Manhattan

Midtown, Recent Sales

The first of what’s sure to be many flips at One57 has just netted its seller a respectable $3.45 million profit, just five months after its purchase. According to NYDN, the former owner, Investor Sso Enterprises, paid $30.55 million for the 58th-floor three-bedroom back in May, now selling it off for $34 million to hedge fund manager Harvey Sandler and his wife.

Inside the massive apartment

Cool Listings, East Village, Interiors

Wonderful East Village Penthouse Has a Vegetable Garden

By Aisha Carter, Fri, October 3, 2014

217 2nd Avenue, industrial chic kitchen, vegetable garden, stamped steel spiral staircase

Just this August we took a glimpse inside an adorable East Village apartment at 217 2nd Avenue with not one, but two gardens. Now, the penthouse of the same building is on the market, asking $2.8 million; and just like its neighbor, this apartment charms from start to finish.

This full-floor condo manages to seamlessly blend old-world New York with rustic touches such as wide plank pine floors, vintage oak cabinets and a “lovingly worn” marble sink. Enter the home to find the industrial chic commercial grade kitchen with a skylight and a spiral staircase, which we’ll get to later.

Take a look inside, here

Architecture, Downtown Brooklyn, Major Developments, Manhattan, Starchitecture

New York supertalls, nyc towers, manhattan real estate, midtown condo, new york skyline

It seems like every week a new residential skyscraper is being announced in New York City, just earlier this week the New York Times noted that a partnership between Steven Witkoff and Harry Macklowe is moving ahead with a redevelopment of the Park Lane Hotel at 36 Central Park West with an 850-foot tower.

With the mind-boggling amount of residential spires poised to pierce the sky, here’s a quick rundown of the tallest of the tall–the spindly bunch set to soar higher than 700 feet. Keep in mind that just 30 years ago, the tallest residence in the city was perched atop the 664-foot Trump Tower. Today, buildings are on the drawing board for more than twice that height.

See our list of the 26 tallest towers

Featured Story

East Village, Features, History

Little Germany, St. Mark's Place

Before there were sports bars and college dorms, there were bratwurst and shooting clubs. In 1855, New York had the third largest German-speaking population in the world, outside of Vienna and Berlin, and the majority of these immigrants settled in what is today the heart of the East Village.

Known as “Little Germany” or Kleindeutschland (or Dutchtown by the Irish), the area comprised roughly 400 blocks, with Tompkins Square Park at the center. Avenue B was called German Broadway and was the main commercial artery of the neighborhood. Every building along the avenue followed a similar pattern–workshop in the basement, retail store on the first floor, and markets along the partly roofed sidewalk. Thousands of beer halls, oyster saloons, and grocery stores lined Avenue A, and the Bowery, the western terminus of Little Germany, was filled with theaters.

The bustling neighborhood began to lose its German residents in the late nineteenth century when Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe move in, and a horrific disaster in 1904 sealed the community’s fate.

Read our full history of Kleindeutschland

Design, Interiors, Manhattan, Tribeca

Tribeca Family Loft, Ghislaine Vinas

Sure, this beautiful Tribeca loft by designer Ghislaine Viñas has the requisite “grown up” touches. One look at the soothing palette and economy of design in the master bedroom and the word sanctuary easily comes to mind. Similarly, the kitchen’s clean lines and austere finishes are decidedly adult.

But make no mistake; this is very much a family home. Skillfully combining stark white furnishings with bursts of bright color, Viñas clearly had fun ensuring this home’s youngest inhabitants felt, well…at home.

See why children and adults alike will feel right at home

History, Interiors, Midtown

Gabellini Sheppard, Rainbow Room, 30 Rockefeller Plaza

The Rainbow Room served its first guests on October 3, 1934, and now, almost 80 years later to the day, the historic restaurant and event space has reopened after a restoration by Gabellini Sheppard Architects.

Located on the 65th floor of the Raymond Hood-designed 30 Rockefeller Plaza (30 Rock), it was the first restaurant located in a high-rise building and for decades was the highest restaurant in the country. Suffering from a decline in business, the fine-dining establishment closed its doors in 2009. But in 2012, the Rainbow Room was declared an official interior landmark by the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC), and a year later it was announced that the storied space would reopen this fall. Right on schedule, the new incarnation of the venue opened last night for a preview by the Sir John Soanes Museum Foundation.

Ogle the landmarked restaurant here

Cool Listings, Greenwich Village, Interiors

60 East 13th Street, loft conversion, apartment with skylights, hidden room behind bookcases, custom steel and glass sliding doors

A walk down 13th Street between Broadway and University Place may seem a bit uneventful in the way of architectural standouts. However, you’ll be pleasantly surprised to encounter this hidden gem at 60 East 13th Street. The handsome condominium conversion has more to offer than just a pleasantly painted façade and strong lighting. Inside it houses a stunning architectural dream of a loft, now available for $4,395,000.

Let’s take a look inside

Cool Listings, Interiors, Upper East Side

Historic Henderson Place Townhouse Asks $7.5 Million

By Aisha Carter, Thu, October 2, 2014

146 East End Avenue, Henderson Place, John C. Henderson, Lamb & Rich

Oh, how the times change. In the late 19th century, developer John C. Henderson began constructing an enclave of townhouses, designed by architectural firm Lamb & Rich, and intended for “persons of moderate means”. Today, one of those Yorkville homes is available for rent, asking $25,900 per month… or if you’d like to purchase it outright, $7.495 million.

If you’re looking for remnants of 146 East End Avenue’s low-income housing past, you’re in for a disappointment. The result of a “painstaking” two-year gut renovation, this desirable dwelling only speaks the language of luxury. However, if there’s any city that knows how to preserve its history while providing modern amenities, it’s New York. The final result is a beautifully updated home that pays homage to its honorable past.

Take a look inside this historic home, here

Featured Story

City Living, Features, real estate trends, Upper East Side

Upper East Side

The Upper East Side isn’t just for your grandparents anymore. Photo by Ed Yourdon cc

There’s been so much talk lately about how the Upper East Side is the next cool ‘hood–this guy even says it’s cooler than Brooklyn–and while that may be true (the neighborhood’s got a Meatball Shop; is there really any use denying it anymore?), we have our sights set slightly farther north.

The high 80’s and 90’s, clustered between Park and 1st Avenues, is a hot spot for young professionals who are looking for little more culture and a little less of the bro-tastic bar scene, as well as for just-starting-out families who want a community feel, but not the sky-high rents of Park Avenue and Museum Mile. A slew of new residential developments are popping up in the area, as are fun, independent restaurants and bars. And this piece of Manhattan offers almost just the same transportation convenience as the Upper East Side proper, but with lower rents and a calmer feel.

More on the new Upper East Side

Cool Listings, Flatiron, Interiors, Union Square

17 East 17th Street, apartment with rooftop pool, floating glass staircase, renovated historic landmark building

Apparently, even 1,500 square feet of mesmerizing outdoor space isn’t enough to get renters to pay the $40,000-per-month asking price for this Union Square penthouse at 17 East 17th Street. The unique home has had a pretty rocky history during its last few years on the rental market, and it appears to still be searching for a temporary dweller nearly a year after it last became available. As stunning as this 4,000-square-foot triplex is—and it’s a stunner—there’s one interesting choice that might make apartment hunters take pause. You’ll see what we’re talking about after the break.

See what’s inside, here

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