Urban Design

Design, Events, Queens, Urban Design

Queensway Connection, NYC design competition, Queensway, Make It! Grow It!

Earlier this year, AIA New York’s ENYA (Emerging New York Architects) Committee held its biennial design ideas competition, focusing on the elevated viaduct portion of the QueensWay, a community-led project that seeks to transform a blighted, 3.5 mile stretch of abandoned railway in Central Queens into a linear park and cultural greenway. The winners of Queensway Connection: Elevating the Public Realm were announced in February, and are now going public tomorrow, July 17th, with an exhibition at AIANY’s Center for Architecture.

There were 120 entries from 28 countries for Queensway Connection, from which four winning entries and an Honorable Mention were selected. The jury included architecture, landscape architecture, public space, and transportation infrastructure professionals who reviewed the designs based on how well they created an effective and welcoming transition between the street and greenway. Other factors included community involvement, preservation of the existing infrastructure, and use of ecologically sustainable elements.

Your sneak peek before tomorrow’s event

maps, Technology, Urban Design

As New Yorkers we’re constantly on the go and our movements are very much the pulse of the city. A new smartphone app developed by Human is tracking these movements and turning them into an incredible map that beautifully visualizes how we navigate our streets. Are you part of the pack?

Find out more here

Major Developments, Urban Design

320 Kent Avenue, Shop architects, shop designs, domino sugar factory brooklyn, Shop Domino Sugar Factory

The transformation of the Domino Sugar Refinery is moving full steam ahead with Two Trees Development filing their first permits for their 36-story SHoP-designed tower at 320 Kent Avenue. The 401-foot glass tower will be one of the tallest of the mega development, sited alongside the Williamsburg Bridge.

More on the tower here

Events, Starchitecture, Urban Design

rafael vinoly, nyc skyline, rafael vinoly nyc

There are skyscrapers going up left and right all over Manhattan, and in the race to build the loftiest and the glassiest, big name developers are seeking out even bigger name architects to brand their supertalls with iconic designs. As part of their ongoing Palaces for the People: Guastavino and the Art of Structural Tile seriesthe Museum of the City of New York will be hosting what’s sure to be a riveting panel in which several of the world’s leading architects and engineers will be discussing how they approach the design and construction challenges that come with building 100 stories and up.

Details on how to attend here

Architecture, Midtown West, New Developments, Urban Design

Herald Square, Herald Square H&M, LED billboards

Billboard signs along Times Square, and now Herald Square, are growing ever bigger and brighter as LED displays become the top choice for developers of new supersigns. Projects such as the upcoming Mariott Edition, Vornado‘s Marriott Marquis renovation, and the revamping of the Herald Center all include LED displays that will be among the largest in the world.

Though more expensive to install than the standard illuminated billboard, the light-emitting diode canvasses have the primary advantage of being eco-friendly by using less electricity and lasting 25 times longer than their incandescent alternatives. Their cost depends on size, complexity, and resolution; and may run upward of $1000 a square foot. But new technology in the past decade has cut the average price in half allowing for a brighter and more prolific future in the city.

See videos and images these eye-popping supersigns

Urban Design

The Sterling Mason Courtyard

Forget the legendary and uber-privileged access to the oasis known as Gramercy Park. The newest wave of private gardens are apparently so exclusive even residents can’t enjoy a stroll through the lush greenery.

Take the 2,400-square-foot courtyard currently being designed at The Sterling Mason, a new Tribeca loft building where an apartment can set you back up to $24 million. In a city where even the tiniest bit of green space is viewed as the ultimate amenity, turning what would have been a barren airshaft into a verdant outdoor sanctuary seems like a terrific idea. Tapping Deborah Nevins, one of the world’s most sought-after landscape designers to do it, an even better one. Keeping residents from enjoying more than a visual inspection of the rich white blossoms, lush green leaves, ivy walls and sculptural stream? Eh, we’re not so sure about that.

What’s up with this off limits trend?

Architecture, Downtown Brooklyn, New Developments, Rentals, Urban Design

388 Schermerhorn Street, Dattner Architects, Brooklyn, skyscraper, Downtown Brooklyn

L to R: Williamsburg Savings Bank (One Hanson), The Brooklyner, 388 Bridge Street, Avalon Willoughby West, The Hub

Construction filings from the Department of Buildings have revealed that Douglas Steiner’s mixed use tower at 333 Schermerhorn Street, dubbed the Hub, will soar 30 feet higher than previously reported; making it the top contender for Brooklyn’s tallest building at 607-feet.

For more than 80 years, the title of Brooklyn’s tallest belonged to the 512-foot Williamsburg Savings Bank tower at 1 Hanson Place. With its beloved 4-sided clock tower and its majestic banking hall, the tower has stood in relative isolation since its construction in 1929. Bruce Ratner’s Atlantic Yards centerpiece building nicknamed “Miss Brooklyn,” was the first to challenge the tower’s dominance and was slated to soar more than 100-feet above the bank building’s dome. The proposal incited uproar from Brooklynites, leading to its eventual downsizing in 2006 to 511-feet, just one foot shorter than the neighboring bank building.

More about The Hub and Brooklyn’s tallest this way

Architecture, Urban Design

BIG's W57th

The Van Alen Institute has convened its new International Council of architecture, planning, and design leaders in Venice, Italy during the Biennale this month.  The inaugural group represents 13 firms from across more than 17 cities and ten countries.  Five of these Council members have offices in NYC — Allied Works Architecture, BIG (Bjarke Ingels Group), Jan Gehl Architects, Pei Cobb Freed & Partners, and Snohetta.

More details here

Brooklyn, Major Developments, Urban Design

Brooklyn Navy Yard, Navy Yard, Brooklyn Navy Yard Expansion, David Ehrenberg, Crye AMerican, modern industrial park, industrial parks nyc, made in new york

Over the years, the Brooklyn Navy Yard has become a modern manufacturing pole, and it has grown to host spaces for everyone from furniture makers to photographers to even financial services companies. Demand for space has grown tremendously, and in response, the Navy Yard has announced plans to create another 1.8 million square feet of space for both future and current tenants looking to grow their businesses.

More of what’s in store this way

Architecture, Urban Design

Blayne Ross fake beach hudson rive nyc

Will New York City be taking a cue from Paris Plages?

Living in the city doesn’t mean giving up the pleasures of nature — at least that’s how Blayne Ross sees it. The entrepreneur, along with his buddies Matt Berman and Andrew Kotchen of workshop/apd and Nathaniel Stanton of Craft Engineering, have conjured up a plan that will bring an artificial beach to a site on the Hudson River by 2016. The new “beach” would boast a food court, retail, and apparently a surf shop in case you forget your bathing suit (assuming you’re brave enough to take a dip in the Hudson).

More on the project here

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