Harlem

Cool Listings, Harlem

Asking just $350K, this Harlem condo is a compact steal

By Dana Schulz, Fri, February 26, 2021

Photos courtesy of The Corcoran Group

The $350,000 asking price for this duplex condo in Harlem is one of the lowest we’ve seen in a while, especially considering it’s not tiny at 780 square feet. Located at 161 West 133rd Street, the home has a decent amount of living/dining space on the upper level, while the lower level makes a perfect bedroom suite with a half bath (there’s a full bathroom upstairs) and a laundry closet.

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Celebrities, Harlem

Remembering Cicely Tyson’s Harlem roots

By Dana Schulz, Fri, January 29, 2021

Cicely Tyson in 1973. Photo (cropped) from the Dutch National Archives via Wikimedia Commons

Groundbreaking actress Cicely Tyson passed away yesterday at the age of 96. As the New York Times writes in a beautiful obituary, her “vivid portrayals of strong African-American women shattered racial stereotypes in the dramatic arts of the 1970s, propelling her to stardom and fame as an exemplar for civil rights.” While we all look back at Ms. Tyson’s incredible life and legacy, we can also look back to her early life, which began in East Harlem. Raised in a fifth-floor railroad flat at 178 East 101st Street, Ms. Tyson helped found the Dance Theatre of Harlem and attended the Abyssinian Baptist Church on West 138th Street for the past 20 years.

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Featured Story

City Living, Features, Harlem, History

New York City’s tributes to Martin Luther King Jr.

By Devin Gannon, Fri, January 15, 2021

Stanziola, P. (1964) Mayor Wagner greets Dr. & Mrs. Martin Luther King, Jr. at City Hall / World-Telegram & Sun photo by Phil Stanziola. 1964. [Photograph]; Courtesy of the Library of Congress

While some of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s most memorable moments of his career happened further South, like the Montgomery bus boycott and his “I Have a Dream” speech in Washington, support for his goals hailed first from advocacy organizations based in New York City, like the National Urban League. King held sermons at Riverside Church in Morningside Heights, led a march from Central Park to the United Nations in protest of the Vietnam War, and received a Medallion of Honor from Mayor Robert Wagner. As a way to honor King and his immense impact on the advancement of civil rights, the city has named streets, parks, playgrounds, and more after the icon. On MLK Day this Monday, celebrate by learning about memorials dedicated to him citywide.

Learn more about NYC’s MLK memorials here

Harlem, New Developments

All renderings courtesy of Janus Property Company

As the construction of New York City’s newest life science building nears completion, we’re getting a fresh look at the innovative structure. Developed by the Janus Property Company, the 11-story Taystee Lab Building is part of the Manhattanville Factory District, a West Harlem neighborhood once full of breweries and factories that is now being transformed into a modern commercial and office hub. The 350,000-square-foot Taystee Lab Building, named after the bread bakery that once occupied the site, will provide mixed-use space for life science, academic, and creative tenants.

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Harlem, New Developments

Rendering credit: Beyer Blinder Belle

Trader Joe’s will join Target at a major new mixed-use development in Harlem. It will be the grocery store’s 13th location in New York City. The $242 million project is known as the Urban League Empowerment Center, as it will be home to a new headquarters for the National Urban League and the state’s first civil rights museum. It will also include 170 affordable and mixed-income apartments and office space for local nonprofits.

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Harlem, Restaurants

Parklet designed by Brandt:Haferd for The Row and Alibi Lounge. All photos by New Kingston Media

The stately brick homes lining West 138th and 139th Streets between Adam Clayton Powell Jr. and Frederick Douglass Boulevards are known as Strivers’ Row. The historic Harlem enclave was once home to prominent, wealthy African-American performers, artists, and professionals. More than 100 years later, the neighborhood is once again leading the community with a new outdoor dining and recreation corridor that supports Black-owned businesses. Called the Renaissance Pavilion at Strivers’ Row, the winterized outdoor setup will help local businesses and restaurants serve customers safely through April of next year.

More details here

Harlem, Manhattan, Restaurants

Photo courtesy of Thrillist

Noncelebrity New Yorkers will finally be able to taste the iconic Italian food of Rao’s, long considered the city’s most exclusive restaurant. As part of a joint program led by culture brand Thrillist and ghost kitchen operations company Zuul, the East Harlem institution will offer delivery of its signature dishes for the first time ever. As part of the program, ten New York City restaurants will lead a two-week chef residency with limited-edition menu items available for takeout and delivery.

Details here

Featured Story

Features, Harlem, History

New York’s famous 369th (Old 15th) Infantry Regiment arrives home from France. From the National Archives via Wikimedia Commons

By the end of World War II, the Croix de Guerre, France’s highest military honor, would be awarded to the 369th Infantry Regiment. Better known as the Harlem Hellfighters, the regiment was an all-black American unit serving under French command in World War I, and they spent a stunning 191 days at the Front, more than any other American unit. In that time, they never lost a trench to the enemy or a man to capture. Instead, they earned the respect of both allies and enemies, helped introduce Jazz to France, and returned home to a grateful city where hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers turned out to welcome home 3,000 Hellfighter heroes in a victory parade that stretched from 23rd Street and 5th Avenue to 145th Street and Lenox.

The whole history

Harlem, New Developments, Rentals

Photo courtesy of NOISE

Living in a starchitect-designed apartment building is now slightly more attainable. The Smile, a new rental tower in East Harlem designed by BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group, has officially opened. The 11-story tower at 158 East 126th Street, named for its grin-like shape, contains 233 apartments, 70 of which are affordable. Leasing kicked off in September, with pricing for the market-rate rentals starting at roughly $2,056/month. New photos released this week take us inside the minimalist model residences and the impressive amenity package that is tailored to those working from home, including a co-working studio and a rooftop with a plunge pool, three whirlpools, and an outdoor movie theater.

Find out more

Cool Listings, Harlem

$5.75M brownstone in historic Harlem has a secret garden

By Dana Schulz, Wed, September 2, 2020

Listing photos courtesy of The Corcoran Group

The brownstones of Harlem‘s Mount Morris Park Historic District are some of the most beautiful in Manhattan, like this one at 105 West 122nd Street, which is breathtaking inside and out. This grand, Italianate home was built in 1920 and underwent a gut renovation in 2008 in which historic details like stained glass, woodwork, and moldings were all restored. It also included a new design for the rear garden, which is now a magical retreat. The five-bedroom home is now listed for $5,750,000.

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