Neighborhoods

Featured Story

Features, Greenwich Village, History

“Mourners from the Ladies Waist and Dressmakers Union Local 25 and the United Hebrew Trades of New York march in the streets after the Triangle fire” 1911. Reproduction. The Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library, via the Luce Center at the New York Historical Society

Around 4:30pm on March 25, 1911, a fire broke out on the eighth floor of the Asch Building at Washington Place and Greene Streets, just as the young employees of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory, who occupied the building’s top three floors, were preparing to leave for the day. The Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire killed 146 people, nearly all of them Jewish and Italian immigrant women and girls who toiled in the city’s garment industry. Triangle stood out as the deadliest workplace tragedy in New York City before 9/11. It served as a bellwether in the American labor movement, galvanizing Americans in all walks of life to join the fight for industrial reform. It also highlighted the extraordinary grit and bravery of the women workers and reformers – members of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union, and the Women’s Trade Union League – who fought and died for fairer and safer working conditions in New York and around the country.

Find out the whole history

Cool Listings, Tudor City

For $345K, a Tudor City studio with views of the park

By Alexandra Alexa, Today, March 25, 2019

25 Tudor City Place

Listing images by Ben Fitchett

Tudor City, the Turtle Bay apartment complex built in the 1920s, is known for its tiny apartments that are priced to match. While this studio at 25 Tudor City Place doesn’t offer a lot of extra space, the unit comes with a generously-sized kitchenette, a new renovation, and views of the private and lush Tudor City park. It’s now on the market for $345,000 after selling in 2014 for $272,500.

Take a look inside

Events, Midtown

macys flower show

Photo: Diane Bondareff/AP Images for Macy’s

On Sunday, March 24th, Macy’s Herald Square launched its 45th annual Flower Show. This year’s theme for the two-week long floral festival is “Journey To Paradisios,” celebrating the arrival of spring by transporting visitors into a multi-dimensional world of space and adventure on the mythical planet Paradisios, traveling through eccentrically landscaped gardens and spectacular floral designs made up of more than 5,000 types of plants, trees, and flowers. The theme tells the cosmic tale of Space Flight Director Lucy Ryder and her discovery of the planet Paradisios–a pristine exoplanet, untouched by human technology and filled with resplendent plant life, as Ryder and R.H. Macy IV–pilot-turned-cosmonaut and the great-great-great grandson of Macy’s founder–set out on the adventure of a lifetime.

More resplendent plant life, this way

Flushing, History

1964 US Olympic Trials at Kissena Velodrome. From page 47 of “30 years of progress, 1934-1964 : Department of Parks : 300th anniversary of the City of New York : New York World’s Fair.” (1964). Via Internet Archive Book Images on Flickr

From the late 1890s through the 1920s, tens of thousands of New Yorkers turned out to witness the high drama of competitive bicycle speed racing. In New York, there were Velodromes (cycling tracks) at Coney Island, in the Bronx, and even at the original Madison Square Garden, where grueling six-day races called “Madisons” pushed riders to their limits. The sport fell prey to the Depression, and today there are just 26 Velodromes in the United States, including one in New York City, the Kissena Velodrome in Flushing’s Kissena Park, known to Velodrome enthusiasts as “the Track of Dreams.”

Read more

Chinatown, Lower East Side

two bridges

Rendering via Handel Architects

A group of Lower East Side residents on Friday filed a lawsuit against New York City to stop three luxury developments planned for Two Bridges. The residents, who are being represented by the Lower East Side Organized Neighbors (LESON) and the Asian-American Legal Defense Fund, argue the new skyscrapers violate zoning rules meant to protect against out-of-scale development (h/t Bowery Boogie).

Learn more

Brooklyn, Events

Image via Flickr

With the weather finally warming up, there’s no better time to plan your spring and summer weekend excursions. In partnership with the Prospect Park Alliance, Turnstile Tours is offering a range of walking tours this season, exploring the history, architecture, and nature of the iconic park (h/t Brownstoner). New and seasoned visitors of the park alike will be able to discover hidden treasures, little-known tales, and learn about the Alliance’s new facilities and ongoing conservation efforts.

More info

Cool Listings, Tribeca

165 Duane Street, tribeca, lofts, cool listings,

Designed by noted architect Stephen Decatur Hatch, the classic loft building at 165 Duane Street, now a boutique co-op residence, was built in 1882 as coconut processing and packaging factory. This Tribeca loft retains the foundation of its industrial past with exposed wooden beams and columns and 14 windows, yet this three-bedroom home set high above Duane Park has the polished appearance of a classic Manhattan co-op. Asking $3.195 million, the loft has been fully renovated, adding modern convenience and considered design choices in fixtures and finishes.

Take a tour

Cool Listings, Interiors, Upper West Side 

121 West 80th Street, Upper West Side, Broadway Corridor

Listing photos by Travis Mark

This floor-through two-bedroom on the Upper West Side melds the old and the new in one of the city’s most coveted neighborhoods. Located in a boutique townhouse at 121 West 80th Street, the $1,395,000 co-op was recently renovated and decked out with marble accents and top-of-the-line amenities to bring modern comforts into the home. But its old-world charm still comes through in the restored moldings and millwork. 

Take a look inside

Brooklyn Heights, Design

Rendering by Kameny Design and Taylor Davenport, courtesy of Mark Baker

A longtime Brooklyn resident is offering his own innovative solution to fix the Brooklyn Queens Expressway. Mark Baker’s proposal involves transforming the BQE’s triple cantilever into the “Tri-Line,” a three-tiered park that extends from Brooklyn Bridge Park. Modeled after Manhattan’s High Line, the Tri-Line parks would measure 1,880 feet long and include gardens, seating, walking paths, and bike lanes. As the Brooklyn Eagle reported, cars and trucks would be rerouted along a new highway on Furman Street, preserving the Brooklyn Heights Promenade and adding eight acres of park space in the process.

See the proposal

Featured Story

Features, Greenwich Village, GVSHP, History

13 places in Greenwich Village where the course of history was changed

By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, Thu, March 21, 2019

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the designation of the Greenwich Village Historic District.  One of the city’s oldest and largest landmark districts, it’s a treasure trove of rich history, pioneering culture, and charming architecture. Village Preservation will be spending 2019 marking this anniversary with events, lectures, and new interactive online resources, including a celebration and district-wide weekend-long “Open House” starting on Saturday, April 13 in Washington Square.  Check here for updates and more details. This is part of a series of posts about the Greenwich Village Historic District marking its golden anniversary.

It’s not that often you can pinpoint a time and place and say the course of history was forever changed as a result of it. It’s even less common for such a thing to happen over and over again in one small neighborhood. But from its earliest days, Greenwich Village is where history has been made, much of it within the Greenwich Village Historic District, which lies at its heart. Here are a baker’s dozen of such events located within those one hundred blocks, from the first free black settlement in North America and the birth of the modern LGBT rights movement to the first museum dedicated to contemporary American art and the publication of “The Autobiography of Malcolm X.”

All the history right this way

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS

Thank you, your sign-up request was successful!
This email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Please provide a valid email address.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.