More Top Stories

condos, Major Developments, Midtown, More Top Stories

central park tower, 225 west 57th street, extell development

Rendering of Central Park Tower via Extell Development

A new rendering of Central Park Tower, slated to be the tallest residential tower on Earth, shows the most sparkling image of the residential building yet. Construction for Extell Development’s supertall, located at 225 West 57th Street on Billionaires’ Row, is underway and when completed, the tower is projected to be 1,550-feet tall. As CityRealty reported, the all-glass rendering appears to be taken about 900-feet above Central Park and leaves out rivaling towers, 432 Park Avenue and 111 West 57th Street. The $2.98 billion project is expected to be completed in 2019.

Find out more

Chinatown, maps, More Top Stories

Chinatown photography, Chaz Langley

Chinatown, image © Chaz Langley

Many New Yorkers navigate Chinatown by its famous street names; East Broadway, Mulberry, Canal and Orchard. However, for many Chinese immigrants living in the area who do not speak English, these names are not used. Instead, descriptive nicknames (translated from Chinese) exist like “Hatseller Street,” “Garbage Street,” and “Dead Person Street.” Even more interesting, to help Chinese New Yorkers navigate the city, maps with these streets labeled in their Chinese nicknames are made and distributed. A reporter from This American Life, Aaron Reiss, began collecting these maps and discovered the lesser-known nicknames for a lot of these city streets, many which have four or five different labels.

More this way

affordable housing, housing lotteries, Midtown West, More Top Stories, Starchitecture, Top Stories

Danica O. Kus, 625 West 57th Street, Via 57 West, Bjarke Ingels

Photograph © Danica O. Kus

In October of 2015, 6sqft reported that applications were being accepted for the 142 affordable apartments set aside for low-income tenants at the tantalizing tetrahedron that is starchitect Bjarke Ingels’ VIA 57 West, a newly-minted rental residence at 625 West 57th Street. Word comes today that the lottery has opened for the middle-income portion of the building’s affordable housing inventory. The half-block-long residential development contains 709 units, of which 20 percent have been deemed affordable. Of the 36 middle-income units available, studios have been priced between $1,448-$1,949; $1,554-$2,091 for one-bedrooms; $2,089-$2,519 for two-bedrooms; and $2,902 for three-bedrooms, each adjusted for income.

complete details here

Featured Story

Bushwick, Features, Interiors, More Top Stories, My SQFT House Tours

Ehren Shorday, Bushwick loft, Brooklyn artist loft, trash and treasures

6sqft’s ongoing series “My sqft” checks out the homes of New Yorkers across all the boroughs. Want to see your home featured here? Get in touch!

When Ehren Shorday moved into this giant Bushwick loft a little more than six years ago, his main focus was making the industrial space feel like a home. Originally from antique-haven New Hope, he chose to go with a “southeastern Pennsylvania river town vibe,” but as an artist who didn’t have a ton of money, he achieved this aesthetic by furnishing the 900-square-foot space with “trash,” or perhaps more eloquently put, “found treasures.” Aside from the rug and his parents’ two club chairs, which he brought with him when he moved to New York 13 years ago, everything in the apartment was found, from the church pew and diner banquet table to the porcelain bathtub that’s been repurposed as a chaise lounge. Ahead, Ehren gives us the grand tour and fills us in on the story behind his prized possessions.

Take a video and photo tour and hear more from Ehren

maps, More Top Stories, Transportation

project subway, nyc subway, candy chan

Sketch of 59th Street-Columbus Circle via Candy Chan

While the official map of the New York City subway clearly labels which station comes next, it’s not very good at showing the actual geographic distance between stations or what the paths and tunnels look like in order to take the right exit. Like many New Yorkers, architect Candy Chan developed a love-hate relationship with the subway. As CityLab shares, after feeling constantly lost when trying to navigate the city underground, Chan created Project NYC Subway, which includes photographs, architectural drawings, and a series of three-dimensional sketches that display what the complex stations really look like.

