Transportation

Construction Update, Financial District, Major Developments, Transportation

One WTC, One World Trade Center, One WTC construction update, progress at One WTC

As many of you architecture buffs know, One WTC now rises a symbolic 1,776 feet, making it the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere and the third tallest in the entire world. Designed by renowned architect David Childs of Skidmore, Owings and Merrill, it also has a LEED Gold certification and is the most environmentally sustainable project of its size. After a temporary real estate slump, the 104-story, glass and steel building is now 56% leased, with big-time tenants like Conde Naste, Morgan Stanley, Legends Hospitality, and BMB Group. Eight years after construction began, One World Trade is at an exciting juncture with its tenants expected to move in by the end of the year, already beginning to build out their office spaces. The original crew of 10,000 has been reduced to 600, and we’re checking in on what these remaining workers are up to.

Check out some amazing photos of the progress at One WTC

Starchitecture, Transportation, Upstate

Filling up the ole’ gas tank is not a glamorous job, and usually not a task that leaves one marveling at the surrounding architecture.  But in 1927, Prairie-style extraordinaire Frank Lloyd Wright put together plans for a fuel filling station in Buffalo, New York that would leave even the most seasoned driver awe struck.

Now, almost 90 years later, the Buffalo Transportation Pierce-Arrow Museum has realized Wright’s vision and constructed the station as a one-of-a-kind installation housed in a 40,000-square-foot glass and steel atrium, made possible by a $6.3 million state grant. The arts-and-crafts gas station, the third Wright recreation in Buffalo, makes a nod to Native American design and thoughtfully mixes practicality with visual appeal.

Take a virtual tour of the architectural masterpiece

Green Design, Queens, Transportation, Urban Design, Woodside

Amoeba, organ, extraterrestrial creature — take your pick; this transportation hub dubbed the Urban Alloy Towers is quite interestingly shaped. The creation of Chad Kellogg and Matt Bowles of AMLGM, the structure is proposed for the area around where the LIRR station in Woodside, Queens links to the 7 train.

The idea came from the notion that large-scale housing development is most successful when located near transportation. So, Kellog and Bowles figured they’d put their development “directly on the intersections between surface and elevated train lines,” utilizing the remnant spaces surrounding the train infrastructure. Included in this multi-use structure would be live/work spaces, retail, small offices, both market-rate and luxury residential units, SROs, and a central atrium.

Read more about the design here

Architecture, Financial District, Starchitecture, Transportation

santiago calatrava, santiago calatrava nyc, new york architecure, santiago calatrava wtc, santiago calatrava world trade center, oculus transportation hub, oculus railway station, world trade center transportation hub, world trade center transportation, nyc world trade center

It’s unfortunate that Santiago Calatrava‘s original design for the WTC Transportation Hub got scrapped for a shrunken, more watered-down version. But the cost saving measures that transformed his beautiful “bird” into what some critics have dubbed as a “rack of lamb” didn’t completely destroy the majestic spirit of the original design.

Construction images recently released by the Port Authority of NY & NJ reveal that the Oculus is finally taking shape, emerging from its WTC site as something that could very well be quite iconic.

More incredible photos ahead

Archtober

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS

Thank you, your sign-up request was successful!
This email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Please provide a valid email address.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.