Long Island City

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Architecture, Carter Uncut, Features, Long Island City, Queens, Urban Design

Carter Uncut brings New York City’s latest development news under the critical eye of resident architecture critic Carter B. Horsley. Here, Carter brings us his sixth installment of “Skyline Wars,” a series that examines the explosive and unprecedented supertall phenomenon that is transforming the city’s silhouette. In this post Carter looks at the new towers defining the Queens skyline.

For a long time, the glass tower erected by Citibank was the lone skyscraper of note in Queens. Known initially as Citicorp at Court Square, it was built in 1989 and designed by Raul de Armas of SOM as a blue-green metal-panel-and-glass office tower with just a few setbacks at its 633-foot-high top—an extremely clean-cut, modern obelisk of fine proportions.

In a 1988 article in The New York Times, Anthony DePalma wrote that the tower “dominates the Queens skyline like a sequoia in the desert” and Paul Goldberger, then the newspaper’s architecture critic, wrote the tower was “rapidly becoming one of the most conspicuous structures in the entire city.” He added, “It is a very unlikely thing, this building—no other skyscraper in New York is remotely like the Citicorp tower, not so much for its design as for the fact that it stands free, alone in this landscape of gas stations, warehouses and row houses,”

The bank tower transformed “the landscape of New York” and “no longer does Manhattan virtually by itself control the skyline,” Mr. Goldberger continued. “Skyscrapers built at random all over New York would be devastating, but an occasional exclamation point, well designed and carefully placed, will do the skyline no grievous harm,” he concluded. This is a very important but also very controversial point as currently evidenced in Manhattan where traditional precincts are being pin-pricked to exhaustion and confusion by supertalls.

more on the queens skyline

Hotels, Long Island City, New Developments

DREAM HOTEL LIC, 9-03 44th Road (3)

Near Long Island City‘s East River waterfront, work has begun on an eleven-story, 199-room DREAM Hotel conceived through a joint venture between Millhouse Peck Properties, Barone Management and MATT Development. The hotel will rise from a full-block, commercially-zoned lot between 44th Road, 44th Avenue, and 9th and 10th streets, which was previously home to Manhattan Cabinetry’s factory building (the company has since relocated those operations to Woodside).

Stephen B. Jacobs Group has been tapped as the architect and the studio has designed a Standard Hotel-esque tower where the room floors are pitched above various restaurants, bars and outdoor terraces. New nighttime renderings show windows framed by LED lighting. A previous image suggested the developers were looking to salvage a corner facade of the factory-building, but the facade is no longer depicted in the new set of renderings and the entire factory structure has been cleared from the site.

even more details here

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, Long Island City, New Developments, Queens, real estate trends

Watch out Hudson Yards, Midtown is moving east to Queens. The glassy ghetto formerly known as Long Island City is sprouting a small city worth of skyscrapers, ushering in thousands of new residents, hundreds of hotel rooms, and a few hundred thousand square feet of office space. To help us visualize the neighborhood’s upcoming transformation, the dynamos at Rockrose Development commissioned visualization experts Zum-3d to produce this exceptionally accurate depiction of the changes afoot. Inspired by the rendering, 6sqft has put together a rundown of the nearly 30 under-construction and proposed projects for the ‘hood.

See the full roster ahead

Cool Listings, Historic Homes, Long Island City

We may most often think of the Hunters Point section of Long Island City as the home of a decade-plus building boom that has resulted in a neighborhood of glassy luxury condo and rental towers with amenities galore. But the sleek, vertical community also has an historic district and streets lined with 19th-century row houses.

Built in 1887 as one of six brick houses, the two-story-plus-basement row house at 21-24 45th Avenue is among the neighborhood’s historic finds, and it’s currently for sale asking $1.2 million. The listing notes that the building is being delivered as-is with SRO tenants. It’s currently set up as a five-unit rental property with a vacant sixth (studio) unit.

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Architecture, condos, Cool Listings, Long Island City, New Developments

The Jackson, 11-51 47th Avenue, Fogarty Finger, Long Island City

Situated squarely between Long Island City‘s waterfront towers and its burgeoning Court Square and Queens Plaza business districts, an upcoming industrially-inspired condominium named the Jackson is beginning construction work. On Friday, the New York Times unveiled pricing information for the 70,000-square-foot project, and a polished set of renderings has been published on the developer’s website. The 11-story, 54-unit project is being shepherded by a joint-venture among Charney Construction & Development, Ascent Development, and Tavros Capital.

The development site, located around the corner from MoMA PS1, was formerly occupied by a parking lot and a nondescript two-story building. Fogarty Finger, the building’s architects, have designed several other low- to mid-scale residential projects in LIC that complement the fleetingly-gritty neighborhood’s aesthetic. Here they accomplish that by using raw material such as steel, concrete, and wood, as well as oversized windows that feel like an old industrial loft building.

