Harlem

Harlem

Statue of Dr. J. Marion Sims in Central Park. Image: Wikimedia Commons.

As protest and debate sweep the nation over the toppling of statues, centered around well-known Confederate names like Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson, here in New York City a lesser-known monument to medicine is in the spotlight for its offensive nature. The New York Times reports that Manhattan Community Board 11 is calling upon the city to remove an East Harlem statue of a white, southern doctor, Dr. James Marion Sims. Regarded as the father of modern gynecology, Sims achieved his success by performing experiments on slaves without consent and without anesthesia.

Definitely no hero here

affordable housing, Green Design, Harlem, New Developments

Sendero Verde, Handel Architects, L+M Development, East Harlem affordable housing, passive house NYC

Renderings via Handel Architects

Despite Mayor de Blasio’s success meeting his affordable housing goals, East Harlem has fallen behind. As 6sqft recently reported, out of the 21,963 new units added in 2016,  just 249 were built in East Harlem, prompting the city to expedite the construction of 2,400 affordable units there over the next few years. A large chunk of this will come from Sendero Verde, a massive, mixed-use development that will bring 655 affordable rentals to the block bound by East 111th and 112th Streets and Park and Madison Avenues. Back in February, Jonathan Rose Companies and L+M Development Partners released a rendering from Handel Architects of the 751,000-square-foot project, but now CityRealty has uncovered an entire batch of drawings from the firm that detail how it will be the country’s largest passive house project and weave together the residences, a school, supermarket, and four community gardens, all surrounding a multi-layered courtyard.

More looks and details ahead

affordable housing, Harlem, housing lotteries

Image via Whole Foods’ Facebook

New Yorkers earning 50 percent of the area median income can apply for two affordable one-bedroom apartments for $1,015 per month at 40 West 126th Street. The Central Harlem multi-family building was renovated in 2013 and is just steps away from the 2 and 3 train lines, an abundance of restaurants and bars like the Red Rooster and Sylvia’s, the Studio Museum in Harlem, both the Apollo Theater and National Black Theatre, and the city’s latest Whole Foods that’s set to open next week.

Find out if you qualify

affordable housing, Harlem, housing lotteries

The HAP Ten building at 2211 Third Avenue and 121st Street in East Harlem was created by HAP Investment Developers and designed by Karl Fischer Architects, who employed a gray brick facade with metal panels and several rows of glass balconies. Starting tomorrow, New Yorkers earning 60 percent of the area median income can apply for 22 affordable apartments in the 108-unit building, ranging from $913/month studios to $1,183/month two-bedrooms. Amenities include a concierge, fitness center, rooftop terrace, parking, outdoor entertainment space, and bike room.

Find out if you qualify

Harlem, Major Developments

Columbia School of Business, Manhattanville Campus, Diller Scofidio +Renfro, Columbia University

More than ten years after it was first proposed, the expansion of Columbia University into Manhattanville is finally coming together, with its first building opening on Harlem’s west side. While some residents worried the expansion would infringe on the Harlem community, the president of the university, Lee Bollinger, said the ongoing construction will result in roughly $6.3 billion in local investment. As the Daily News reported, the school paid $578 million to minority-, women-, and locally owned firms for construction work in the last five years. The project also created more than 1,500 construction jobs each year.

Find out more

Celebrities, Cool Listings, Harlem

If anyone can convince a buyer to part with $4.6 million for a four-story townhouse in an historic and happening part of Harlem, it’s a magician. This four-story 18th century townhouse at 278 West 113th Street, on the market for the first time since 1991, has certainly got one in the form of master escape artist Harry Houdini, illusionist, magician and one of the buzziest celebrities of the early 20th century. Houdini–born Erich Weiss, son of a rabbi from Budapest–and his wife, Bess, lived at the Harlem home for 22 years until his death in 1926 (h/t Curbed).

This house is no illusion

Harlem, Policy, real estate trends

As real estate developers and brokers continue rebranding neighborhoods with new nicknames, some community members fear this gentrifies and strips the history away from their nabes. Like NoLo (SoHo + Nolita + Lower East Side) and DoBro (Downtown Brooklyn) before it, SoHa, the new branding moniker for South Harlem, has been met with resistance from residents. According to Crain’s, newly elected state Senator Brian Benjamin, a native of Harlem, talked with so many residents that opposed the term SoHa, he has introduced a bill banning people, specifically brokers, from using the nickname as a marketing tool.

Find out more

Cool Listings, Harlem

Two-bedroom Harlem co-op asks a very reasonable $389K

By Michelle Cohen, Thu, June 1, 2017

214 Bradhurst Avenue, cool listings, harlem, co-ops

This two-bedroom co-op at 214 Bradhurst Avenue in (pretty far) north central Harlem is sunny and sweet. It’s a fourth-floor walkup, but it’s competitively priced at $389,000, which might just make that trip worth it. The home overlooks Jackie Robinson Park, and it’s about five blocks to the nearest subway, which is the 3.

Find out more and take a tour

affordable housing, Harlem, housing lotteries

Photo of Sugar Hill row houses via Wikipedia

Located in the historic Sugar Hill district in Hamilton Heights, 16 newly renovated affordable units are available to rent at 369 Edgecombe Avenue and 801 St. Nicholas Avenue. The neighborhood is chock full of Queen Anne- and Romanesque Revival-style homes, and it has easy access to Jackie Robinson park, which includes a recreation center, baseball fields, and a swimming pool. The buildings featured in the city’s housing lottery are open to New Yorkers earning 50 and 60 percent of the area median income, with units ranging from $747/month one-bedrooms to $1,196/month three-bedrooms.

Find out if you qualify

affordable housing, Harlem, housing lotteries

1918 First Avenue, Metropolitan Hospital Center, Dattner Architects, Draper Hall Apartments, SKA Marin, East Harlem affordable housing

Draper Hall, rendering via Dattner Architects

In March of 2015, East Harlem’s Metropolitan Hospital Center filed plans to horizontally expand and add a new facade to their former nurses’ dormitory known as Draper Hall. Located at 1918 First Avenue, the 14-story building had been vacant since Hurricane Sandy, and after Dattner Architects’ renovation, it’s been reborn as affordable senior housing, containing 203 subsidized units. Those age 62 and older who earn between $0 and $38,200 annually are now eligible to apply for 51 of these one-bedroom residences, for which they will pay 30 percent of their income.

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