Transportation

Transportation

MTA, NYC subway, phone scanner

Via Phil Hollenback/Flickr

The board of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority voted in February to increase the fares for weekly and monthly MetroCards while eliminating the pay-per-ride bonus. This Sunday, April 21, the price of a monthly pass will rise from $121 to $127 and a weekly pass from $32 to $33, as reported by amNY. The base fare will remain at $2.75.

More on the fare hike

Transportation

Starting Friday, April 26 through the summer of 2020, L train service will be suspended on weeknights and weekends. The halt of train service is part of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority’s revised plan to repair the Canarsie Tunnel, proposed by Gov. Andrew Cuomo in January as an alternative to shuttering the line completely. While the L train will run normally during peak times for the next year and a half, service on the line will be reduced starting as early as 8 p.m. on weekdays. To ease the impending headache for commuters, the MTA has released a map that shows service alternatives, transfer points, and planned wait times for the L train.

Get the scoop

Transportation

Bedford L Train

Via Flickr

Ahead of the revised partial shutdown happening at the end of the month, the L train is shutting down. Starting Monday, April 15, the line will not run for 10 weeknights between Manhattan and Brooklyn from 10:30 p.m. to 5 a.m., Monday through Friday. The shuttered service allows the Metropolitan Transportation Authority to install signal equipment to prepare for rehabilitation work on the Canarsie Tunnel set to begin April 27, as amNY reported.

Get the l train low down

Policy, Transportation

Image via Wiki Commons

The New York & Atlantic Railway, a little-known freight line that runs through Brooklyn and Queens, is set to receive a significant investment as part of ongoing strategies to relieve congestion in the city, the New York Times reports. Currently, the city’s rail lines only transport two percent of New York’s cargo, while trucks carry about 90 percent. One rail car can carry the equivalent of four trucks, so they could represent a previously “unsung” key to diverting truck traffic, a major contributor to the city’s ongoing battle with gridlock.

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Brooklyn, Policy, Transportation

Photo via Flickr

A study examining the feasibility of extending Brooklyn’s Utica Avenue subway line has finally launched, NY1 reported. As part of the Utica Avenue Transit Improvement Study, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority and the city will look into extending the 3 and 4 train south of Eastern Parkway in Crown Heights to neighborhoods like East Flatbush and Marine Park. Funding for the study has been in place since 2015 when Mayor Bill de Blasio designated $5 million for it as part of his One NYC plan.

Details this way

New Jersey, Policy, Transportation

Via Flickr

As details like discounts and transit perks are discussed in the wake of New York’s newly approved plan to levy a congestion fee on vehicles entering Manhattan’s business district south of 61st Street, New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy has voiced objections to the plan, saying it it could be unfair to New Jersey residents, the Wall Street Journal reportsAccording to the New York Post, commuter rail discounts are on the way for New York City residents coming from areas–such as some in northeast Queens–not served by subways, where the MTA agreed to knock 20 percent–$45–off monthly passes for LIRR commuters entering and leaving Penn Station. The MTA will also invest $3 million for express bus service from Queens to Midtown.

What’s the problem here?

Brooklyn, Transportation, Urban Design

Bjarke Ingels reveals new proposal for a park-covered BQE

By Alexandra Alexa, Thu, April 4, 2019

Bjarke Ingels Group, BQE

Rendering courtesy of Bjarke Ingels Group

The latest proposal to fix the crumbling BQE comes from Bjarke Ingels Group, who unveiled their plan to a crowd of 1,000 at a town hall meeting hosted by the Brooklyn Heights Association and advocacy group A Better Way last night. Dubbed the BQP—with the P standing for Park—the firm wants to build a new, six-lane highway that would be topped by a public park, saving the promenade and expanding Brooklyn Bridge Park by more than 10 acres. The proposal comes on the heels of Mayor de Blasio hitting the brakes on a $3 billion DOT plan and instead convening a “panel of experts” to determine the best path forward.

Get all the details

Policy, Transportation, Urban Design

BQE, DOT, Brooklyn heights promenade, Regional Plan association, bqe redesign

Image: Wikimedia cc.

A report released today by civic think tank Regional Plan Organization highlights options for the impending Brooklyn-Queens Expressway reconstruction that would appear to upend conventional highway reconstruction policy. The new report suggests that the DOT could actually reduce the number of lanes needed when redesigning the expressway’s 1.5-mile “Triple Cantilever” under the historic Brooklyn Heights Promenade, in addition to looking at congestion pricing, HOV restrictions and two-way tolling for the Verrazano Bridge. The demand management policies outlined contain both immediate benefits–like eliminating the need to block access to the historic Brooklyn Heights Promenade–and long-term rewards like reducing pollution.

Fewer highways, less traffic?

Policy, Transportation

Image by Joe Mazzola via Wikimedia Commons

After a fare increase that went into effect this past weekend, the Verrazzano–Narrows Bridge is now the most expensive bridge to cross in the country, the New York Post reports. The cost to take the Verrazzano from Brooklyn to Staten Island is now $19, up from $17. Drivers with an E-ZPass will be charged a lower rate of $12.24, up from $11.52. Staten Island drivers, however, will be spared the price increase and only have to pay $5.50 under a new rebate program. The cost in that direction was slated to increase to $6 but at the last minute Gov. Andrew Cuomo and the state Legislature put up $6 million a year to keep the tolls low for folks living on the Forgotten Borough.

More info

Policy, Transportation

Via Flickr

Drivers traveling in the busiest parts of Manhattan will be charged an extra fee under a new initiative approved by state lawmakers Sunday. The first of its kind in the country, the “Central Business District Tolling” program installs electronic tolling devices on the perimeter of a zone that covers all neighborhoods south of 60th Street in the borough, with the exception of the West Side Highway and FDR Drive. While details for the program remain unclear, including how much it will cost drivers, the congestion fees will not be implemented until 2021.

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