Red Hook

Cool Listings, Interiors, Red Hook

This three-family brick townhouse comes from Brooklyn’s waterfront neighborhood of Red Hook. The area is known for its striking views of the Lower Manhattan skyline, and the listing promises those same views from the top floor of this home, located at 371 Van Brunt Street. Add in tin ceilings and fireplaces throughout the lower levels, and the historic property, now on the market for $2.5M, is sure to charm.

Time to check it out

Cool Listings, Interiors, Red Hook

A unique property in a unique neighborhood has hit the market for a cool $1.9 million. 97 King Street, in the waterfront neighborhood of Red Hook, is a newer construction building inspired by the carriage house design. The three-story property holds a 270-square-foot garage on the ground floor–currently home to the textile company Artemisia–and living space above. It’s topped with an impressive roof deck that looks over Lower Manhattan and the surrounding waterfront.

Go inside

Architecture, Construction Update, New Developments, Red Hook, Starchitecture

red hoek point waterfront rendering, norman foster red hook

In October 6sqft reported that work on Thor Equities‘ 7.7-acre waterfront office and retail complex, architect Norman Foster‘s first Brooklyn commission, had begun. A recent meeting between the developers’ representatives and community members to discuss plans for the 818,000-square-foot two-building project on the former site of Red Hook’s Revere Sugar Refinery–known as Red Hoek Point–revealed concerns that the Red Hook community is being excluded from development plans.

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Featured Story

Features, Interiors, My SQFT House Tours, Red Hook

Our ongoing series “My sqft” checks out the homes of 6sqft’s friends and fellow New Yorkers across all the boroughs. Our latest interior adventure brings us to the Red Hook rowhouse where rug designer Amy Helfand both works and lives with her family. Want to see your home featured here? Get in touch!

Artist Amy Helfand has been creating her own line of rugs for over a decade. The gorgeous pieces are hand-woven in Nepal as part of the GoodWeave program, but the design process takes place in Amy’s charming Red Hook rowhouse, where she and her family also reside. As she explains, “At heart, I remain a collector: of images, forms and colors, as well as rocks, sticks, and other ephemera from the natural world,” and it’s this combination of geometry and organic inspiration that’s seen throughout her home and studio. From a dining table centerpiece made of rocks to the chicken coop in the backyard, everything reflects Amy’s unique vision. 6sqft recently toured the home and found out about Amy’s favorite decor, artistic process, thoughts on the neighborhood, and how they rebuilt after Hurricane Sandy.

Take the tour this way

Architecture, Construction Update, New Developments, Red Hook, Starchitecture

red hoek point waterfront rendering, norman foster red hook

After revealing plans in June for Norman Foster‘s first commission in Brooklyn, Thor Equities now announces that work has commenced on Red Hoek Point, the 7.7-acre waterfront office campus. The press release also brings news that the project’s two buildings, totaling 818,000 square feet, will become “the largest new heavy timber structure in North America.”

More details ahead

Cool Listings, Red Hook

98 Pioneer Street, brooklyn, townhouse, Red Hook, interiors, cool listing, two-family, condo alternative

While this compact and cute townhouse at 98 Pioneer Street on one of Red Hook‘s most Red Hook-y blocks may not be a grand mansion, at 2,148 square feet, it’s bigger than most condos in its ($1.6 million) price range, and there’s plenty of value packed in. First, a separate studio apartment with a garage and workshop, renovated and suitably adorable with garden access, is ready to be rented for extra income or used as a workspace or guest suite. There’s a lovely landscaped garden, two additional balconies and plenty of thoughtful, modern renovations that you might find in newly-minted apartments with far less charm.

Take the tour

Red Hook, Urban Design

AECOM, Red Hook development, Brooklyn affordable housing

What do you get when you cross the new-waterfront nature of Battery Park City with the previous underutilization of Hudson Yards, and throw in a little Brooklyn? This massive proposal from big-time construction and engineering firm AECOM that would turn a huge section of the Red Hook waterfront into a residential mega-development with more than 12 towers, 45,000 units of housing (25 percent of which would be affordable), an extension of the 1 train, acres of parkland, and “waterfront-flood protections that would revitalize and protect the low-lying neighborhood from storms and future sea-level rise,” as Crain’s first reported.

AECOM is presenting the idea today at the NYU Rudin Center for Transportation. They’ve already admitted that it “lacks key details” like hard costs, but they do estimate that one of their scenarios could generate $130 million in revenue for the city. The sites in question are the 80-acre Red Hook Container Terminal owned by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, a similarly sized parcel along Columbia Street overlooking the Gowanus Bay that’s owned by the city, and unused land at the Red Hook Houses. Under their plan, the sale or lease of land to developers, would fund the aforementioned infrastructure projects.

More details and renderings ahead

Red Hook, Transportation

Just yesterday, 6sqft took a look at reports that the Brooklyn-Queens streetcar will require a train yard/maintenance facility that will likely take up an entire city block and cost around $100 million (which is included in the $2.5 billion overall cost). Finding such a large swath of available real estate would be challenging, but a local industrialist wants to ease the burden by offering up his own property.

Crain’s tells us that John Quadrozzi Jr., owner of the GBX Gowanus Bay Terminal on the Red Hook waterfront, wants the city to consider his site to host the train yard. The Terminal, which was originally constructed in 1922 as the New York Port Authority Grain Terminal, is a 13-acre shipping depot with an additional 33 acres of underwater property that’s used for concerts, film shoots, and commercial offices, and it’s expected to be very close to the streetcar’s route.

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Architecture, New Developments, Red Hook, Starchitecture

280 Richards Street, Revere Sugar Factory, Norman Foster, Red Hook development, Thor Equities

In June, 6sqft revealed renderings of Norman Foster‘s first commission in Brooklyn, the waterfront complex from Thor Equities planned for the former Revere Sugar Factory site in Red Hook. The sole rendering showed “his signature mix of contemporary panache (glassy construction with a cantilevering portion) and contextual thoughtfulness (low-scale, boxy structures in keeping with the industrial area).”

Now, a second rendering comes to us via Curbed, which shows off the structure’s “undulating penthouses and combined 3.6 acres of green roof.” They’ve also noted that the project has an official website, leasing is underway, and it’s been dubbed Red Hoek Point, a play on the area’s Dutch name Roode Hoek from the 1600s.

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Architecture, New Developments, Red Hook, Starchitecture

Thor Red Hook development, Norman Foster, Red Hook waterfront, 280 Richards Street

Back in 2005, the Joesph Sitt-led Thor Equities spent $40 million on a vacant, 7.7-acre parcel of land in Red Hook that juts 700 feet into the Erie Basin, between the Ikea parking lot and the Fairway. Preliminary visions for the former Revere Sugar Factory site included retail, office space, and residential buildings, but according to a press release sent out today by Thor, there will be no housing.

Today’s major announcement, however, is the architect selection: Norman Foster will helm the design of the new waterfront office complex, which will “include two heavy timber frame buildings totaling more than 600,000 square feet of creative office space, and 23,000 square feet of retail and restaurant space.” Foster is a surprising choice for the project, as his commissions are typically flashy and in high-profile areas like Midtown or the Financial District. In fact, this will be his first building in Brooklyn. But the sole rendering shows his signature mix of contemporary panache (glassy construction with a cantilevering portion) and contextual thoughtfulness (low-scale, boxy structures in keeping with the industrial area).

More details ahead

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