Queens

Major Developments, Queens, Transportation

LaGuardia Airport renovation, NYC airports, Queens development, Governor Cuomo

Womp womp.

For those of you still flying high over yesterday’s news that LaGuardia Airport would soon be getting a major revamp, here comes some unfortunate news that might bring you back down to earth. As Crain’s reports, Governor Cuomo appears to have grossly underestimated his vision for the upgraded air hub. “According to several sources with direct knowledge of the project,” the paper says, “a new LaGuardia could take more than 10 years to build and cost close to $8 billion”—a price that’s double the Cuomo administration estimates of $4 billion, with at least another five years tacked on to the schedule.

Find out more here

Major Developments, Queens, Transportation

LaGuardia Airport renovation, NYC airports, Queens development, Governor Cuomo

After much anticipation, Governor Cuomo unveiled his plan yesterday to overhaul LaGuardia Airport, which he called “un-New York” in its current state. The $4 billion project includes consolidating the four terminals into one hub and moving the entire facility south the length of two football fields, according to Crain’s. Additionally, Cuomo’s controversial AirTrain, which will connect travelers to the 7 line in Willet’s Point, will be put into effect, as will a 24-hour ferry service that will operate out of the landmarked Art Deco Marine Air Terminal. The development will be handled by LaGuardia Gateway Partners, a new public-private partnership formed by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, who will oversee the construction, financing, and operation of the new terminal under a 35-year lease.

Lots more details and renderings this way

Architecture, Queens, Transportation

JFK TWA Terminal, Eero Saarinen, NYC landmarks, neofuturistic architecture

For the last 14 years, JFK’s most beloved structure has mostly languished vacant, reopened intermittently for public tours or to serve as the backdrop of some Jet Age fashion shoot. While there has been plenty of talk surrounding the TWA Flight Center’s transformation into a hotel, details have remained sparse until now. As Curbed has it, the city has finally revealed that MCR Development will be taking the reigns alongside JetBlue and the NYNJ Port Authority, bringing the iconic terminal back to life as a 505-room LEED-certified hotel with restaurants, 40,000 square feet of meeting space and a 10,000-square-foot observation deck. The project will aptly be called “The TWA Flight Center Hotel.”

FInd out more here

Featured Story

City Living, Features, Queens, Transportation

streets of Queens

It’s easy to tell if you’re dealing with a Queens address–there’s the hyphenated street number and the variety of numbered thoroughfare names (Street, Place, Road, Avenue, Lane, Terrace). The really hard part, however, is actually getting to that address in Queens, especially if you’re a resident from another borough to whom it feels like trying to maneuver your way in another country where you don’t know the language. But instead of continuing to find ourselves lost, we decided to get to the bottom of this complicated system.

Prior to the consolidation of New York City in 1898, what is now known as the borough of Queens was only a hodgepodge of unconnected towns, each of which had its own road system and addresses. Once the towns were combined into one borough, having multiple road systems was becoming a hindrance to fast-growing Queens. So by 1911, the borough hired engineer Charles U. Powell to replace the old systems with a carefully planned grid system.

The rest of the story is right this way

Cool Listings, Interiors, Queens

221 Arleigh Road, Douglaston, colonial

Way out in Douglaston, Queens, you’ll find some of the most impressive freestanding houses of New York City. The quiet waterfront neighborhood is known for its historic and sprawling Colonial homes set on large, green lots. Earlier this year, this beauty–which we thought looked like something straight out of “The Great Gatsby”—hit the market for $2.7 million. Now, the house at 221 Arleigh Road is on the market for $2.75 million. The impressive interior and lawn is coupled with a chalet-like interior. It all makes for a pretty one-of-a-kind NYC property.

Check it out

Astoria, Transportation

The MTA May Revive the W Train Line

By Shiloh Frederick, Wed, July 15, 2015

subway, W train, mta service changes, second avenue subway, q train

Rumor has it that the W train may be returning from the dead.

According to AM NY, the MTA is in talks with both public officials and rider advocates to bring the train back to service once the Q train is diverged to the Upper East Side to the new Second Avenue line in December 2016. Restoring the old line would prevent disrupting subway service in Astoria, an area with thousands of daily strap-hangers and only a few subways to choose from. The MTA hasn’t made any official announcements on the matter thus far, but with the opening of the Second Avenue Subway line rapidly approaching, they are said to be seriously mulling it over.

