Architecture, condos, New Developments, Nomad, Starchitecture

Architecture Work Office, Ziel Feldman, Marble Collegiate 2 (1)

Images of a mysterious high-rise project have been posted on the website of Architecture Work Office, depicting a balcony-laden 50-story residential tower that balloons in area as it rises.

The rendered skyscraper appears to align with a block-through development site near the corner of West 29th Street and Fifth Avenue that has been assembled by Ziel Feldman’s HFZ Development. That site was purchased from the Collegiate Churches of New York in 2013 and was partially occupied by the striped brick and limestone Bancroft Building dating to 1896. Despite pleas from preservationists, the building was demolished earlier this year and has gone down as one of the city’s most heart-wrenching architectural losses in recent years.

is this new tower in the works?

Architecture, condos, New Developments, Nomad

*** Update via the development team: Interior renderings from ASJNY are only conceptual and do not represent the actual project moving forward.

Here’s our first look at what the residences of a highly anticipated condo conversion at 212 Fifth Avenue could look like. In March we revealed a set of whimsical renderings for a conceptual design whipped up by the visualization artists ASJNY.

The actual plan going forward, approved by the Landmarks Preservation Commission this past April, calls for a more sensitive touch. In addition to carving out 48 homes, the 1913 neo-gothic building’s ground-level storefronts will be renovated, its parapets reconstructed, and the tower’s stately limestone, terra-cotta and brick exterior will be restored, which may entail creating some additional windows.

More details ahead

Chelsea, Cool Listings, Interiors, Nomad

107 West 25th Street, original tin ceilings, 16-foot skylight, common roof garden and deck

If you’re looking for a loft with character, you’ll want to check out this unit at 107 West 25th Street in Chelsea. It has all the original elements you look for, like refinished hardwoods, and whitewashed exposed brick, while throwing in some rare extras like original tin ceilings, exposed pipes painted red, and a 16-foot skylight. And it’s available for rent for the first time ever for $6,500 a month.

More pics inside

condos, New Developments, Nomad, Starchitecture

281 fifth avenue rafael vinoly tower, 281 fifth avenue, rafael vinoly tower

Image via New York YIMBY

Is there any architect more in demand than Rafael Viñoly these days? NY YIMBY has uncovered the first renderings of the starchitect’s latest residential project, a tower slated to pierce the sky from a Nomad site at 281 Fifth Avenue. Though notably smaller than 432 Park Avenue at just 705 feet, the skyscraper does share the 432’s stark and very geometrical shape. It will also be one of the tallest in the neighborhood once constructed.

Find out more here

Featured Story

Features, History, Madison Square, Nomad

madison square park

Recent reports show that NoMad has taken over the top spot for priciest neighborhood in the city in which to rent, with a one-bedroom unit going for an average of $4,270/month. For most real estate aficionados this isn’t shocking, as the neighborhood has been growing into one of the city’s hottest spots for the past several years, but few know of the area’s fascinating past.

Named for our fourth president, James Madison, the 6.2-acre Madison Square Park was first used as a potter’s field, then an army arsenal, then a military parade ground and finally as the New York House of Refuge children’s shelter, until it was destroyed by a fire in 1839. After the fire, the land between 23rd and 26th Streets from Fifth to Madison Avenues was established as a public park enclosed by a cast-iron fence in 1847. The redesign included pedestrian walkways, lush shrubbery, open lawns, fountains, benches and monuments and is actually similar to the park that exists today.

Find out how our beloved madison square park came to be

Nomad, Policy, real estate trends

Broadway between 26th and 27th Streets, NoMad

Broadway between 26th and 27th Streets, part of the current Madison Square North Historic District, via Wiki Commons

Over the past few years, NoMad (north of Madison Square Park) has been the subject of countless articles looking at its rise to becoming a go-to place for culture, food, business, and residential opportunities. In fact, as we reported last June, since 2009 the neighborhood has seen price-per-square-foot averages rise by 40 percent. But not everyone looks at this neighborhood as the next frontier. Local residents and preservationists see the area as a relic of the late 19th century, when it was home to the city’s most opulent hotels and mansions and brownstones occupied by New York’s elite, as well as of the Roaring Twenties, when the community boomed as a commercial hub. For these cultural reasons and for NoMad’s wealth of industrial and gilded architecture, a proposal will be heard tonight in front of the landmarks committee of Community Board No. 5 to extend the Madison Square North Historic District.

