Manhattan

Chelsea, Cool Listings

408 West 20th Street, Chelsea, Townhouses, Seinfeld, Elaine Benes

Listing images by Yoo Jean Han; courtesy of Sotheby’s International Realty

Seinfeld fans may recognize the exterior of this townhouse at 408 West 20th Street as the home of character Elaine Benes, though current owners Harry Azorin and Lori Monson, who bought the home for $950,000 in 1995, don’t get many questions about it anymore. “Maybe twice a month, someone would walk by, and they’d say, ‘Is this Elaine’s house?’…I’d say, about 10 years ago, it stopped,” Monson told the Wall Street Journal. Originally built in 1839, the residence is now on the market for $8.65 million. Even though Seinfeld was largely set on the Upper West Side, the house is actually located “on the most desirable street in Chelsea,” as the listing boasts, “perfectly positioned” on historic Cushman Row and overlooking the General Theological Seminary.

Get the full tour

Architecture, History, Midtown, Midtown East

View looking north, with Central Park and the towers that dot Billionaires’ Row clearly visible; Photo courtesy of Empire State Realty Trust

After four years and $165 million, the revamp of New York City’s first supertall is nearly complete, bringing a more contemporary and visitor-friendly experience to one of the world’s most historic buildings. The Empire State Building’s 102nd-floor observatory, which boasts 360-degree panoramic views at 1,250 feet above street level, officially opens to the public on Saturday, Oct. 12. Building owner Empire State Realty Trust redesigned the observatory to be less obstructive for guests, allowing more picture-perfect views and less time waiting.

All the way up

Cool Listings, Upper West Side 

The Dorilton, 171 West 71st Street, upper west side,

Images courtesy of Douglas Elliman.

The gated side street entrance at the 12-story pre-war Dorilton at 171 West 71st Street on the Upper West Side is considered to be among the grandest in New York. The building, an official city landmark since the 1970s, has undergone a careful restoration that has brought its intricate façade and rich interior spaces back to their original Edwardian splendor; intricate wood molding, wainscoting and marble mantles can still be found in many apartments. This classic style gets an upgrade with modern good looks and comfort in this gracious two (with potential for more) bedroom unit. Starting with the fireplace and stained glass bay windows in the entrance foyer, the apartment radiates elegance and charm. Add a large landscaped terrace, and its $1.925 million ask seems like quite a bargain.

Check out this gorgeous Upper West Side home

Landscape Architecture, Lower East Side, Policy, Urban Design

Coastal Resiliency, NYC flooding, DDC

Preliminary design of Corlears shared use path; via DDC.

Borough President Gale A. Brewer and Council Member Carlina Rivera announced Thursday the completed report by independent consulting firm Deltares on the East Side Coastal Resiliency Project (ESCR). As 6sqft previously reported, the project was first developed in the wake of Hurricane Sandy and is intended to protect 2.2 miles of Manhattan’s East Side, between East 25th Street and Montgomery Street, from flooding and improve access to waterfront space. According to the city, the ESCR project would protect over 110,000 New Yorkers in the area.

Find out more and read the report

Central Park South, Recent Sales

220 Central Park SOuth, Vornado, Robert A.M., Stern

Via Vornado Realty Trust and Robert A.M. Stern Architects

Billionaire Ken Griffin really likes 220 Central Park South. The hedge fund mogul picked up two more apartments at the Robert A.M. Stern-designed skyscraper last month, less than a year after he bought a record-breaking $240 million penthouse there. The New York Post first spotted the sales, which includes apartments 20H for $1.89 million and 20J for $2.06 million, bringing his total investments at the property to roughly $244 million.

And another one

Major Developments, Rentals, Upper West Side 

waterline square, upper west side

Rendering courtesy of Noe & Associates with The Boundary

Update 10/10/19: More details about Waterline Square rentals were released on Tuesday, following the official lease launch last month. At the three-tower Upper West Side development, studios start at $3,938/month, one-bedrooms at $5,425/month, two-bedrooms at $8,625/month, three-bedrooms at $9,933/month, and four-bedrooms at $15,000/month. These prices include concessions for three months of free rent on a 12-month lease. Currently, the priciest unit available to rent is a $19,208/month four-bedroom at One Waterline Square, which measures just over 2,200 square feet.

After topping out nearly two years ago, the trio of glassy high-rise towers known as Waterline Square on Monday kicked off leasing for its rental units. GID Development tapped three major architects, Richard Meier, Kohn Pedersen Fox (KPF), and Rafael Viñoly, to design the Upper West Side buildings, which include roughly 260 condos, 800 rental units, and 100,000 square feet of amenities. Rentals, ranging from studios to four-bedroom apartments, start at $4,130 per month, without concessions. Hill West Architects serve as the project’s architect of record.

Get the details

Cool Listings, Greenwich Village

77 Bleecker Street, Bleecker Court, Greenwich Village, co-ops, cool listings

Image courtesy of Douglas Elliman.

Bleecker Court at 77 Bleecker Street in the Village/Noho is mid-20th-century modernist in appearance, but it’s a neighborhood classic. This “loft” apartment has benefitted from a recent gut renovation and, asking $650,000, is 21st-century-ready. The home’s designer/owner created a magazine-worthy interior within the open, airy space, making the best of high ceilings and a wall of windows overlooking Mercer Street.

Look both ways

Featured Story

Features, History, yorkville

The hopping history of German breweries in Yorkville

By Lucie Levine, Thu, October 10, 2019

Jacob Ruppert’s Knickerbocker Beer, 1912, via Library of Congress, Geography and Map Division

If you spent the first weekend of October hoisting lager and Oomph-ing it up for Oktoberfest, then you joined a long and proud tradition of German beer production and consumption in New York City. In fact, New York’s German-owned breweries were once the largest beer-making operations in the country, and the brewers themselves grew into regional and national power-players, transforming Major League Baseball, holding elected office, and, perhaps most importantly, sponsoring goat beauty pageants in Central Park. While brewing flourished in both Manhattan and Brooklyn throughout the 19th century, the city’s largest breweries were clustered in Yorkville. In fact, much of the neighborhood’s storied German cultural history can be traced to the rise of brewing in the area, and the German-language shops, cultural institutions and social halls that sprang up to cater to the brewery workers.

Get more Hopping History Here!

Cool Listings, Tribeca

$1.75M Tribeca loft was once the Engine 29 firehouse

By Michelle Cohen, Wed, October 9, 2019

Engine 29 Firehouse, 160 Chambers Street, cool listings, tribeca, firehouse

Images courtesy of Douglas Elliman

This 1,500-square-foot classic loft co-op, asking $1.75 million, is in a neighborhood filled with lofts. What makes this Tribeca home at 160 Chambers Street a bit different is its former life as the Engine 29 firehouse. Loft lovers will be happy to note that though it has been recently renovated, 12-foot tin ceilings, exposed brick walls, hardwood floors and oversized windows remain. Currently a walk-up, the coop plans to install an elevator.

Get an inside view of this historic space

Construction Update, Hudson Square

st. john's terminal, cookfox, oxford properties group

Rendering of 550 Washington Street via COOKFOX

Construction has officially kicked off at Google’s massive new campus in Hudson Square. The tech company plans to open office space across three properties 315 Hudson Street, 345 Hudson Street, and 550 Washington Street, which formerly served as a freight terminal. The project involves a gut renovation of the terminal building and an addition of eight new floors. As CityRealty reported Tuesday, the northern sections of the St. John’s Terminal building are now demolished.

Get the details

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