and restaurant interiors with a contemporary yet rustic design esthetic, incorporating pieces from local artisans.

Take a tour through this gorgeous getaway

Daily Link Fix

  • A Map That Shows The Languages Spoken In NYC, Excluding Spanish: Unsurprisingly, the languages spoken in the city are just as diverse as the people. Take a look at Business Insider’s alternative map that shows the most common languages spoken, besides Spanish.
  • The Secret Behind The Billboard Next To Macy’s: Maybe you avoid Herald Square (we don’t blame you), but next time you’re dragged in the area, take a good look at the billboard that takes an entire corner Macy’s block on the east side. Untapped Cities reveals the history of the completely separate piece of land.
  • Overheated Subway Station Turn Into A Spa: Improv Everywhere is at it again. Mashable reports this time they transformed the 34th Street train platform into a pop-up spa complete with a massage and steam center. All we have to say is that it took guts to sit on those benches with just a towel on…
  • A Bodega Filled with Felt: We hope that never happens to your store, but artist Lucy Sparrow created a unique art installation in a London cornershop. She crafted felt replicas of everything you’d find in a bodega: beer, condoms, Spam, condiments, snacks. Though not noted on Ignant, we wonder if there was a bodega cat too.

Images: Map by Business Insider (left); Image courtesy of Untapped Cities via Flickr by Phil Davis (right)

maps, Social Media, Technology

  • By Stephanie Hoina
  • , August 7, 2014

Social media has certainly made it easier to take a nostalgic look back in time; a quick perusal of one’s past Facebook statuses or Twitter feeds is all it takes to remind us of what we were doing last week, month, or even last year. (Yes, we know some of those photos are cringe-worthy; we have them too.) Consider all of the different places those statuses and tweets were generated from, and imagine what it might look like if you tracked all of those locations on a map of the city – a literal “walk” down memory lane, if you will.

That’s exactly what Dutch graphic designer Vincent Meertens and his girlfriend did between March 2012 and January 2013, using an application called OpenPaths. The result? An intricate series of dots and lines (10,760 data points in all) representing all of their movements through New York City.

More details ahead

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