NoMad property owners and developers don’t agree with the proposal, citing that the area’s building stock has been significantly altered over the years. As the Wall Street Journal reports, “The face-off is significant because it is centered in an area that has seen hundreds of millions of dollars of private investment, with new hotels and apartment buildings breaking ground, and new stores and restaurants opening almost weekly. In the eyes of real-estate executives, it would freeze growth in a rare section of Midtown Manhattan still ripe for development.”

More details

Architecture, condos, Construction Update, New Developments, Nomad

212 Fifth Avenue, BLT, Madison Equities, Extell, BLT, NoMad, Madison Square, Madison Square Park, Flatiron, Eataly, AJSNY,Helpern Architects, Manhattan condos

With the debut of their newly-sharpened website, the visual-realization whizzes at AJSNY are seeking to steal some Apple Watch buzz with this stunningly whimsical rooftop addition atop the now-under-conversion 212 Fifth Avenue in Nomad.

The conceptual vision, designed by the rendering team themselves, shows a bronze-clad, multi-story addition wrapped with sinuous ribbons framing an enormous south-facing clock. Below the steampunk-esque penthouse, AJSNY depicts a standard condo-conversion affair of open layouts and double-height spaces for the 1913 neo-medieval tower. The team’s images also give us an idea of what the official owners–Madison Equities, Thor Equities, and Building and Land Technology–have in mind for this quintessential Manhattan address. The scheme is not official or approved, but it certainly is creative.

More details on the proposed design ahead

Nomad, real estate trends

Is 212 Fifth Avenue the Ultimate Manhattan Address?

By Dana Schulz, Wed, February 25, 2015

212 fifth avenue

That’s what developers of a new condominium at 212 Fifth Avenue are hoping. The prestige of Fifth Avenue is world-famous (it also adds a 5- to 10-percent premium to the price of an apartment), and as anyone who was around back in the days of analog phone exchanges knows, 212 is synonymous with Manhattan. Reporting on the “New York-iest address,” the Daily News mentions how even “Seinfeld”‘s Elaine steals her dead neighbor’s 212 phone number after she gets changed to a 646 area code. “The bearer of a 212 phone number looks like a longtime New Yorker. It’s the ultimate luxury accessory,” the paper says.

Is all the fuss justified?

Featured Story

Features, holidays, Interviews, New Yorker Spotlight, Nomad, People

sarah forbes museum of sex

If you’ve walked along lower Fifth Avenue, then the Museum of Sex most certainly has caught your eye; maybe you’ve even visited it and seen a few of the exhibits curated by Sarah Forbes.

Sarah is the museum’s sole curator, which means it’s her job to conceive and oversee exhibitions on a myriad of topics related to sex. Her goal is the same as the museum’s goal: to expand visitors’ horizons and to dispel myths and misconceptions that are out there. Beyond educating the public through its oftentimes provocative exhibits, the Museum of Sex is dedicated to sharing information and artwork through its permanent collection of over 15,000 artifacts as well as its research library and media archive.

With Valentine’s Day approaching, we couldn’t think of a better time to chat with Sarah to find out more about New York’s relationship with sex, how the museum helps the city understand it differently, and why it’s the perfect spot to celebrate the holiday.

Read on for our interview with Sarah

Architecture, Construction Update, New Developments, Nomad

Commune hotel, Nomad, Gwathmey Siegel Kaufman Architects, Mancini Duffy, rooftop bars, NYC hotels

After lying fallow for years, the site of the city’s first Commune Hotel at 11 East 31st Street is abuzz with construction activity and has risen to street level. Developed by Simon Development Group, Cube Capital, and Eagle Point Hotel, the 250-room, 32-story hotel situated between Fifth and Madison Avenues will be among a dozen new residential and hotel developments slated to transform the once-sleepy NoMad neighborhood.

With Gwathmey Siegel Kaufman Architects serving as the design architects and Mancini-Duffy Architecture as the architects of record, the slender 335-foot tower will feature a 125-seat restaurant, lounge, and a rooftop bar providing sweeping skyline vistas and front-row views of the Empire State Building.

More on the hotel and construction progress ahead


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