Manhattan

affordable housing, housing lotteries, Manhattan, Union Square

Courtesy of NYC Department of Housing Preservation & Development

Here’s an opportunity to live in a luxury Manhattan rental at a discount. A housing lottery launched this month for a dozen middle-income units at One Union Square South, a Related Companies-developed building most recognizable for the massive electronic clock art piece on its facade. While it’s hard to call this lottery affordable, the available apartments do offer significant savings compared to the building’s market-rate units. New Yorkers earning 130 percent of the area median income can apply for the apartments, which include $2,523/month studios, $2,700/month one-bedrooms, and $3,235/month two-bedrooms.

Find out if you qualify

Architecture, Hotels, Midtown East

Rendering courtesy of Waldorf Astoria New York

It’s been four years since the Waldorf Astoria closed its doors for a restoration and reimagination that will bring 375 luxury condos to the storied landmark. And since then, the team has been teasing out renderings of what we can expect when the Waldorf finally reopens in early 2023. The latest is a look at the Grand Ballroom, one of the largest in NYC (it can accommodate more than 1,000 people) that’s hosted the likes of JFK, Queen Elizabeth II, and Grace Kelly. The Art Deco space is an interior landmark, and the restoration will return it to its 1931 splendor.

More details and views here

Cool Listings, Flatiron

Photos by Travis Mark for Sotheby’s International Realty

Sure, this three-bedroom Flatiron co-op checks all the boxes of a downtown loft–sprawling footprint (7,100 square feet to be exact), high ceilings, 32 oversized windows, a cool mezzanine setup–but its artistic pedigree is what’s really unique. Located at 20 East 20th Street, the home was converted in 1977 by influential artists Gordon Matta-Clark and Les Levine, and it was at one time home to both Anselm Keifer and Julian Schnabel, the latter of whom also used the space as his studio. It’s now on the market for $9,995,000.

Look around

Featured Story

Features, Greenwich Village, History

“Mourners from the Ladies Waist and Dressmakers Union Local 25 and the United Hebrew Trades of New York march in the streets after the Triangle fire” 1911. Reproduction. The National Archives, via Wikimedia Commons

Around 4:30 p.m. on March 25, 1911, a fire broke out on the eighth floor of the Asch Building at Washington Place and Greene Streets, just as the young employees of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory, who occupied the building’s top three floors, were preparing to leave for the day. The Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire killed 146 people, nearly all of them Jewish and Italian immigrant women and girls who toiled in the city’s garment industry. Triangle stood out as the deadliest workplace tragedy in New York City before 9/11. It served as a bellwether in the American labor movement, galvanizing Americans in all walks of life to join the fight for industrial reform. It also highlighted the extraordinary grit and bravery of the women workers and reformers – members of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union, and the Women’s Trade Union League – who fought and died for fairer and safer working conditions in New York and around the country.

Find out the whole history

Midtown West, Urban Design

All photos courtesy of NY State Parks on Flickr

A former New York City Police Department tow-pound on the Hudson River will open as a public park this summer, more than 20 years after the state designated the lot as future open space. Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Wednesday said work at Pier 76 has already begun, with an expected opening date as early as June 1. The plan for the 5.6-acre park aligns with the governor’s ambitious $51 billion redevelopment of over 100 acres of Midtown West, announced earlier this year.

Find out more

Cool Listings, Upper East Side

Listing images courtesy of Douglas Elliman

This Upper East Side one-bedroom may be small, but there’s something unique to see almost everywhere you look–a wall of built-in shelving with a rolling library ladder, beamed ceilings, exposed brick walls, and a creatively compact kitchen. Located at 334 East 77th Street, the co-op is asking $550,000.

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Cool Listings, Gramercy Park

Listing photos by Vistabee

The historic St. George’s Episcopal Church is located on the west side of equally historic Stuyvesant Square Park. Around the corner at 205 East 16th Street, the former parish house was built in 1888 and converted in 2005 to a boutique condominium known as The Abbey. The homes are incredibly unique, including this top-floor duplex that just hit the market for $2 million. It underwent a recent gut renovation that features vaulted ceilings with skylights, exposed steel beams, a custom-built aluminum staircase, and a roof terrace.

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Central Park South, Cool Listings

Listing photos by Heidi Solander for Sotheby’s International Realty

The Osborne co-op was built on the northwest corner of 57th Street and 7th Avenue in 1885 as one of NYC’s first grand apartment buildings. Just four years later, Carnegie Hall would rise across the street, cementing its stature among the city’s elite addresses. A two-bedroom apartment in the building has hit the market for $3,500,000, and just by looking at its opulence, one feels transported back to the 19th century. From the imposing coffered ceilings and stately columns to the decadent fabrics and gilded decor, the home offers an old-world sophistication not often found anymore.

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Celebrities, Chelsea, Cool Listings

Listing images courtesy of The Corcoran Group

Just listed for $15,995,000, this Chelsea townhouse at 328 West 23rd Street will have you drooling from the first look. In addition to the decadent decor and architecture, the home has three large balconies, a full-length roof terrace, and a large garden complete with a hot tub. It also has a very cool 1,000-bottle wine cellar that even has a dumbwaiter to move the wine to the level above. The bragging rights don’t stop here, though. The house was built in the 1850s and later served as a convent for the “Sisters of Saint Agnes,” a charitable order, and when visiting New York, Mother Teresa stayed here.

Take the full tour

Cool Listings, Upper West Side 

Listing photos courtesy of The Corcoran Group

Between the fabrics and the wallpapers, there’s a playful pattern almost everywhere you look at this Upper West Side condo. Located at 2112 Broadway, the historic Apple Bank Building, the two-bedroom home keeps the fun coming with mid-century decor, industrial French doors, and a 100-square-foot vented laundry room. The home is currently on the market for $3,500,000.

Have a look

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