Greenwich Village

Celebrities, Greenwich Village, Recent Sales

Jessica Lange is movin’ on up. According to city property records first spotted by The Real Deal, the Academy-award winning actress bought the two-bedroom co-op directly above her current home in 1 Fifth Avenue. Lange paid $3.3 million, more than $500,000 under the asking price, for the sun-filled unit, which is much in need of updating. But this won’t be a problem if the speculation that she’s looking to combine the two apartments is true.

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Celebrities, Cool Listings, Greenwich Village

11 5th Avenue, The Brevoort, Buddy Holly apartment, Buddy Holly Greenwich Village

Before his untimely death in 1959–the “day the music died”–Buddy Holly briefly lived at the then-brand-new Brevoort apartment building in Greenwich Village. His band the Crickets had moved to NYC in 1958 to be a part of the music scene, so Holly and new wife Maria Elena Santiago rented a corner two-bedroom apartment with a wrap-around terrace for just $1,000 a month. This unit, where he made his final recordings of “Crying,” “Waiting, Hoping,” and “Peggy Sue Got Married,” has just hit the market for $1,595,000 (h/t Curbed).

See his former home

Celebrities, Cool Listings, Greenwich Village

59 West 12th Street, Marisa Tomei, Celebrities, Cool listings, Greenwich Village, co-ops

Image of Marisa Tomei via Wikimedia Commons.

Oscar-winner Marisa Tomei has put her longtime home in the Emery Roth-designed Bing & Bing co-op at 59 West 12th Street up for sale. The actress carved out the custom home for herself by combining her original unit with a neighbor’s for 2,265 square feet of living space, then bestowed it with a top-to-toe designer-assisted renovation (h/t Curbed). The high-floor Greenwich Village home has two terraces and open downtown Manhattan views.

Get a closer look

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East Village, Features, Greenwich Village, GVSHP, History, People

Elizabeth Blackwell’s NYC: The historic sites where America’s first female doctor made her mark

By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, Thu, May 17, 2018

An 1870 newspaper illustration of Elizabeth Blackwell giving an anatomy lecture alongside a corpse at the Woman’s Medical College of New York Infirmary. Courtesy of the U.S. Library of Congress.

One of the most radical and influential women of the 19th century changed the course of public health history while living and working in Greenwich Village and the East Village. Elizabeth Blackwell, America’s first female doctor, established cutting-edge care facilities and practices throughout these neighborhoods, the imprint of which can still be felt to this day in surviving institutions and buildings. In fact, one recently received a historic plaque to mark this ground-breaking but often overlooked piece of our history.

Take a tour of Elizabeth Blackwell’s NYC

Celebrities, Greenwich Village, Recent Sales

Though she’s spent most of her career in LaLa Land filming “Gilmore Girls” and “Parenthood,” actress Lauren Graham has also kept a NYC crash pad for years. Unsurprisingly, the laid-back Graham chose to set up Downtown, buying a one-bedroom co-op at 24 Fifth Avenue, just two blocks north of Washington Square Park, for $570,000 in 2014. She’s now unloaded the lovely little place for $825,000, according to city records.

See the whole place

Architecture, Greenwich Village, Landmarks Preservation Commission, Union Square

827-831 Broadway, DXA Studio, LPC

Revised rendering via DXA Studio

Last November, the owner of newly-landmarked buildings at 827-831 Broadway, noted for their cast-iron architecture and as the home of artist Willem de Kooning, submitted a proposal for a four-story prismatic glass addition and landscaped roof terrace that architects DXA Studio say was influenced by de Kooning’s work. After sending the plan back to the drawing board twice, the Landmarks Preservation Commission on Monday finally approved the revised design, which reduces the height of the addition to three stories and places it more setback from the street. LPC recommends that DXA use a darker cladding material over 47 East 12th Street to give it a totally matte finish.

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City Living, Greenwich Village, Restaurants

magnolia bakery

Image: Shiny Things via Flickr

We know “Sex and the City” did wonders for pink martinis, Manolos and Cynthia Nixon’s political career. And we’re pretty sure the cupcakes at Magnolia Bakery have the NYC-centric series to thank for its ability to expand worldwide. The popular pastries are, we’re told, gobbling up the market in Dubai, Kuwait, Tokyo, Mexico City and Seoul, and closer to home in (besides New York City) Los Angeles, Chicago and now Boston. But like Ms. Nixon, the company isn’t content to rest on its laurels. The Wall Street Journal reports that the Bleecker Street original will be plying its sweet treats in as many as 200 new franchises in the U.S. in the next five years

How many cupcakes is too many?

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Features, Greenwich Village, GVSHP, History, People

Jane Jacobs’ NYC: The sites that inspired her work and preservation legacy

By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, Fri, May 4, 2018

Washington Square Park via Wiki Commons; Jane Jacobs via Wiki Commons

Jane Jacobs’ birthday on May 4 is marked throughout the world as an occasion to celebrate one’s own city — its history, diversity, and continued vitality. “Jane’s Walks” are conducted across the country to encourage average citizens to appreciate and engage the complex and dazzling ecosystems which make up our cityscapes (Here in NYC, MAS is hosting 200+ free walks throughout the city from today through Sunday). But there’s no place better to appreciate all things Jane Jacobs than Greenwich Village, the neighborhood in which she lived and which so informed and inspired her writings and activism, in turn helping to save it from destruction.

Tour Jane Jacobs’ NYC

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Features, Greenwich Village, GVSHP, History

Edward Hopper’s Greenwich Village: The real-life inspirations behind his paintings

By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, Fri, April 20, 2018

There’s no lack of artists deeply associated with New York. But among the many painters who’ve been inspired by our city, perhaps none has had a more enduring and deeper relationship than Edward Hopper, particularly with Greenwich Village. Hopper lived and worked in Greenwich Village during nearly his entire adult life, and drew much inspiration from his surroundings. He rarely painted scenes exactly as they were, but focused on elements that conveyed a mood or a feeling. Hopper also liked to capture scenes which were anachronistic, even in the early 20th century. Fortunately due to the Village’s enduring passion for historic preservation, many, if not all, of the places which inspired Hopper nearly a century ago can still be seen today – or at least evidence of them.

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Architecture, Greenwich Village, New Developments

Current side via Wikimedia; 799 Broadway Rendering via Perkins+Will

Plans for the office development proposed on the site of the former St. Denis Hotel in the East Village progressed last week, after Normandy Real Estate Partners filed new permit applications. Located at 799 Broadway, the 165-year-old hotel will be demolished and later replaced with a 12-story office building. New permits reveal a change in architects, from CetraRuddy to Perkins+Will as well as a slight shrinkage of space, from 190,000 to 183,000 square feet (h/t The Real Deal).

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