Neighborhoods

Greenwich Village, Restaurants

stonewall, pride month, lgbt

Photo by Rhododendrites on Wikimedia

New York City’s iconic Stonewall Inn got a much-needed lifeline this week after receiving a $250,000 donation from the Gill Foundation. The Greenwich Village bar, considered the birthplace of the LGBTQ rights movement, has been closed since March because of the coronavirus pandemic and has struggled to keep up with bills, including its $40,000/month rent. But thanks to the donation, and more than $300,000 raised as part of an online fundraiser, the national historic landmark will able to survive a little longer.

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affordable housing, housing lotteries, ridgewood

Rendering courtesy of Aufgang Architects

In Ridgewood–the Queens neighborhood that’s right on the border of Bushwick, has lots going on, but is still somewhat under-the-radar–a middle-income housing lottery has just come online for those earning 130 percent of the area median income. The brand-new building, known as The Strand, offers tons of fun amenities (do note additional fees may apply) like onsite parking, a laundry room, bike storage, fitness center, outdoor terraces, co-working lounge, and a media/gaming lounge. The 40 apartments up for grabs range from $1,797/month studios to $3,508/month three-bedrooms.

Find out if you qualify

Cool Listings, Park Slope

Listing photos courtesy of Brown Harris Stevens

Built in 1893, this Romanesque brownstone is quintessential Park Slope. It’s been renovated over the years, but since most of the historic details have been restored, these modernizations have only made it better. Most notably, the whole cellar has been converted into a home gym, which is clad in the original stone walls, and the garden level is one giant family room with a second kitchen that leads out to a backyard garden. Plus, the entire third floor is devoted to the master suite, which opens to a top-floor terrace. Located at 178 8th Avenue, it’s just hit the market for $6,450,000.

Have a look

Downtown Brooklyn, History, Landmarks Preservation Commission

227 Duffield Street; Map data © 2020 Google

The Landmarks Preservation Commission on Tuesday voted to calendar a property in Downtown Brooklyn that was home to abolitionists in a move that could potentially save the historic home from demolition. Harriet and Thomas Truesdell, known members of the anti-slavery movement before the Civil War, lived at the Greek-Revival row house at 227 Duffield Street from 1851 to 1863. Last year, preservationists and local officials called on the LPC to designate the building after a developer filed permits to raze the three-story structure and replace it with a much taller mixed-use building.

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Restaurants, Williamsburg

All photos by Kate Previte

Tomorrow, Levain Bakery is opening a new location in Williamsburg, the first time New Yorkers will be able to get their hands on one of their six-ounce, deliciously gooey cookies in Brooklyn. Located at 164 North 4th Street, just off bustling Bedford Avenue, it will serve all their cookie varieties, along with bread, brioche, and coffee.

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Featured Story

Architecture, Features, Financial District, History

Woolworth Building, historic photos of the Woolworth Building, NYC then and now photos, historic NYC photos

The Woolworth Building, then and now. L: Image courtesy of Library of Congress via Wiki cc; r: Image Norbert Nagel via Wiki cc.

When the neo-Gothic Woolworth Building at 233 Broadway was erected in 1913 as the world’s tallest building, it cost a total of $13.5 million to construct. Though many have surpassed it in height, the instantly-recognizable Lower Manhattan landmark has remained one of the world’s most iconic buildings, admired for its terra cotta facade and detailed ornamentation–and its representation of the ambitious era in which it arose. Developer and five-and-dime store entrepreneur Frank Winfield Woolworth dreamed of an unforgettable skyscraper; the building’s architect, Cass Gilbert, designed and delivered just that, even as Woolworth’s vision grew progressively loftier. The Woolworth Building has remained an anchor of New York City life with its storied past and still-impressive 792-foot height.

Find the city’s history in the Woolworth Building

affordable housing, Harlem, housing lotteries, Manhattan

Photo of Victory Plaza courtesy of Camber Property Group

A lottery has opened for 94 affordable units for seniors at a new building in Harlem, with 41 of the units for formerly homeless seniors. Victory Plaza, located at 11 West 118th Street, is a 100 percent affordable building developed jointly by Camber Property Group, the Harlem Congregations for Community Improvement, and New York City.  To apply, New Yorkers must have at least one household member who is 62 years of age or older, qualify for Section 8 benefits, and earn $51, 200 or less, annually. Eligible applicants will pay 30 percent of their income for the studio and one-bedroom apartments.

More here

affordable housing, Bronx, housing lotteries

Rendering courtesy of RKTB Architects

Applications are now being accepted for 96 income-restricted apartments in the South Bronx, with half of those units set aside for seniors. Located at 700 Manida Street, the Hunts Point rental contains eight stories and 108 total units. To apply for the senior housing, New Yorkers must have at least one household member who is 62 years of age or older and earns $40, 960 or less, annually. Eligible applicants will pay 20, 30, or 40 percent of the area median income (AMI) for units that range from a $211/month studio to a $667/month one-bedroom. For the remaining 48 units, New Yorkers earning 40, 50, 60, 70, and 80 percent of the AMI can apply for apartments, ranging in price from an $810/month two-bedroom to $1,960/month three-bedroom.

Find out if you qualify

Cool Listings, East Village

Listing images courtesy of Brown Harris Stevens

It’s probably still shocking to old-time New Yorkers that getting a two-bedroom for under $1 million in the East Village is considered a deal, but that’s the case today. This duplex co-op at 103 East 10th Street comes in at $995,000, and in addition to its two floors and two bedrooms, it’s got a perfectly peaceful private patio.

Have a look

Cool Listings, Fort Greene

Listing photos by Yale Wagner for The Corcoran Group

Some people might snub the idea of living in the garden unit of a townhouse, but what that often affords is a private backyard, such is the case at this Fort Greene co-op. Located at 154 Lafayette Avenue and just listed for $1.6 million, the two-bedroom home also has a large lower level that’s currently configured as a second living room but could be converted to a third bedroom suite.

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