maps

maps, Restaurants

Mayor de Blasio and First Lady Chirlane McCray celebrate the launch of Phase 2 reopening by eating dinner at Melba’s in Harlem; Photo by Michael Appleton/Mayoral Photography Office on Flickr

Restaurants and bars officially reopened for outdoor dining this week as part of New York City’s phase two of reopening. Since Monday, more than 5,650 restaurants have applied, self-certified, and opened their sidewalk, patios, and adjacent parking spots to diners. To make it easier to find which establishments are open for al fresco dining in your neighborhood, the Department of Transportation on Friday released a dashboard and an interactive map that let New Yorkers search for open restaurants by borough and ZIP code.

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maps, Policy

A screenshot of the map taken on 5.17.20

New York now has 700+ COVID testing sites across the state and is doing twice the amount of testing of the entire rest of the country. To make it easier for residents to get themselves tested, Governor Cuomo announced on Sunday the launch of a new interactive map that will show the testing sites closest to you. He also announced that the criteria to get tested has expanded to include those who would return to work in phase one.

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City Living, maps, Restaurants

Photo by Patrick Tomasso on Unsplash

We all want to support the small businesses in our New York neighborhoods during this difficult time. But sometimes it’s hard to keep track of which stores and restaurants are currently open. A number of local websites and organizations have created easy-to-use search engines and interactive maps that provide information on open businesses.

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City Living, maps

Photo by Enrique Alarcon on Unsplash

In a dense city like New York, social distancing is no easy task. Garbage piles, sidewalk sheds, and people make it hard to maintain six feet from others, the recommended distance to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. A new interactive map created by urban planner Meli Harvey shows the width of each sidewalk in the city, with the most narrow highlighted in red and the widest in blue. As expected, there’s a lot of red on the map.

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History, Landmarks Preservation Commission, maps

Photo by Cody Nottingham on Unsplash 

Just a few years after the demolition of the original Penn Station, the city founded the Landmarks Preservation Commission, in part, to make sure beautiful historic buildings were never destroyed again. When Mayor Robert Wagner signed the Landmarks Law on April 19, 1965, the commission was officially tasked with protecting sites that represent New York’s history and culture. During its 55 years in existence, the LPC has designated more than 37,000 buildings and sites. In honor of this anniversary, the commission this week released an interactive story map highlighting its work over the last five decades, from its first individual landmark, the Claesen Wyckoff House, to its first LGBT designation, the Stonewall Inn.

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maps, Policy

Last week, Gov. Andrew Cuomo temporarily banned all non-essential construction statewide, as part of his “pause” executive order. The updated order allows only emergency construction, or work “necessary to protect the health and safety of the occupants” to occur during the coronavirus pandemic. To track projects that are considered essential in New York City during this time, the city’s Department of Buildings on Friday launched an interactive map that identifies sites where work can continue.

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City Living, maps

Photo by amsw photography from Pexels

With school closed and playdates off-limits, New York City kids are staying connected with their friends in a creative and colorful way. Children in Brooklyn are drawing and painting pictures of rainbows and displaying them outside of their homes, creating a scavenger hunt perfect for one of the only quarantine-approved activities: a walk around the neighborhood.

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History, Landmarks Preservation Commission, maps

Find landmarks of the anti-slavery movement in NYC

By Devin Gannon, Fri, December 13, 2019

landmarks preservation commission, abolitionist history nyc, slavery nyc

Screenshot of the map courtesy of the Landmarks Preservation Commission

For roughly 200 years, between 1626 and 1827, New York City was home to more enslaved Africans than almost every other city in the country. But after abolishing slavery nearly 40 years before the nation, the city became a major player of the national abolitionist movement, housing anti-slavery activists and organizations, as well as many stops on the Underground Railroad. Now 400 years after the first enslaved Africans arrived in the United States, the Landmarks Preservation Commission released this week an interactive story map highlighting designated city landmarks tied to the abolitionist movement.

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City Living, maps

New map shows over 600 languages spoken in NYC

By Devin Gannon, Wed, December 4, 2019

Screenshot of the NYC language map courtesy of the Endangered Language Alliance

More than 600 languages are spoken in the New York metropolitan area, making it one of the most linguistically diverse regions in the world. The Endangered Language Alliance (ELA), a non-profit that aims to protect endangered languages across the city and New Jersey, released this week a comprehensive map of the area’s 637 languages and dialects at nearly 1,000 sites. As first reported by Gothamist, the map coincides with the 2019 International Year of Indigenous Languages, declared by the United Nations in 2016, as well as the upcoming 2020 census.

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Events, holidays, maps

macy's thanksgiving parade 2019, thanksgiving, nyc events, holidays

Map via Google Maps/Macy’s

It’s almost time for the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, and with 2.5 miles of public viewing areas along the route this year, anyone eager to claim a good spot should be able to with a little planning. This interactive map put together by the parade organizers outlines the stretches that have the best views as well as all the areas that will be restricted to the public. The map also notes where you can find essentials like restrooms, coffee, and food.

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