photography

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Features, GVSHP, History, photography, The urban lens

Carole Teller’s ‘Changing New York’ captures the city’s 20th-century transformation

By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, Mon, March 26, 2018

Washington Square Arch wrapped by artist Francis Hines, 1980 © Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation/Carole Teller

Change in New York is an expected norm, sometimes so constant it almost goes unnoticed. It’s such an ingrained part of the New Yorker’s experience, we often forget just how much our city has transformed, and what we have left behind. To help us remember, we have Carole Teller. A Brooklyn-born artist who’s lived in the East Village for over 50 years, Carole’s also a photographer with a keen eye for capturing defining elements of New York’s cityscape, especially those on the verge of change or extinction.

Fortunately for us, Carole kept the hundreds of pictures she took scouring the streets of NYC between the early 1960s and early 1990s. She recently unearthed them and shared them with the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation for inclusion in its online Historic Image Archive. What follows are just a few photos from what we call “Carole Teller’s Changing New York.”

See some of the most captivating photos

Featured Story

Features, History, photography, The urban lens

Carrie Boretz, street photography

50th Street and Lexington Avenue, 1980

6sqft’s series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. In this installment, Carrie Boretz shares photos from her “Street: New York City 70s, 80s, 90s“. Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

In New York’s bad old days, the city was a house of horrors, but it made for some incredible photos. Carrie Boretz was there through the decades, documenting the madness and the emotion, the cops lunching on park benches, the conversations on out-of-order payphones, the open-air wig stores, the famous and the unknown, all joined by the city and its streets. In her new book, “Street: New York City 70s, 80s, 90s,” these images line the pages in a nostalgic time warp to a glorious, if troubled, era. Boretz’s photos are currently on display through March 31st at Umbrella Arts on East 9th Street.

See New York when she burned

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Features, People, photography, The urban lens

Real People. Real Lives. Women Immigrants of New York., Dru Blumensheid, BUMESI, Queens Museum, New Women New Yorkers

Daniela, from Colombia © Dru Blumensheid

6sqft’s series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. In this installment, Dru Blumensheid shares some images from the Queens Museum‘s new exhibit Real People. Real Lives. Women Immigrants of New York. Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

“Statistics do not tell the story of immigration. People do. Women do.” This was the impetus behind the new photo and video exhibit at the Queens Museum, “Real People. Real Lives. Women Immigrants of New York.” A partnership between New Women New Yorkers, NYC’s only non-profit dedicated to empowering young immigrant women, and artist Dru Blumensheid aka BUMESI, the exhibit features photos and videos of 16 young immigrant women taken in iconic locations such as the Brooklyn Bridge and Chinatown, all as a way to show “a nuanced and multi-layered picture… of the barriers and isolation they experience, and of the hopes, dreams, and talents they bring with them.”

In celebration of Women’s History Month, 6sqft chatted with Dru Blumensheid about her personal inspiration behind the project, what she learned from the experience, and how she hopes all New Yorkers can benefit from hearing these stories.

Hear from Dru and see her beautiful photos and videos

Art, Lower East Side, photography

Photographers James and Karla Murray published their first account of small businesses in NYC a decade ago with their seminal book “Store Front: The Disappearing Face of New York,” which captured hundreds of mom-and-pops and their iconic facades, many of them since shuttered, along with interviews with the business owners. They’ve since published two follow-ups, “New York Nights” and “Store Front II-A History Preserved,” winning countless awards and gaining local and national fame for their documentation of a vanishing retail culture. And this summer, they’re bringing their work to a larger scale than ever. The Lo-Down reports that the husband-and-wife team has designed an art installation for Seward Park, a wood-frame structure that will feature four nearly life-size images of Lower East Side business that have disappeared–a bodega, a coffee shop/luncheonette (the recently lost Cup & Saucer), a vintage store, and a newsstand.

More details

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Features, History, photography, The urban lens

Pressroom. Numbering cast plates with page numbers for identification.

In September 1942, with humanity in the throes of WWII, one Marjory Collins photographed the inner workings of the New York Times for the U.S. Office of War Information. Her photos depict a culture of white men and machines working at individual tasks for the greater goal of creating the day’s paper. The press printing process shown is a world apart from today’s digital media industry, where so many human jobs have been antiquated by more advanced technology, which is, thankfully, more diverse.

