Transportation

Policy, Transportation

Via NYC Ferry

According to a report from the Citizens Budget Commission (CBC) “Swimming in Subsidies,” the three-year-old NYC Ferry transports fewer people in a year than the city’s subway moves in a day. But at about $10.37 per rider, the ferry’s operating subsidy is 10 times that of the New York City Transit system. And an expansion of the system was recently announced that will mean even higher public subsidies–as much as $24.75 per ride for the Coney Island route. Why the steep subsidies? First, operating costs are high due to long routes and leisure-oriented ridership. And revenue is low because fares are tied to subway and bus fares.

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Transportation

new york transit museum, ny yankees, nostalgia ride

Photo courtesy of the New York Transit Museum

Baseball fans headed to the New York Yankees home opener this week can arrive in the Bronx via a transportation method almost as old as the team itself. On Thursday, the New York Transit Museum is rolling out its 1917 IRT Lo-V train to run from Grand Central to 161st-Street Yankee Stadium, allowing Bronx-bound passengers to travel back in time before officially kicking off the 2019 baseball season.

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Policy, Transportation

L TRAIN, NYC SUBWAY, L TRAIN SHUTDOWN

Via Flickr

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority has chosen a consultant to oversee the reconstruction of the 100-year-old L train tunnel, the Wall Street Journal reported Thursday. The agency tapped JMT of NY Inc. to review construction timelines and safety and environmental concerns for the never-been-done-before project. After Gov. Andrew Cuomo intervened earlier this year, the MTA revised its original Carnasie Tunnel repair plan to not require the L train to shut down for 15 months, but instead have construction work take place on nights and weekends. But the $1.2 million contract–which must be approved by the MTA board next week–does not include a review of the feasibility of the updated L train plan before construction is set to begin on April 27.

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Brooklyn, navy yard, Transportation

Brooklyn Navy Yard via Optimus 

Self-driving vehicles are officially coming to New York City this year. The Boston-based startup Optimus Ride announced on Wednesday plans to deploy a fleet of autonomous shuttle vans to the Brooklyn Navy Yard, a 300-acre site in the midst of transforming from a World War II-era warship site to a modern tech-hub. When it launches in the second quarter of this year, the self-driving program will be the first of its kind in New York, according to the company.

Learn about it here

Events, Transportation

St. Patrick's Day Parade

Image via Flickr

The city will soon be looking very green as 150,000 marchers and two million spectators come together for the annual St. Patrick’s Day parade. Bagpipers, marching bands and more will make their way from Midtown to the Upper East Side, as the oldest and largest St. Patrick’s Day Parade in the world celebrates its 257th year. This year’s parade will take place on Saturday, the day before St. Patrick’s Day, because March 17 falls on a Sunday. Read on for more details, how to avoid traffic, and how public transit will be affected.

Know before you go

Greenpoint, Transportation

Greenpoint Avenue, MTA

Image via Wikimedia

The MTA is moving into the next phase of construction on the elevator installation project at the Greenpoint Avenue G station, but there’s good news for roughly 9,400 regular weekday customers: the MTA is expecting “significantly reduced impact” to service. Work will also focus on updating station infrastructure including stairs, handrails, turnstiles, powered gates, and braille signage—bringing the station to full ADA compliance.

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Brooklyn, Transportation

Via Wikimedia

Adding another perspective to the many voices who are seeking a solution to the “most challenging project not only in New York City but arguably in the United States,” City Comptroller Scott Stringer has outlined his own proposal to save the crumbling BQE, advocating for a middle-ground solution to the heated debate. Stringer’s idea (notably without a timeline or proposed budget) is to turn the BQE into a truck-only highway and build a linear park above. “We remain hopeful that the agency can view the BQE’s deterioration not just as an engineering challenge, but as an opportunity to create something new and bold that both accommodates essential traffic and enhances surrounding neighborhoods,” he wrote in a March 7 letter to Department of Transportation Commissioner Polly Trottenberg.

See the new plan

Transportation

Image via Wikipedia

The Astoria Blvd N and W station in Queens will close at 10 p.m. on Sunday, March 17 and remain shuttered for nine months as New York City Transit works on a multi-phase repair project. The elevated station will get four new elevators and other accessibility features. In order to construct the street elevators, the mezzanine level will be demolished and rebuilt with more vertical clearance to prevent strikes by trucks and other over-height vehicles on the road below.

More info

Transportation

Photo courtesy of Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s office.

Despite a meeting in November to discuss the Gateway project, President Donald Trump has made it clear that the 2020 federal budget doesn’t specify an money for the much-needed rail tunnel under the Hudson River. U.S. Department of Transportation Deputy Secretary Jeffrey Rosen told reporters Monday that, “Those transit projects are local responsibilities, and elected officials from New York and New Jersey are the ones accountable for them.” Gov. Andrew Cuomo replied in a statement, “These ridiculous claims should not be taken seriously,” calling the exclusion of funds for the project “political posturing.”

200,000 daily commuters hope somebody figures it out

Bronx, Transportation

Photo via Flickr

On Wednesday U.S. District Court Judge Edgardo Ramos ruled that the MTA was in violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act for failing to install elevators when it renovated a Bronx subway station. The ruling is the result of a 2016 lawsuit initiated by Bronx Independent Living Services after the MTA refused to make a the Middletown Road elevated subway station in the Bronx wheelchair accessible, though the $27 million renovation included new floors, walls, ceilings and stairs to the street and the train platform, Gothamist reports. Ramos’ ruling stated that the MTA is obligated to install an elevator, regardless of cost, unless it is technically infeasible.

Really, MTA?

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