maps

maps, Social Media, Transportation

Wheely, Anthony Driscoll, NYC subway app, accessible subway map

If you ride the New York City subway you likely have some type of app installed on your smart phone that provides a map of the underground system or calculates the time to the next train. And it’s just as likely that your app doesn’t have a feature for accessibility. For those who cannot push through a crowd on the stairs or bolt up the left side of the escalator, the subway is extremely hard to navigate and oftentimes quite useless, as only 18% of stations have accessible elevators. To address this major flaw in our mass transit system, Anthony Driscoll developed a new app called Wheely, which helps those with accessibility needs (wheelchair users, the elderly, parents with strollers, injured people, etc.) better navigate the subway. All the details on the smart new app here

maps, Social Media, Technology

Vincent Meertens' Subjective Map of NYC created

Social media has certainly made it easier to take a nostalgic look back in time; a quick perusal of one’s past Facebook statuses or Twitter feeds is all it takes to remind us of what we were doing last week, month, or even last year. (Yes, we know some of those photos are cringe-worthy; we have them too.) Consider all of the different places those statuses and tweets were generated from, and imagine what it might look like if you tracked all of those locations on a map of the city – a literal “walk” down memory lane, if you will.

That’s exactly what Dutch graphic designer Vincent Meertens and his girlfriend did between March 2012 and January 2013, using an application called OpenPaths. The result? An intricate series of dots and lines (10,760 data points in all) representing all of their movements through New York City.

More details ahead

Architecture, maps, Policy

nyc skyscrapers

You read it right, tall towers in New York City actually have a lower risk of being affected by an earthquake. The U.S. Geological Survey, the federal agency responsible for reporting and recording earthquake activity, recently updated their National Seismic Hazard Maps, which “reflect the best and most current understanding of where future earthquakes will occur, how often they will occur, and how hard the ground will likely shake as a result.” One change to the maps since they was last updated in 2008 is that the east coast has the potential for larger quakes than previously outlined, but residents of NYC high rises are in a slightly lower risk bracket.

Learn why straight ahead

maps, Technology, Urban Design

As New Yorkers we’re constantly on the go and our movements are very much the pulse of the city. A new smartphone app developed by Human is tracking these movements and turning them into an incredible map that beautifully visualizes how we navigate our streets. Are you part of the pack?

Find out more here

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