Transportation

Design, Midtown, New Developments, Transportation

See inside the new light-filled Moynihan Train Hall

By Devin Gannon, Wed, December 30, 2020

Photo © Max Touhey

As one of the few bright spots during a very dark time in New York, the new Moynihan Train Hall opens to the public on Friday. The new transit hub expands Penn Station into the landmarked James A. Farley Post Office Building on Eighth Avenue, increasing capacity at the busiest railroad station in the country by 50 percent. On Wednesday, Gov. Andrew Cuomo celebrated the opening of Moynihan Train Hall, which was inspired by the design of the original Penn Station that was demolished in the 1960s. Ahead, get a look inside the new train hall, including the 92-foot-high massive skylights that total one acre and the new waiting areas for the Long Island Rail Road and Amtrak.

Get the details

New Developments, Transportation

NYC’s new Moynihan Train Hall will open January 1

By Devin Gannon, Mon, December 28, 2020

Credit: SOM/ Office of Governor Cuomo on Flickr

The long-awaited new Moynihan Train Hall will be completed on December 31 with trains operating the next day, Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced on Sunday. The $1.6 billion project expands the existing Penn Station into the historic James A. Farley Post Office Building on Eighth Avenue and is part of a new mixed-use transit hub with office space and retail at the site. Named for the late U.S. Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan, the new train hall is expected to increase the cramped concourse space at Penn Station by 50 percent.

Find out more

City Living, Policy, Transportation

Photo by (vincent desjardins) on Flickr

Congress on Sunday reached an agreement on a $900 billion emergency coronavirus relief package, roughly nine months after the first stimulus was signed into law. The package is expected to provide one-time direct payments of $600 to most taxpayers and provide an additional $300 per week to those unemployed. In some positive news for New York, the stimulus deal also includes $4 billion to the Metropolitan Transportation Authority and the Save Our Stages bill, which provides funding for live performance venues, comedy clubs, and Broadway. Congress could vote on the package as early as Monday.

Learn more here

City Living, Transportation

A jet snow thrower in action via MTA’s Flickr

With a forecast of up to 18 inches of snow, Winter Storm Gail is expected to bring more snow to New York City this week than the five boroughs saw all of last year. In response to the nor’easter, expected to hit Wednesday afternoon, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority has activated its 24/7 command center to monitor the storm. The agency is prepared to clear subways, buses, and commuter railways of snow thanks to its fleet of super-powered snow throwers, jet-powered snow blowers, and specially designed de-icing cars to tackle the icy mess.

More this way

City Living, Policy, Transportation

Photo by Raidarmax on Wikimedia

A state lawmaker is calling for a new surcharge on packages delivered in New York City as a way to raise money for the cash-strapped Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Assembly Member Robert Carroll revived a bill he first introduced last February that would impose a $3 fee on all online delivery transactions, except for essential medical supplies and food. Facing its worst financial crisis in history because of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, the MTA has said without the $12 billion in aid from Congress it has requested, subway and bus service could be cut by 40 percent.

Learn more

Policy, Transportation

Photo credit: Billie Grace Ward via Flickr

Subway and bus service could be cut by 40 percent, thousands of workers laid off, unlimited MetroCards eliminated, and fares increased under a budget proposed by the Metropolitan Transportation on Wednesday as the agency faces the worst financial crisis in its history. The grim 2021 budget comes as the MTA faces a tremendous deficit amplified by the coronavirus pandemic, with no federal relief in sight. The agency on Wednesday projected a deficit of $15.9 billion through 2024.

Details here

Midtown, Transportation, Urban Design

Can Times Square ever be completely car-free?

By Devin Gannon, Tue, November 10, 2020

Rendering courtesy of 3deluxe

It’s been over ten years since cars were first banned in some sections of Times Square. Is it time for additional street closures along bustling Broadway? In a new design study, the Germany-based architecture firm 3deluxe has reimagined Times Square to prioritize pedestrians and cyclists, trading vehicular traffic lanes for recreational activities, landscaped features, and public transportation. The concept comes as New York and other cities continue to reexamine the value of safe public space as the fight to control the coronavirus pandemic continues.

Get the details

Policy, Transportation

Photo by Kevin Dellandrea on Unsplash

With the pandemic roaring around the nation and in nearby New Jersey and Connecticut, Governor Cuomo today announced that he’d be deploying additional National Guard and NYPD members to state airports to enforce the state’s COVID entry requirements as the holidays approach. In a conference call this morning with reporters, the governor said, “You should not land if you do not have proof of a negative test,” referring to the new travel rule that he announced on Monday, which says that most travelers who were in another state for more than 24 hours must obtain a test within three days of departure from that state.

Read more

Featured Story

City Living, Features, Transportation

Early voting at the Brooklyn Museum; © 6sqft

While over three million New Yorkers, including over one million residents in New York City, have already cast their ballots during the nine-day early voting period, millions more are expected to show up to vote on Tuesday. To help both voters and poll workers deal with possible long wait times and overall stress this Election Day, a number of companies are offering deals and freebies on November 3, from discounted rides to the polls to free food delivery.

Details here

History, Transportation

What it was like the day the NYC subway opened in 1904

By Emily Nonko, Tue, October 27, 2020

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Picture Collection, The New York Public Library. “City Hall Subway Station, New York” The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1906.

The Interborough Rapid Transit Subway, or IRT, was the first subway company ever in New York City. The company formed as a response to elevated train lines springing up around the city–it was time to go underground and build a rapid transit railroad to help combat street congestion and assist development in new areas of New York, according to NYCsubway.org. And so 116 years ago, on October 27th, 1904, the first IRT subway line opened with the City Hall station as its showpiece. It’s no overstatement to say that after this date, the city would never be the same. And the day was one to remember, with pure excitement over the impressive feat of moving the city’s transit system underground.

Here’s what you need to know about the day

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS

Thank you, your sign-up request was successful!
This email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Please provide a valid email address.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.