Manhattan

Featured Story

Features, Greenwich Village, GVSHP, History

The oldest house in the Village? It’s not what you think

By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, Thu, September 13, 2018

The Village is known as one of the oldest parts of New York City, where historic architecture can be found everywhere, and charming houses from a bygone era still stand. Here at the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, a perennial question we’re asked is “which is the oldest house in the Village?” It’s a great question, with a complicated answer. Is it one of the two charming wooden houses? The “brick” house with connections to Paul Revere? The Merchant’s House Museum, Manhattan’s first individual landmark? The handsome Stuyvesant Street house built by Peter Stuyvesant’s great-grandson?

The answer might surprise you

affordable housing, housing lotteries, Stuy Town

Via StuyTown Property Services

A lottery launched this week for newly available apartments at Stuyvesant Town and Peter Cooper Village in the East Village. New Yorkers earning 80 and 165 percent of the area median income (or between $43,860 and $268,620 annually) can apply for the available units, which range from $1,462/month studios to $5,508/month five-bedrooms. As Manhattan’s largest rental community, StuyTown includes a 24-hour on-site property manager, laundry, a cafe, children’s playroom, a fitness center and shared outdoor space across 80 acres.

Find out if you qualify

Design, hudson yards

Hudson Yards’ second-tallest tower reveals new looks

By Devin Gannon, Thu, September 13, 2018

35 Hudson Yards, Hudson Yards, SOM

Rendering via Binyan Studios

A fresh set of renderings was revealed Wednesday of 35 Hudson Yards, the tallest residential tower in the rapidly developing Manhattan neighborhood. David Childs of Skidmore Owings & Merrill (SOM) designed the 92-story supertall, which topped out at 1,009 feet in June. The limestone and glass tower will contain 143 condos, 22,000 square feet of private amenities, and an Equinox club, spa, and 200-room hotel. Following 1,296-foot-tall 30 Hudson Yards, which topped out in July, neighboring 35 Hudson Yards is the second-tallest tower at the site.

Take a peek

Chelsea, Starchitecture

Via WeWork/WeGrow

WeWork opened its first elementary school in Chelsea last week, equipped with modular classrooms, tree houses and giant floor cushions, dezeen reported Wednesday. Bjarke Ingels was tapped last year to design the WeGrow school on West 18th Street, designated for children ages three to nine, with a focus on education through play and interaction. New photos from the co-working company reveal open-plan classrooms with multi-functional furniture and lots of natural light.

Take a tour

Featured Story

Features, Restaurants, Upper West Side , Where I Work

440 Amsterdam Avenue, Orwasher's NYC, Orwasher's Bakery, Orwasher's Upper West Side

There’s a good chance that if you’ve walked into one of Orwasher’s Bakery‘s Manhattan storefronts over the past decade you’ve assumed the 102-year-old business is still family owned. But the original Orwasher family sold it in 2007 to Keith Cohen. The likely confusion comes from Cohen’s dedication to maintaining the mom-and-pop feel of his Upper East and West Side locations, along with the vintage recipes for New York staples such as rye bread, challah, and sourdough. But he’s also used his business smarts to make some well-received updates, including a major expansion of the wholesale business, a new line of wine breads in collaboration with Long Island-based vineyard Channing Daughters, a formula for the perfect baguette (he even traveled to Paris to learn the art!), and, perhaps most impressively, the addition of the elusive New York bagel.

6sqft recently visited Cohen at the two-year-old Upper West Side location to learn a bit more about his journey as master baker and proprietor of one of NYC’s most beloved old-school businesses and get a behind-the-scenes look at where the magic happens.

Start carbo-loading

condos, Major Developments, New Developments, Rentals, Starchitecture, Upper West Side 

3 Waterline Square, Rafael Vinoly,

Image courtesy of CityRealty.

Catching up with the rise of Waterline Square has been a pastime of skyline watchers since the project was announced. Now, CityRealty shares a recent Instagram post by designer Rafael Viñoly revealing the newly-installed final piece of the façade at Three Waterline Square, completing its multi-faceted crystal-planed exterior. On the inside, Three Waterline Square’s carefully expressed corners and gently sloping walls allow stunning panoramic river, park, and skyline views.

New images and video this way

City Living, Midtown

Pay to break stuff for fun at these ‘rage rooms’ in NYC

By Devin Gannon, Tue, September 11, 2018

Some New Yorkers in need of major stress relief are skipping meditation and trying an unusual, but apparently effective, alternative. As a self-described provider of destruction services, the Rage Cage lets visitors smash printers, VCRs, dishes, and other items with a sledgehammer or baseball bat. Sessions range from $45 for 25 minutes of raging to a $120 30-minute session for four people (h/t WSJ).

More breaking news ahead

Art, Midtown East

New Midtown mural honors 9/11 firefighter

By Dana Schulz, Tue, September 11, 2018

Photo © 6sqft

The number of first responders who deserve to be honored for their courageous efforts after the September 11th attacks is many, but a new Midtown mural of one particular firefighter serves as a symbolic honor to all of those brave men and women. The Post first reported on the mural by Brazilian artist Eduardo Kobra, painted on eight-stories of a building on East 49th Street and Third Avenue. The image replicates a photo of FDNY member Mike Bellantoni “overcome with exhaustion and despair” on 9/11, originally taken by Post freelance photographer Matthew McDermott.

What did Bellantoni think of the photo?

affordable housing, Upper East Side

Google Street View of the Holmes Towers

The federal government ranked three Upper East Side public housing buildings as some of the worst in the United States, the New York Post reported Monday. The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) gave the Holmes Towers, the Isaacs Houses and Robbins Plaza just 25 points out of a maximum of 100 as a measure of quality following recent inspections. Out of the more than 3,800 scores counted by HUD last year, the three complexes tied for 13th worst in the country.

More here

Featured Story

Features, Financial District, real estate trends, Top Stories

One world trade center, skyscrapers, tall towers, supertalls

Image courtesy of Michael Vadon’s Flickr

In 2010, Lower Manhattan was still deeply scarred by the attacks of 9-11. With much of the neighborhood under construction, a high vacancy rate, and few full-time residents, walking around the area, especially outside business hours, often felt like walking through a ghost town. It was, in many respects, a neighborhood in waiting.

Since 2011, which marked the opening of the 9/11 Memorial—and the symbolic end of the neighborhood’s long period of recovery from the 9/11 attacks—Lower Manhattan has undergone a transformation that is difficult to ignore. New businesses have opened, new residential developments have launched, the vacancy rate has drastically declined, and in many respects, an entirely new neighborhood has taken shape.

The dawn of a new Downtown

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