East Village

Celebrities, Cool Listings, East Village, Interiors

232 East 6th Street, Gemma Ward

Australian supermodel Gemma Ward bought her East Village apartment in 2007 for $1.5 million, when she was only 20 years old, undertaking a gut renovation of the three-bedroom pad at 232 East 6th Street. But considering that, at age 16, she was the youngest model ever to appear on the cover of American Vogue, entering the NYC real estate game at 20 isn’t that shocking. And she has now listed the pre-war apartment for $2.25 million, according to the Daily News.

Tour the stylish pad here

Cool Listings, East Village, Interiors

102 East 10th Street, historic duplex with English basement, Peter Stuyvesant

Renters looking to enjoy a peaceful haven in the middle of the vitality of the East Village are certain to be drawn to this two-bedroom duplex at 102 East 10th Street, asking $7,500 per month. The parlor duplex with an English basement is located in a historic townhome designed by Peter Gerard Stuyvesant (the great, great grandchild of Peter Stuyvesant) and is situated less than a block from the Renwick Triangle. Original details and a private terrace make the charming home much more of a pleasant retreat than you’d imagine would be found in such a convenient location.

More photos inside

Cool Listings, East Village, Interiors

carriage house, 211-213 East 2nd Street, east village, condo east village,

From beats like Allen Ginsberg to ’80s artists like Keith Haring, the East Village was once home to the city’s hippest New York icons (and, some may argue, still is). But since its heyday, the neighborhood has become an extremely sought after part of the city, and this East Village pad that was recently put on the market is fully stacked in the hipness department. The four-bedroom unit is located at 211 East 2nd Street and is currently listed for $2,695,000. From the Carriage House condominium’s unique exterior to the edgy, rustic interior, this home is sure to make you the coolest kid on the block.

Tour this East Village beauty here

Cool Listings, East Village, Interiors

211 East 3rd Street 2, famous east village condo, real estate east village

On any given day New York City has the potential to make all of your dreams come true, and this beautiful three-bedroom East Village condo, located at 211 East 3rd Street, might make that dream a little sweeter. This amazing property underwent an all-inclusive renovation just two years ago, and the result is an exquisitely curated interior enhanced by architectural sophistication that is sure to grab your attention. The renovation also garnered features in Martha Stewart Living, the Wall Street Journal and several other magazines and papers.

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City Living, East Village, History

bowery poetry club

Jam-packed full of boutiques, bars, and a booming frat scene, the East Village‘s past as a haven for artists and other creatives is quickly being forgotten. But from the 1950s through the 60s, the Village was the epicenter of beat poetry and was once the stomping grounds of lit’s most prolific.

For more than sixty years there has been an intense poetry scene happening in the East Village. Passing Stranger, a project by WNYC’s Pejk Malinovski and The Poetry Foundation, is an interactive documentary experience that brings listeners through two miles of the East Village via the poetry and poets of the 1950s up to the present. If you love podcasts such as This American Life and 99% Invisible, you’ll love this sound-rich audio tour which will get you out and about on a beautiful fall day, and enlighten you on one of the most important bohemian communities to exist.

More on the project and podcast

Featured Story

East Village, Features, History

Peeking into the East Village’s Marble Cemeteries

By Dana Schulz, Fri, October 17, 2014

New York City Marble Cemetery, East Village history, historic NYC cemeteries

Today we think of cemeteries as spooky, haunted places that we avoid, or as sad, depressing spots reserved for funerals. But they were once quite the opposite–in fact, they were the earliest incarnations of public parks. In New York City, burials took place on private or church property up until the mid-1800’s when commercial cemeteries began popping up. And in the East Village there are two such early burial grounds hidden among the townhouses and tenements–the New York Marble Cemetery (on the west side of Second Avenue just above Second Street) and the New York City Marble Cemetery (on the north side of Second Street between First and Second Avenues).

Though their titles are extremely similar and they’re located less than a block apart, the two cemeteries are operated separately and have their own unique history. And during openhousenewyork weekend, we were lucky enough to take a peek beyond the cast iron gates and into these important pieces of the East Village’s past.

Explore the Marble Cemeteries

Cool Listings, East Village, Greenwich Village, Interiors, Noho

1 Bond St #2D, Robbins & Appleton Building, Stephen Decatur Hatch

Is this a case of buyer’s remorse? Just nine months after selling for $1.925 million, apartment 2D at 1 Bond Street has found its way back on the market, this time asking $2.195 million. The 1,205-square-foot unit is a modern take on a classic loft with tall beamed ceilings, exposed brick walls, brand new oak hardwoods, and original cast-iron columns. Add to that, a strategic layout that makes the most of the natural light flooding in from the space’s four oversized windows, and you have a luminous haven in a prime location.

Take a look inside, here

Cool Listings, East Village, Greenwich Village, Interiors, Union Square

59 Fourth Avenue, flexible layout, barrel-vaulted ceilings

The two-bedroom apartment at 59 Fourth Avenue is still sitting on the market six months after it first popped up. After an unfruitful summer and several price chops from its $3 million price tag, today the seller is asking a reduced $2.5 million for the East Village pad. While the loft has some interesting dimensions, it still has much in the way of character, and the flexible layout allows for creative adjustments. Add to that a sublime roof deck and a prime location at the intersection of Greenwich Village, East Village and Union Square, and this unique unit could be a winner. But we’ll let you be the judge.

Let’s take a look inside

Cool Listings, East Village, Interiors

Wonderful East Village Penthouse Has a Vegetable Garden

By Aisha Carter, Fri, October 3, 2014

217 2nd Avenue, industrial chic kitchen, vegetable garden, stamped steel spiral staircase

Just this August we took a glimpse inside an adorable East Village apartment at 217 2nd Avenue with not one, but two gardens. Now, the penthouse of the same building is on the market, asking $2.8 million; and just like its neighbor, this apartment charms from start to finish.

This full-floor condo manages to seamlessly blend old-world New York with rustic touches such as wide plank pine floors, vintage oak cabinets and a “lovingly worn” marble sink. Enter the home to find the industrial chic commercial grade kitchen with a skylight and a spiral staircase, which we’ll get to later.

Take a look inside, here

Featured Story

East Village, Features, History

Little Germany, St. Mark's Place

Before there were sports bars and college dorms, there were bratwurst and shooting clubs. In 1855, New York had the third largest German-speaking population in the world, outside of Vienna and Berlin, and the majority of these immigrants settled in what is today the heart of the East Village.

Known as “Little Germany” or Kleindeutschland (or Dutchtown by the Irish), the area comprised roughly 400 blocks, with Tompkins Square Park at the center. Avenue B was called German Broadway and was the main commercial artery of the neighborhood. Every building along the avenue followed a similar pattern–workshop in the basement, retail store on the first floor, and markets along the partly roofed sidewalk. Thousands of beer halls, oyster saloons, and grocery stores lined Avenue A, and the Bowery, the western terminus of Little Germany, was filled with theaters.

The bustling neighborhood began to lose its German residents in the late nineteenth century when Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe move in, and a horrific disaster in 1904 sealed the community’s fate.

Read our full history of Kleindeutschland

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