This way for details, renderings, and pricing

Architecture, Long Island City, New Developments

Court Square City View Tower, 23-15 44th Drive, Long Island City development, United Construction & Development Group, tallest building in Queens, NYC tallest towers, Goldstein Hill & West Architects

Back in August, 6sqft revealed renderings of the upcoming Long Island City skyscraper dubbed Queens Plaza Park, which is slated to rise 915 feet. At the time, this made it the tallest building planned outside of Manhattan, but a lot can change in six months. First off, Brooklyn will take the outer borough title, as a 1,066-foot tower is planned for 340 Flatbush Avenue Extension in Downtown Brooklyn. And now, Queens Plaza Park will also lose its Queens-based superlative, as The Real Deal reports that there’s a new tallest building in town.

Flushing-based developer Chris Jiashu Xu of United Construction & Development Group filed plans for a 79-story residential tower in Long Island City that will rise a whopping 964 feet. It’s located just north of One Court Square (the borough’s current title-holder at 658 feet) at 23-15 44th Drive and is titled Court Square City View Tower. The building is designed by Goldstein, Hill & West Architects (the same firm responsible for former tallest frontrunner 42-12 28th Street) and appears to be a fairly standard glassy volume. Its 759,000 square feet of residential space will yield 774 apartments, and there will also be 200,000 square feet of retail on the ground floor.

More details and views ahead

Architecture, Art, Long Island City, Urban Design

Escobedo Soliz, MoMA, MoMA PS1, Young Architects Program, YAP, Warm-up, Weaving the courtyard, Long Island City, Queens, Art, Architecture Prize, Outdoor installation, MoMA PS1 Warm-Up

MoMA has announced that the Mexico City-based architecture firm Escobedo Solíz Studio was selected as the winner of the 2016 Young Architects Program (YAP). Chosen from five finalists, the winning project,”Weaving the Courtyard,” will create a “temporary urban landscape” for the 2016 Warm Up summer music series in MoMA PS1’s outdoor courtyard in Long Island City, beginning in early June.

The site-specific architectural intervention will use the courtyard’s concrete walls to generate both sky and landscape, with embankments in which platforms of soil and water suggest the appearance of a unique topography. The architects describe their project as “neither an object nor a sculpture standing in the courtyard, but a series of simple, powerful actions that generate new and different atmospheres.”

Find out more

Architecture, Long Island City, New Developments, Rentals

Raymond Chan Architect, The Lions Group, Jackson East, Jackson West, One Queens Plaza, LIC, Queens Plaza

Another day, another Long Island City project unveiled. This new build comes in at 27-51 Jackson Avenue by way of Lions Group, who are already juggling three projects nearby: Jackson East, Jackson West, and ONE Queens Plaza.

Last week, the LIC Post reported demolition permits were filed to raze the two small structures on the site. Construction permits have yet to be filed, but details from the project’s EB-5 offering page show a 13-story, 38,500 square foot tower designed by Flushing-based Raymond Chan Architect. The project will rise directly alongside an under construction Gene Kaufman-designed Aloft Hotel at 27-45 Jackson Avenue.

More here

affordable housing, housing lotteries, Long Island City

21-03 46th Avenue, Long Island City, NYC affordable housing

The affordable housing lottery for 21-03 46th Avenue in Long Island City officially opens today, and the brand new one-bedroom luxury units will be a mere $918, according to the NYC HPD. Apartments have private terraces, ten-foot ceilings, Brazilian cherry floors, chef’s kitchens with stainless steel appliances, and in-unit washers/dryers. Plus, the address is right across from MoMA PS1 and just a block away from the E, M, 7 and G subways. The catch? The building only has eight units and only two of these are deemed affordable.

Feeling lucky? Find out if you qualify.

affordable housing, Architecture, Construction Update, Long Island City, New Developments, Rentals

Watermark Court Square, Twinning Properties, LIC Development, LEED, NAS International, Principal Investors, Bank Santander, Court Square

Yesterday, 6sqft discussed how Long Island City‘s Purves Street is a hotbed of construction activity with no less than four residential towers underway along the 500-foot, one-block stretch. On a site situated between Thomson Avenue (where the pioneer condo Arris Lofts rises) and Court Square, Twining Properties has begun excavation work for a 27-story, 168-unit rental tower at 44-14 Purves Street.

According to the developer’s project page, the rental tower will be known as Watermark Court Square and is to offer “efficient apartment layouts designed for mobile professionals.” The handsome albeit unremarkable design by Handel Architects is faced with grey brick and large windows. According to Department of Buildings filings, the ground-up, 302-foot-tall tower will rise along 44th Drive, while a two-story existing building will be rehabilitated along Purves.

More details and renderings

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