Sunset Park

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Features, Interviews, People, Sunset Park, Where I Work

Industry City is a six million-square-foot, 30-acre industrial complex on the Sunset Park waterfront. Its 16 buildings made up the former Bush Terminal, a manufacturing, warehousing and distribution center that opened in 1895. After falling into disrepair over the past few decades, in 2013, a new ownership team led by Belvedere Capital and Jamestown began their $1 billion undertaking to update the complex while cultivating a diverse tenant mix that fuses today’s burgeoning innovation economy with traditional manufacturing and artisanal craft.

Today, there are more than 4,500 people and 400 companies working in Industry City, and 6sqft recently paid a visit to four of them (a handbag designer, lighting designer, candle company, and chocolatier) to learn why the complex makes sense for their business and what unique opportunities it’s afforded them. We also spoke with Industry City CEO Andrew Kimball about the unprecedented success of the complex and his visions for the future, as well as took a tour of the buildings and their wildly popular public amenity spaces such as the food hall, outdoor courtyards, and tenant lounge.

All this and more ahead

Sunset Park, Transportation

Work at the South Brooklyn Marine Terminal, via Scott Ettin for DNAinfo

Sunset Park was recently named one of the 15 coolest neighborhoods in the country, due in large part to the burgeoning success of Industry City and the Bush Terminal Park. And in addition to its booming creative sector, the ‘hood can now include a revival of its shipping industry on its growing list of assets. As DNAinfo reports, on June 28th a cargo ship from Denmark carrying large crane parts for construction of Staten Island’s New York Wheel arrived at the South Brooklyn Marine Terminal (SBMT), where it was docked for five days with around 30 union longshoreman moving the cargo. This was the first shipment to the site in more than 10 years, revitalizing it as “a working maritime port facility” that will hopefully create hundreds of jobs.

Find out more

Cool Listings, Sunset Park

While it may not be palatial, this sweet three-bedroom, two-story (plus finished basement) townhouse at 455 37th Street in Sunset Park on a lovely street of tidy 1900s row houses would make a terrific “condo alternative.” Sunset Park, which the listing reminds us was recently dubbed the nation’s number one “edgy cool” neighborhood, is indeed a rising star. With exciting projects in the works at Industry City, an amazingly diverse mix of residents, proximity to transportation, parks and the waterfront and even a recent turn as the winter home of the Brooklyn Flea, Sunset Park is one of those places you might wish you’d moved to years ago.

But there are still deals to be had among the just-as-diverse housing choices, like this well-preserved home asking $1.405 million. And a magical back yard with an utterly charming garden studio are definitely something you won’t find in most condos.

Take a look inside

Polls, real estate trends, Sunset Park

sunset park

Move over Bushwick and Williamsburg, Sunset Park is the new cool kid in the borough. Curbed shared a report from Cushman & Wakefield that names the 100 coolest streets in the country, and coming in among the top 15 neighborhoods is Sunset Park, “where boxes and independents co-exist.” The report points to a bohemian exodus from Williamsburg, which has become more mainstream and pricey. And though hipsters are moving to ‘hoods like Bed Stuy and Crown Heights, Sunset Park outdoes them with a unique type of retail growth and creative sector thanks to the Bush Terminal Park and Industry City. The millennial population is about 27 percent and the average household income is $81,529.

Let us know if you agree with this analysis

Sunset Park, Urban Design

NYC-based design firm Buro Koray Duman has come up with a series of plans to use the under-utilized space beneath the BQE in a site near Sunset Park‘s Industry City, the massive waterfront industrial complex which itself has recently experienced a renaissance as a hub for designers and local manufacturers. The elevated highway separates Industry City from the rest of the neighborhood, and the proposed uses would connect the space beneath with the creative and commercial energy of the complex. According to Dezeen, the firm saw an opportunity to put the empty sub-highway space to good use and add “more color and convenience to the city’s daily life.”

Find out more about the two ideas for the under-highway space

photography, Sunset Park

Each day, the 11-acre Sims Municipal Recycling facility unloads up to 450 tons of waste on a city-owned pier (on what used to be an NYPD impoundment lot) in the South Brooklyn Marine Terminal. Though this seems like a dirty job, the process of recycling all this glass and plastic turns out to be strangely beautiful. CityLab recently explored the facility’s photogenic quality through Instagram photos and talked to its manager to learn that recycling in NYC is not an urban myth like some people believe. In fact, since 2013, around 7,000 guests have toured the Sims facility.