See the x-ray-esque drawings

Featured Story

apartment living 101, City Living, Features, More Top Stories, NYC Guides, Top Stories

An insider’s guide for first-time homebuyers in NYC

By Alison McQueen, Mon, August 7, 2017

Photo via New York Law School/Flickr

6sqft’s ongoing series Apartment Living 101 is aimed at helping New Yorkers navigate the challenges of creating a happy home in the big city. This week, Corcoran realtor Alison McQueen shares her personal guide for first-time homebuyers in NYC.

Many first-time homebuyers in NYC are doubtful they’ll find a great place within their budget, but every single client I’ve worked with has closed on a home, and they say buying was one of the best decisions they ever made. To make this dream a reality, you’ll want a clear understanding of your finances and how much you’d like to spend; the top five things you want in a home; and a sense of your preferred neighborhoods based on potential commute, area amenities; and ideal budget. Sound overwhelming? That’s where a team of professionals comes in, including a real estate agent, real estate attorney, and home inspector. The best way to enter the purchase process is as an informed consumer, as you’ll have an easier time targeting and getting what you want. To make the process a bit easier, I’ve put together a handy list of the key things to consider when embarking on the purchase path in New York City.

All the tricks of the trade

Featured Story

Features, History, More Top Stories, photography, The urban lens, Tribeca

6sqft’s ongoing series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. In this installment, Ivan Kosnyrev shares before-and-after photos of Tribeca. Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

When Ivan Kosnyrev and his partner moved to Tribeca from Russia three years ago, they knew no one. To get themselves acclimated with their new home, they decided their first “friend” should be the city itself. Ivan, a philosopher by education and IT manager by profession, immersed himself in New York City guide books and blogs, getting so well versed that he eventually began giving his friends informal walking tours of the area. And when he discovered the New York Public Library’s OldNYC collection, an interactive map with photos from the 1870s through the 1970s, he decided to embark on a project that he could share with even more people. After selecting a group of archival Tribeca images, he went out and took present-day snapshots of the same locations, providing a neighborhood-specific view of just how much NYC has changed (and in some cases, hasn’t!) over the past 100 years.

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Celebrities, Cool Listings, Hamptons, More Top Stories

Food Network star and cookbook author Rachael Ray has put her Southampton home on the market for $4.9 million. According to the Wall Street Journal, the 3,650-square foot home sits on six acres and includes three bedrooms, state of the art kitchen and a pool with a pool house. Ray and her husband, John Cusimano, paid $2.6 million for the home in 2008. The couple thoroughly renovated the pad after buying it, filling it with the star’s own furniture brand. The home connects to the Southampton Golf Club, providing plenty of trees and beautiful gardens.

See inside

Featured Story

Features, Greenwich Village, GVSHP, History, More Top Stories, West Village 

‘Heard it through the grapevine?’ The source was probably at 6th Avenue and 11th Street

By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, Thu, August 3, 2017

6th Avenue and 11th Street, 1905. Image via Ephemeral New York,

On August 6, 1966, the first known recording of “I Heard It Through The Grapevine” was made by the Miracles. Written by Motown pioneers Norman Whitfield and Barrett Strong, the song was re-recorded several times, most famously by Gladys Night and the Pips and Marvin Gaye, whose version landed on the top of the charts for seven weeks in early 1969.

But the famous saying about receiving important news or information through a person-to-person chain of communication significantly pre-dates the Motown era. In fact, plentiful evidence and credible sources say it all goes back to a beloved tavern on the corner of 6th Avenue and 11th Street in Greenwich Village.

more on the history here

Cool Listings, Interiors, More Top Stories, Quirky Homes, Starchitecture, Upstate

petra island, frank Lloyd wright, Joe Massaro, chilton and chadwick

This private island upstate in Putnam County has an incredible backstory and stunning home (it’s also located just 15 minutes by plane from Manhattan, via the houses’s rooftop helipad), and it’s up for grabs at an ask of $14.92 million. Mansion Global shared the tale of how a Frank Lloyd Wright home, designed by the architect to rival his iconic Fallingwater, ended up on the grounds of this 11-acre, heart-shaped property known as Petra Island. Not only does it employ Wright’s signature cantilevering and series of outdoor terraces, but inside, there are giant stone boulders jutting into spaces from the living room to the shower stalls.

You must see the end result

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