Transportation

Featured Story

Features, Financial District, History, Transportation

Photo © James and Karla Murray

When the New York City subway opened on October 27th, 1904, it was the magnificent City Hall station that served as the backdrop for the festivities, with its arched Guastavino-tiled ceiling and skylights. But by 1945, the newer, longer subway cars could no longer fit on the station’s curved tracks, so it was closed. Today, the New York City Transit Museum occasionally offers tours of the abandoned station, which is how photographers James and Karla Murray were able to capture these beautiful photos. Ahead, see more of the station and learn all about its history.

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Featured Story

Features, History, Transportation, Video, Washington Heights

All photos and video © James and Karla Murray

The deepest subway station in New York City lies 173 feet below ground (18 stories!) at the 191st Street stop of the 1 train. This stop is also known for the 1,000-foot-long tunnel that connects its station at St. Nicholas Avenue to an entrance on Broadway. Called “Tunnel Street,” this is technically the only underground street in the city. For years, however, it was a dark and dingy passageway that troubled locals, so about six years ago, the city commissioned six artists to paint the tunnel with colorful murals. Ahead, photographers James and Karla Murray give us a video tour of the tunnel, along with the insanely deep subway station. Read more

New Jersey, Transportation

Photo courtesy of Lyft

It may soon be easier to bike between two waterfront New Jersey cities. Hoboken Mayor Ravi Bhalla and Jersey City Mayor Steve Fulop announced on Wednesday plans to roll out a joint bike share program run by Citi Bike that will be compatible in both neighborhoods. Previously, the neighboring cities had agreements with two separate bike-share companies, which gave riders traveling between the areas nowhere to dock. Members of the program will be able to rent Citi Bikes in New York at no additional cost.

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Policy, Transportation

Sally Librera, Senior Vice President of Subways, distributing free face masks to transit customers on July 23; Photo: Marc A. Hermann / MTA New York City Transit on Flickr

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority on Sunday asked Apple to develop a more simplistic face-recognition system to prevent riders from removing face coverings to unlock their smartphones while commuting. An update to the company’s Face ID feature is currently in the works, but in a letter to CEO Tim Cook, MTA Chair Pat Foye requested the technology be expedited. “We urge Apple to accelerate the deployment of new technologies and solutions that further protect customers in the era of COVID-19,” Foye wrote, according to the Associated Press.

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City Living, Transportation

MTA installs free mask dispensers inside buses

By Dana Schulz, Thu, July 30, 2020

Photo: Marc A. Hermann / MTA New York City Transit

In a continued effort to COVID-proof public transportation, the MTA has installed mask dispensers at the entrance to city buses. The pilot program is now on 100 buses in the Bronx, Queens, and Staten Island, and it will expand to 400 buses in all five boroughs by next month. The free surgical mask dispensers–each of which holds 50 masks and will be refilled daily–are mounted at the front door of express buses and at the front and rear doors of SBS and local buses. Masks are required to ride any bus or subway.

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Policy, Transportation

Photo courtesy of Revel

Electric moped company Revel is suspending service in New York City after two riders died within two weeks, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced on Tuesday. A 32-year-old man was killed in Queens early Tuesday morning after crashing the scooter into a light pole. CBS New York reporter Nina Kapur died earlier this month after being thrown off the Revel moped onto the street in Greenpoint. “Revel has made the decision to shut down their service for the time being and that is the right thing to do,” the mayor said during a press briefing. “No one should be running a business that is not safe. Unfortunately, this has been proven to be not safe.”

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Policy, Transportation

Photo courtesy of city’s Department of Transportation on Flickr

While the city is adding just under two miles of open streets to its roster of car-free blocks, nearly three miles will be removed from the program. Mayor Bill de Blasio on Friday announced 1.72 miles of open streets across the five boroughs, as well as a new initiative called “Play Streets,” which will offer families a number of contactless activities, sports, and arts and crafts on 12 streets currently closed to cars. However, the mayor failed to mention during the press briefing that 2.77 miles will be cut from the program and returned to normal vehicle traffic at “underused locations.”

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Policy, Transportation

Photo: Patrick Cashin / MTA New York City Transit

In May, for the first time in its history, the New York City subway system shut down overnight as part of a nightly disinfection plan to kill traces of the coronavirus on trains and buses. To ensure the subway resumes 24/7 service, seen as an integral part of the city that never sleeps’ DNA, the State Senate on Thursday passed legislation that would require nonstop subway service when a state of emergency is not in effect.

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Technology, Transportation

Screenshots taken from the MTmta app

Many New Yorkers are having to start heading back to the office, and part of that anxiety is how they get there. For some, that means switching from the subway to the bus in search of more social distance. In fact, the New York Times recently reported that in April and May, bus ridership in NYC was higher than that of the subway for the first time in more than 50 years. And for those making the switch, it just got a lot simpler to feel at ease. The MYmta app now includes real-time data for the number of passengers on an arriving bus.

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Transportation

Photo by Patrick Cashin courtesy of MTA via Flickr

After one year of service disruptions, the much-talked-about L train “slowdown” wrapped up in April. The MTA has now turned its attention to the F train’s Rutgers Tube, which is the last of 11 subway tunnels to be rebuilt after suffering damage from Superstorm Sandy in 2012. Using the same tactics as were employed for the L train, the Rutgers Tube will only be shut down on nights and weekends, affecting F train service from August 2020 through March 2021.

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