Upper East Side

real estate trends, Upper East Side

All Barneys New York stores to close by end of the month

By Devin Gannon, Fri, February 14, 2020

Photo by Jim.henderson on Wikimedia

It’s the end of an era. Once an icon in the luxury fashion world, Barneys New York is officially closing its doors this month. All stores will shutter on Feb. 23, the New York Post reported on Thursday, with 719 employees losing their jobs at the retailer’s flagship location at 660 Madison Avenue, its store in Chelsea at 101 Seventh Avenue, an outlet in Central Valley, and its corporate offices at 575 Fifth Avenue. Barneys California stores in Beverly Hills and San Francisco will also close Feb. 23.

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Design, Upper East Side

Street view of 3 East 89th Street; Map data © 2020 Google

The plan to restore a historic Upper East Side townhouse and transform it into a new art gallery was partially approved by the Landmarks Preservation Commission Tuesday. The neo-Renaissance townhouse at 3 East 89th Street in the expanded Carnegie Hill Historic District, as well as two connecting buildings, was formerly home to the National Academy Museum. Salon 94 owner Jeanne Greenberg Rohatyn purchased the property last summer with the intention of consolidating her three art galleries at the property. Led by Rafael Viñoly Architects, the revamp includes a facade rehabilitation, new central gallery space, and a restoration of the original porte-cochere from 1915. While there was overwhelming support for the new gallery space, the LPC rejected the project’s proposed sixth-floor rooftop addition, with most commissioners having issues with its bulk and visibility.

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Cool Listings, Upper East Side

333 east 66th street, cool listings, upper east side

Photo credit: Al Siedman of VHT, courtesy of The Corcoran Group

It’s easy to overcomplicate things when it comes to real estate, but this Upper East Side co-op at 333 East 66th Street keeps things simple. It’s basically an alcove studio, but custom-designed built-in storage makes great use of every inch of space. A recent designer renovation makes it easy on the eyes, and a high floor means light and city views.

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Architecture, Museums, Upper East Side

9 East 71st Street, Jeffrey Epstein, Frick Collection, Upper East Side

Image via Google Maps

Preservationists who have long fought against the Frick Collection’s planned expansion are proposing a rather unique solution: the museum could take over Jeffrey Epstein’s “cursed mansion” across the street instead. “The fact that it’s so convenient to the museum means that the Frick could potentially lay Jeffrey Epstein’s name to rest by purchasing it and changing the function,” architect Theodore Grunewald, who runs preservationist group Save The Frick, told the Daily News. “It could essentially be cleansing the house.”

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Cool Listings, Upper East Side

12 East 69th Street, townhouses, upper east side

Listing images courtesy of Brown Harris Stevens

The palatial Upper East Side home that almost became the most expensive townhouse ever sold in New York City two years ago is back on the market. The seven-bedroom mansion was first listed in 2013 for a whopping $114 million and then for $98 million in 2014. It was most recently available in 2018 for $88 million and just received another price cut to (a still very formidable) $79 million. The 40-foot wide property at 12 East 69th Street sprawls over 20,000 square feet on six levels and comes with a movie theatre, saltwater pool, double-height library, and a 2,650 square-foot roof terrace overlooking Central Park.

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Cool Listings, Upper East Side

Listing images courtesy of Brown Harris Stevens

Located on the corner of Third Avenue, this five-story townhouse at 182 East 94th Street brings downtown loft living to the Upper East Side. With over 5,800 square feet of interior space, the residence comes with a roof terrace, separate studio apartment on the ground floor, private parking, and nearly 4,500 square feet of unused development rights. The sprawling pad was constructed in 2012 and has yet to change ownership. The property listed last week for $9.975 million and is also available on the rental market for $30,000/month.

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Cool Listings, Upper East Side

3 East 78th Street, upper east side, cool listings, mansions,condos

Photo credit: Donna Dotan, courtesy of Compass.

This rare condo conversion in a Gilded Age mansion on the Upper East Side sits just across from Central Park and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Designed by C.P.H. Gilbert, 3 East 78th Street was built in 1899 as a six-story, 35-foot-wide private residence and converted to condominiums in 1964, keeping its ornate French Gothic limestone looks intact. The lush apartment within, asking $3,995,000, is a grande dame of a duplex spanning the mansion’s fourth and fifth floors, with an elevator to get you there.

Tour this elegant Upper East Side home

real estate trends, Upper East Side

Photo by Jim.henderson on Wikimedia

Barneys New York was officially sold for roughly $270 million on Friday after filing for bankruptcy just three months prior. The new owners of the luxury retailer, Authentic Brands Group and B. Riley Financial Inc., will license the Barneys name to other companies and likely close most of its locations across the country. But the store’s beloved flagship location at 660 Madison Avenue will stay open for at least the next year, according to the Real Deal.

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Cool Listings, Upper East Side

42 East 73 Street, Upper East Side, Cool Listings, Co-ops

Listing images by Alan Barry; courtesy of Compass

Around the corner from Madison Avenue at 42 East 73rd Street, this stylish Upper East Side duplex features a romantic, Greek-inspired garden complete with ionic columns and a variety of plantings. Inside, bronze columns frame an elegant living area on the first level, while the second floor provides a flexible guest suite or home office. The two-bedroom is seeking $1.895 million.

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Cool Listings, Historic Homes, Upper East Side

32 East 74th Street, William Lescaze, Upper East Side

Listing images courtesy of Warburg Realty

In 2013, the New York Times described the William Lescaze townhouse at 32 East 74th Street—one of the first modernist residences built in NYC—as being “just at the edge of passing from worn to shabby, waiting for a new owner to bring it back to flawlessness.” After years of being on and off the market, a new owner came into the picture in 2015, when he bought the property for $14.5 million and transformed it into a three-unit investment property. Lescaze designed the house for Raymond C. and Mildred Kramer in 1934, one year after completing a modernist home for himself at 211 East 48th Street. Both feature his characteristic use of white stucco and glass bricks. The landmarked exteriors have remained intact, but as 6sqft previously noted, the interiors have long shed any trace of Lescaze’s interior design. The transformed property was most recently on the market in 2017 with a $20 million ask and is now back for a slightly reduced $19.5 million.

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