Neighborhoods

Gowanus, Policy

Gowanus Canal

Photo by Danny Navarro / Flickr cc

Mayor Bill de Blasio’s ambitious plan for the rezoning of Brooklyn’s formerly industrial Gowanus neighborhood was finally approved by the city’s Land Use Committee on Wednesday, after a decade of debate and drama. As Gothamist reports, the rezoning plan, the current administration’s largest, was given the green light after Council Members Brad Lander and Stephen Levin, the borough’s Community Board 6, and members of the Gowanus Neighborhood Coalition for Justice reached a deal with City Hall that includes more investment in public housing and sewer infrastructure.

Find out more about what’s ahead for Gowanus

affordable housing, Brooklyn, housing lotteries, Sunset Park

Rendering courtesy of the NYC Department of Housing Preservation and Development

If you have ever dreamed of living in one of New York City’s libraries like the live-in branch superintendents of the last century, here’s a chance to reside above one. A housing lottery opened this week for 49 affordable apartments in Sunset Park, Brooklyn. Located at 372 51st Street, the newly constructed mixed-use building includes a newly expanded Brooklyn Public Library branch. New Yorkers earning 40, 50, 60, and 80 percent of the area median income can apply for the units, ranging from $524/month studios to $2,096/month three-bedrooms.

How to apply

Cool Listings, Forest Hills, Queens

Photo Credit: Donna Schwab for Terrace Sotheby’s International Realty

A lovely brick Tudor surrounded on all sides by lush landscaping is available in Queens. Asking $1,728,000, the home is located at 69-46 Fleet Street in Forest Hills, a mostly residential neighborhood that feels suburban, but also is only 15 minutes to Midtown thanks to the nearby Long Island Rail Road and subway. The four-bedroom residence boasts a charming slate walkway, tucked-away side patio, and a sunken back garden.

See inside

Flushing, History

Photo: NYC Parks/ Malcolm Pinckney

Hundreds of New Yorkers, mostly African and Native American residents, who were buried in Flushing at least 150 years ago were finally honored with a memorial this week. The city’s Parks Department and Queens officials on Tuesday cut the ribbon on a new commemorative plaza at the Olde Towne of Flushing Burial Ground. The site, located north of 46th Avenue between 164th and 165th Streets, was used as a public burial ground starting as early as 1840, with over 1,000 individuals buried there until 1898. A new memorial wall includes the name of the sacred site, a brief history, and 318 recorded names of those buried there, and the new plaza has a butterfly garden and surrounding benches.

Get the details

Manhattan, Policy

Via Creative Commons

In March, 6sqft reported that only 10 percent of Manhattan’s office employees had returned to the workplace full-time. Since then, a recent survey shows, only 28 percent are back in the office on an average weekday. According to a survey of major employers between October 19 and October 29 by The Partnership for New York City, only 8 percent of employees are in the office five days a week and 54 percent are only working remotely. A third of employers surveyed said their need for office space will go down over the next five years, and 13 percent expect a reduction of jobs physically located in NYC, especially in the financial services industry.

-More on who’s not heading back to the office->

Brooklyn Heights, Cool Listings

Photos: Allyson Lubow Photography for The Corcoran Group

At this brownstone in Brooklyn Heights, a garden-level office could transform into a professional work-from-home space. Constructed in 1848, the four-story home at 159 Clinton Street contains five bedrooms, a private backyard, and a former doctor’s office. With a separate entrance and flexible floorplan, the garden level could easily become the home office of your remote work dreams. The home is on the market for $5,500,000.

See inside

Brooklyn, Design, Products

A Brooklyn edition of Monopoly is now available

By Devin Gannon, Tue, November 9, 2021

Photo courtesy of Top Trumps USA

A new edition of the classic board game Monopoly replaces the famous Atlantic City squares with beloved landmarks of Brooklyn. Making its debut Tuesday, Monopoly Brooklyn Edition features historic landmarks, like the Brooklyn Bridge and Soldiers Sailors Memorial Arch, entertainment spots, including Coney Island and Barclays Center, cultural institutions, like Weeksville Heritage Center and the Brooklyn Botanic Garden, and many more destinations.

Get the details

affordable housing, Harlem, housing lotteries

Image courtesy of NYC Department of Housing Preservation & Development

At 27 stories and 340 feet high, the new Victoria Towers redevelopment at 230 West 126th Street in central Harlem–the site of the former Victoria Theater–has the distinction of being the neighborhood’s tallest building. Leasing opened in July, and now 102 of its units are available for those earning 50, 60 or 130 percent of the area median income and range from studios at $755 /month to $3043/month two-bedrooms (market-rate studios start at $2,238/month). Designed by Aufgang Architects, the mixed-use building complex is also home to a Renaissance Marriott hotel and a cultural arts center.

Find out how to apply

Architecture, Landmarks Preservation Commission, Murray Hill

Photo: George Comfort & Sons via Landmarks Preservation Commission

One of Manhattan’s grandest lobbies is officially a New York City landmark. The Landmarks Preservation Commission voted to designate the ornate, T-shaped first-floor lobby of 200 Madison Avenue on Tuesday. Designed by Warren & Wetmore in 1925–the firm behind Grand Central Terminal–the Murray Hill lobby features a 200-foot-long through-block arcade that boasts a beautiful vaulted ceiling, polished marble walls, and other stunning elements reflective of the era.

Get the details

Cool Listings, Upper East Side

All photos by Travis Mark for Sotheby’s International Realty

A stylish classic six located a block from Central Park and Museum Mile is now available. Asking $7,250,000, this two-bedroom, two-bath at 14 East 75th Street was impeccably designed by Emily Summers, an award-winning interior designer. In addition to its coveted Upper East Side location, the home offers unique architectural elements, including 16-foot ceilings, a wood-burning fireplace with an antique mantle, and ten fully restored 17th-century Swiss stained-glass panels.

Take the tour

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