Museums

Museums, New Jersey

Rendering of The Centre Pompidou X Jersey City, courtesy OMA

When The Centre Pompidou (Pompidou Center in English) opened in Paris in 1977, it was the first collection of modern and contemporary art in Europe. Famous as much for its inside-out building designed by Renzo Piano as for its artwork, the museum has in recent years opened satellite locations in Málaga, Spain, Brussels, and Shanghai. And come 2024, they’ll open their first North American outpost in Jersey City. According to a press release, the location “will launch a strong partnership aiming to reinvent, develop and activate Jersey City Journal Square’s iconic Pathside Building.”

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Landmarks Preservation Commission, Major Developments, Museums, New Developments, South Street Seaport

The approved design. All renderings courtesy of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill / Howard Hughes Corporation

The Landmarks Preservation Commission on Tuesday voted to approve plans for a debated mixed-use project and a new museum in the South Street Seaport. The Howard Hughes Corporation presented a revised proposal for 250 Water Street that includes one 324-foot tower to be built on a parking lot instead of the two 470-foot structures originally proposed in January. The project also involves constructing a new building for the South Street Seaport Museum at 89 South Street.

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City Living, Events, Museums, Policy

Photo by Taylor Heery on Unsplash

Entertainment and cultural venues in New York will soon welcome more visitors. Starting April 26, capacity limits at museums and zoos will be raised to 50 percent and to 33 percent at movie theaters. Starting May 19, large indoor sports arenas can increase capacity from 10 percent to 25 percent, and outdoor venues from 20 to 33 percent. In addition, Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced today that as of May 15, offices can increase capacity from 50 to 75 percent, casinos and gaming facilities from 25 to 50 percent, and gyms outside of NYC from 33 to 50 percent.

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Art, Events, Museums, Upper East Side

Installation view, The Roof Garden Commission, Alex Da Corte “As Long as the Sun Lasts,” 2021. Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, photo by Anna Marie Kellen

A 26-foot-tall moving sculpture featuring the Sesame Street character Big Bird has been installed atop the Metropolitan Museum of Art as part of the museum’s annual Roof Garden Commission series. Created by Philadelphia-based artist Alex Da Corte, As Long as the Sun Lasts exhibition includes a blue-feathered Big Bird sitting on a floating crescent moon and holding a ladder, gazing out at Central Park and the massive towers that dot the skyline. The exhibition will open at the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Roof Garden on April 16 and be on view through October 31.

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Art, Bronx, Events, Museums

Dancing Pumpkin, Courtesy of Ota Fine Arts and David Zwirner

This Saturday, April 10, the New York Botanical Garden’s hotly-anticipated exhibit KUSAMA: Cosmic Nature will open to the public and remain on view through October 31, 2021. The blockbuster show dedicated to legendary Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama was originally planned to open in May 2020, but of course, was postponed due to the pandemic. Among the works on view are Kusama’s famous polka-dot pumpkins, her larger-than-life flowers, and the famous Narcissus Garden, composed of 1,400 stainless steel spheres floating on water.

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Museums

Photo by Scott Heins/Office of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo

The morning of December 14 was historic for New York and the nation. Sandra Lindsay, an ICU nurse at the Long Island Jewish Medical Center in Queens, received the first coronavirus vaccine in the United States, marking the beginning of the end of this painful period. That moment will be preserved as part of a collection at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C., which has acquired the empty vial of the first dose and other materials related to that day, including the ID badge and scrubs of Lindsay, officials announced on Tuesday.

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Museums

Image by anielbaez0 from Pixabay

In early February, the Metropolitan Museum of Art began talks about selling some of its artworks in the face of a $150 million deficit. As the New York Times explained, the Association of Art Museum Directors created a two-year window during which its members could use the proceeds from sales of works in a collection to pay for its own expenses as opposed to just for future art purchases, as was the rule in the past. But a new Change.org petition is calling for the Met’s board members, many of whom are billionaires, to foot the bill instead of selling off its art.

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Events, Museums, Upper East Side

Photo by Ajay Suresh via Wikimedia Commons

A little over two years ago, the Frick Collection announced it would take over Madison Avenue’s famous Breuer building from the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Up until 2016, the brutalist landmark was home to the Whitney Museum of American Art, but when the Whitney moved to its new High Line building, the Met took it over as a contemporary wing. The new move allows the Met to ease the burden of some of its debt while providing a temporary home for the Frick while its permanent home–a Gilded Age mansion on Fifth Avenue-undergoes a renovation. The Frick Madison will open at 25-percent capacity on March 18.

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Art, Museums, Policy

Photo by Luca Bravo on Unsplash

Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Tuesday unveiled the “New York Arts Revival” initiative, a plan to bring art and culture back to the state after the coronavirus pandemic has brought much of the industry to a standstill. As part of a public-private partnership, the effort will bring a series of pop-up performances and arts events across New York starting February 4. According to the governor, who made the announcement during his multi-day State of the State address, the events will feature performers like Amy Schumer, Chris Rock, Wynton Marsalis, Renée Fleming, Hugh Jackman, and others. “We will not let the curtain fall on their careers or the future of our cities,” Cuomo said.

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Landmarks Preservation Commission, Major Developments, Museums, New Developments, South Street Seaport

All renderings courtesy of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill / Howard Hughes Corporation

Plans to construct two 470-foot towers and expand a museum in the historic South Street Seaport neighborhood were met with mixed feedback during a public Landmarks Preservation Commission hearing on Tuesday. The Howard Hughes Corporation presented a proposal for a $1.4 billion mixed-use project consisting of rentals, condos, and office space at 250 Water Street, as well as a new building for the South Street Seaport Museum at 89 South Street. While those in favor of the project say it will bring much-needed affordable housing to a neighborhood that has almost none and help the museum stay open, opponents claim the project is out of scale with the rest of the district. New renderings of the proposed expanded museum show plans for a copper-clad exterior, flexible gallery space, an outdoor terrace, and a connection to the historic structure.

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