More on the rumor here

Featured Story

Features, Interiors, My SQFT House Tours, People, ridgewood

ridgewood real estate, Quooklyn real estate, inside ridgewood apartments, hipster apartments, designers in their apartments, designers in their home, quooklyn hispters, ridgewood hipsters, liz reeves, Hardin Mar

Our ongoing series “My sqft” checks out the homes of 6sqft’s friends, family and fellow New Yorkers across all the boroughs. Our latest interior adventure brings us to Ridgewood, Queens. Want your home to be featured here? Get in touch

Few neighborhoods have gotten as much buzz in the past year as Ridgewood. Considered the next frontier for cool kids getting priced out of hip areas like Williamsburg and Bushwick, Ridgewood sits at the top of NYC’s list of ones to watch. But even with all the hoopla, how many of you actually know someone who lives off this stretch of the L?

In our latest installment of My sqft, we meet Sean and Liz, a couple of Greenpoint expats who’ve made their way into a beautiful, historic brick construction along a peaceful block in the heart of this up-and-comer. Living large in a very bright and airy 800-square-foot railroad apartment, these two really don’t face the same space challenges that plague the rest of us New Yorkers, and as such they’ve found the freedom to infuse their space with lots of personality (toy bunnies, illustrations of “nerd weapons” and quirky art from across the globe) and all the furniture they’ve collected over the last decade (lots of covetable mid-century modern pieces and antiques). Jump ahead to meet this perky pair and see how they’ve created that perfect old-meets-new-meets-endearing balance that we all strive for but pretty much have no clue how to make happen in our own homes.

Go inside their adorable home here

Art, Long Island City, Policy

5POINTZ, 5POINTZ mecca, 5POINTZ long island city

Photo via Garrett Ziegler/Flickr

It’s been 19 months since the 5Pointz graffiti mecca was secretly whitewashed overnight by the developers who have since razed the site to make way for the two residential towers that will replace it. Then, to pour salt in the wound, this past November G&M Realty announced that they planned to use the iconic 5Pointz name for their new project, infuriating the artists whose work adorned the building and leading them to launch a petition to stop the title.

Now, the plot has thickened. Nine graffiti artists filed a lawsuit on Friday “seeking unspecified damages from the owner who whitewashed away their artwork,” reports the Daily News. The plaintiffs claim they’re owed financial compensation as they were not given the opportunity to retrieve their work, much of which could have ended up in museums or the artists’ personal collections. The lost collection amounts to more than 350 graffiti pieces.

More details here

Cool Listings, Quirky Homes, Rego Park

63-36 99th Street, Millennium 99, Rego Park real estate

Experts recently said that NYC apartments are a better investment than gold. But how does the formula work out when the apartment is dripping in gold?

A Queens-based jewelry designer spent $150,000 to outfit her Rego Park condo with glittering and gilded touches like door handles made of Swarovski crystals, walls and ceilings painted with crystal dust, 24k white gold leaf mosaics on the kitchen backsplash and columns and gold-plated bathroom fixtures. And she appropriately named her home the Jewelry Box. DNAinfo reports that the apartment, located at the Millennium 99 luxury condo at 63-36 99th Street, has hit the market for $1,288,886, which might be the highest asking price to date in the neighborhood.

Check out the opulent pad here

Architecture, condos, Long Island City, New Developments

Hunter's Point, LIC construction, LIC developments, Murray Park, Centrury Development, Queens condos

While Manhattan buyers typically pay a great premium for a park-front address, a single subway stop away in Long Island City, a new condominium aptly named [email protected] Murray Park North will begin sales with homes starting around $400,000. Developed by George Xu and Century Development Group, the six-story, 39-unit building will house a mix of studio, one- and two-bedroom apartments designed by Queens’ own Raymond Chan Architects.

[email protected] Murray Park North is located at 11-35 45th Avenue along the northern frontage of the 2.5 acre Murray Park/Murray Playground. Similar in size to downtown’s Gramercy Park, the community jewel is LIC’s largest green space not situated along the East River. The park is also across from the neighborhood’s sole historic district and is positioned centrally between the area’s two booming high-rise nodes–the master-planned Hunter’s Point waterfront community and the Court Square-Queens Plaza business district.

More on the project ahead

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