See all the photos

Featured Story

Features, Harlem, photography, The urban lens

The Urban Lens: Documenting 20 years of Harlem architecture

By Hannah Frishberg, Fri, February 16, 2018

Harlem architecture, Harlem photography, Albert Vecerka

6sqft’s series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. In this installment, Albert Vecerka shares some images from his “Harlem project.” Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

After moving to New York in 1992 and earning a degree in architecture from City College, Yugoslavia-born photographer Albert Vecerka moved to Harlem and started documenting the neighborhood. Originally an attempt to dispel the notion that Harlem was “dangerous,” his “Harlem project,” also captures its architectural fabric and aesthetic changes over time. 6qft recently caught up with Vecerka to hear his thoughts on Harlem–what it was like 20 years ago and why he still calls it home.

See more photos and hear from Albert

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Art, Features, photography

Juan Jose Egusquiza, Impossible Landscapes, NYC photography

6sqft’s series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. In this installment, Juan Jose Egusquiza shares his “Impossible Landscapes” series. Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

Juan Jose Egusquiza describes himself as a “visual storyteller, image maker, and reality bender.” In his latest photo manipulation series titled “Impossible Landscapes,” he bends the reality of New York, a city that lent itself perfectly to the project since it’s constantly changing and being reimaged. From plopping Downtown’s skyscraper in the middle of the desert to adding a rushing river through Chinatown to inverting the entire skyline, Juan has created a view of NYC that inspires endless curiosity and stories. Ahead, see all of the images and learn a bit more from Juan about his process and inspiration.

Everything, this way

Featured Story

Features, photography, The urban lens

Subway Kiss #1 by Matt Weber

6sqft’s series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. In this installment, Matt Weber shares his “Urban Romance” series. Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

A born-and-bred Upper West Sider, photographer Matt Weber has been watching New York all his life, taking pictures of everything he can. Over the years, he accumulated many photos of love, or at least, public displays of affection. Though people are constantly kissing all over the world, there’s something especially gutsy, memorable, and nonchalantly confident in a subway kiss. For many, a quick peck or a full-on makeout session is among the least desirable things when you’re being crushed like a sardine, underground, in a moving metal tube. Yet, New Yorkers do it constantly – a documented fact.

Just in time for the most romantic day of the year, we had a chance to talk with Matt Weber about his photography, his “Urban Romance” series, and how New York has changed since he started capturing it.

See all the photos

Featured Story

Features, Harlem, History, photography, The urban lens

6sqft’s series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. In this installment, Katsu Naito shares his 1990s portraits from Harlem. Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

In 1983, when Katsu Naito immigrated to America at the age of 18, he spoke barely any English. Growing up in Maebashi, a small city about 90 miles north of Tokyo, he had never heard of Harlem before moving to New York but was drawn to the energy of the neighborhood, quickly realizing he wanted to document it with his camera. Now, more three decades since he first fell in love with Harlem, Naito’s photos of the ‘nabe’s residents in the early to mid-‘90ss are being published in a book and unintentional time capsule titled “Once in Harlem,” out now from TBW Books. 6sqft chatted with Naito about his journey and what makes Harlem so special to him, and he shared a collection of his amazing images.

See them all here

Featured Story

Features, photography, The urban lens

NYC aerial photography, Jeffrey Milstein, New York from above, Leaning out

5th Avenue/Midtown. Photo © Jeffrey Milstein

6sqft’s series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. In this installment, Jeffrey Milstein shares his amazing aerial photos. Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

In New York, it’s typical for tourists to look up and ogle the skyscrapers, while locals generally walk head down towards the pavement. So who then, is stereotyped as looking down upon the city from above? Gods, pilots, and photographers are among the limited answer options, and Jeffrey Milstein checks two of these boxes. He’s extensively photographed both aerial shots of cities and the aircrafts that allow him to do so.

Milstein’s series of NYC photos, “Leaning Out,” makes the city out to be more pattern than people. From his height, New York becomes a series of shapes, some quickly recognizable – the leafy expanse of Central Park, the top of a Macy’s Day float – others less so – the cheery tops of Coney Island’s amusements, the map-like expanse of the American Museum of Natural History. 6sqft got a chance to chat with Milstein about the surreal experience of capturing New York from the sky and his new exhibit at the Benrubi Gallery, which features his aerial shots of both New York and LA and opens tonight.

Lean out

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