Get a look at what they saw

Featured Story

Brooklyn, Features, Sunset Park, Technology

MakerBot, MakerBot Factory Grand Opening, Ribbon Cutting, Industry City, Made in Brooklyn, 3D Printing

MakerBot has officially opened its brand new factory in Industry City in Brooklyn’s Sunset Park. The 170,000-square-foot space spans three floors, with the main production lines on the third floor of the building. The new location is four times larger than the company’s previous Industry City location and will allow the company to double its production of 3D printers. This is far cry from the garage it started out in nearly two and a half years ago.

MakerBot kicked off the opening of its new locale yesterday with a ribbon-cutting ceremony that featured MakerBot CEO Jonathan Jaglom and Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams. We were on the scene to capture this latest milestone for the 3D printer company.

Have a closer look here

Featured Story

Brooklyn, Features, Interviews, New Yorker Spotlight, People, Sunset Park

Blue Marble Ice Cream, Alexis Gallivan, Jennie Dundas

Blue Marble co-founders Alexis Gallivan (L) and Jennie Dundas (R) in one of their scoop shops, via Blue Marble

Spring may have taken its time this year, but the sun is shining, the trees are finally starting to bloom, and this means one thing–it’s officially ice cream season. If you’re looking for the perfect local scoop, which also happens to be consciously sourced and organic, then you might just stop by Blue Marble Ice Cream’s Cobble Hill or Prospect Heights shops or pick up one of their pints on your next grocery store trip.

Blue Marble Ice Cream was co-founded in 2007 by former roommates turned entrepreneurs Jennie Dundas and Alexis Gallivan. For Jennie and Alexis, who originally connected on Craiglist, a love of ice cream inspired them to open a scoop shop. And while neither had a business background, they were determined and opened up in Brooklyn. Fast forward several years, and Blue Marble is ready to expand nationwide after being picked up by a number of major supermarket chains. On a local scale, they’re part of a wave of businesses helping to transform Industry City in Sunset Park, Brooklyn, something of which the company is extremely proud.

We recently spoke with Jennie to get the scoop on Blue Marble’s founding, its headquarters in Industry City, and of course, to find out why ice cream is everyone’s favorite warm-weather (or year-round!) treat.

Read our interview with Jennie here

adaptive reuse, Major Developments, Sunset Park

Industry City, Sunset Park, Jamestown Properties, Bush Terminal

For the past year or so we’ve heard plenty of chirpings about Industry City, the former Bush Terminal on the Sunset Park waterfront that Jamestown Properties plans to transform into “a dynamic 21st century innovation and manufacturing community that balances existing manufacturing tenants with those centered on creative and innovation economy fields.” But now, Jamestown, along with fellow owners Belvedere Capital, and Angelo Gordon, have announced that the overhaul of the 32-acre complex’s 16 buildings will cost $1 billion and include a hotel, along with a huge amount of retail and tech start-up space. They also want an additional $115 million in infrastructure improvements like a massive new parking lot, as well as some rezoning concessions.

Find out more about the future of Industry City

Sunset Park, Urban Design

Bush Terminal Piers Park, Sunset Park

Sunset Park has gotten people’s attention in recent months–ours included–thanks to an influx of creative and commercial opportunities, as well as the major Industry City development. Located in the former Bush Terminal, the 16-building, 6.5 million-square-foot complex is being remodeled with the intent of creating “a dynamic 21st century innovation and manufacturing community that balances existing manufacturing tenants with those centered on creative and innovation economy fields.” And adjacent to the site is Liberty View Industrial Plaza, an eight-story, 1.2 million-square-foot warehouse that will offer work space.

These waterfront developments are touting Sunset Park as a walk-to-work neighborhood, and now residents will have a new park to stroll through on their way in to the office. Bush Terminal Piers Park opened this week after being in the works since the ’90s. Extending from 45th to 50th Streets along the waterfront, Brooklyn’s newest park sits atop a former toxic waste site, but was cleaned up over the past decade and now offers an esplanade overlooking tide ponds and restored wetlands.

More on the park and its surrounding neighborhood

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