Interviews

Art, Book Reviews, Interviews

Images courtesy of Running Press

While New York City is home to some of the best and biggest cultural institutions in the world, it’s the more obscure masterpieces found on streets, subway stations, and tucked away in bars and buildings that inspired author Lori Zimmer’s latest book. In Art Hiding in New York: An Illustrated Guide to the City’s Secret MasterpiecesZimmer highlights 100 hidden-in-plain-sight and surprising spots across the city and explores the unique history of the art and the artists behind them. From a massive Roy Lichtenstein mural in the Times Square subway station to fragments of the Berlin Wall painted by artist Thierry Noir, incredible pieces of art can be found everywhere in New York, even beyond galleries and museums. Ahead, we chat with Zimmer about her guide to New York City’s underground art world, the beautiful illustrations paired with each work, and the city’s perpetual reinvention.

Learn more and meet the author

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Architecture, condos, Features, Interviews, New Developments, Upper West Side 

Images courtesy of CetraRuddy

Designed by CetraRuddy and RKTB Architects, Dahlia at 212 West 95th Street celebrates the Upper West Side‘s classic residential blocks of pre-war architecture while adding innovative design elements. The condo’s 38 homes and common areas are designed to be more spacious than the average Manhattan apartment, and perks unheard of in New York City include a huge 5,100-square-foot private elevated park, a fitness center with a yoga room, and a private parking garage. Plus, each apartment is situated on a corner of the building, so there’s no shortage of views and natural light. 6sqft recently offered a peek at the 20-story building’s interiors, and we’ve now chatted with architect John Cetra about this new addition to the Upper West Side, the neighborhood, and how apartment building design must be sensitive to changing times and the idea of home in the city.

An interview with John Cetra of CetraRuddy, this way

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Design, Features, Interviews

A prototype of D-Tec 1 clinic courtesy of SG Blocks

As the country enters the fourth month of fighting the coronavirus pandemic, public health experts and officials say the best way to keep the virus under control is expansive diagnostic testing. Harvard research group Global Health Institute says states should greatly ramp up testing to contain the spread of COVID-19, to at least 900,000 tests per day; currently, the U.S. is testing about 500,000 people per day. Paul Galvin realized his company, SG Blocks, which repurposes shipping containers for a variety of uses, could meet this crisis head-on. The Brooklyn-based construction organization has designed a new product line of medical pop-up clinics and COVID-19 testing facilities that are affordable, eco-friendly, and can be constructed just about anywhere.

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Architecture, Features, Interviews, Landscape Architecture, Lower East Side

Rendering courtesy of Extell

The coronavirus pandemic–which forced New Yorkers to shelter in place and adhere to social distancing rules–has many apartment dwellers longing for private outdoor space. While a lot of us would be content with a balcony or rooftop access, Extell, the developer behind One Manhattan Square, has taken the idea of residential outdoor space to the next level. At the Lower East Side condo tower, residents have access to 45,000 square feet of green space designed by landscape architecture firm West 8. Considered to be one of the largest private gardens in the city, the East River-facing green space is uniquely located on an incline and contains several distinct areas designed for active and passive use. Ahead, hear from the team at West 8 on creating an urban oasis in one of the city’s busiest neighborhoods as well as the many perks of the space, including an adult treehouse, tea pavilion, star-gazing observatory, and more.

Hear from the architects

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Architecture, condos, Features, Interviews, New Developments, Nomad

Renderings by The Neighbourhood, courtesy of Morris Adjmi Architects

Among the recent architectural contributions to New York City designed by Morris Adjmi Architects, a tall, slender tower at 30 East 31st Street from developers EDG and The Pinnacle Group is quietly turning heads in the northern part of the Manhattan neighborhood known as Nomad. The 479-foot-high, 42-unit condominium tower, officially named 30E31, is now ready for occupancy. 6sqft caught up with architect and designer Morris Adjmi to get the creator’s viewpoint on the notable new Manhattan residence, from his thoughts on the relatively new neighborhood to his contextual exterior design and custom interiors.

The full interview with Morris Adjmi, this way

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Features, Interviews, Sunset Park, Where I Work

Photo courtesy of Course of Trade

As of this week, Industry City-based nonprofit workforce development organization Course of Trade has produced 219,279 hand-sewn isolation gowns for New York City hospitals, with an ultimate contract of 520,800 from the New York City Economic Development Corporation. Course of Trade was started by Malia Mills’ production director Libby Mattern to offer free sewing instruction and job placement assistance in the garment industry. When COVID hit the city, Libby knew it was time to innovate yet again, and she put in place a partnership with the city in which a 300-person team across South Brooklyn is sewing these life-saving gowns.

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Features, Interviews, Sunset Park, Where I Work

Jack holds a box of face shields ready to be delivered

When the Mayor and the Governor spoke out about the city’s dire need for PPE, many hero companies stepped up to the plate, including Industry City’s iMakr, an outpost of the world’s largest 3D-printing and 3D-scanning store. They knew they had enough equipment and the know-how to create simple but much-needed face shields, and so their three-man team in Brooklyn immediately got to work. To date, they’ve distributed more than 5,000 face shields to more than 20 local hospitals. Ahead, we chat with Jack Keum, iMakr’s business manager, to learn more about the company’s mission to help our frontline workers through this crisis.

Hear from Jack

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City Living, Features, Interviews, People

Photos courtesy of Invisible Hands

If you needed more evidence that New Yorkers come together in a time of crisis, look no further than Invisible Hands. The premise of the volunteer group is that low-risk people can help to bring groceries and supplies to those in demographics at high risk for COVID-19. Simone, Liam, and Healy — “healthy 20-somethings in NYC” — started the group just nine days ago, and today have amassed 7,000 volunteers across New York City and parts of Jersey City. Yesterday, we spoke with Liam Elkind about what it’s been like starting this incredible group, how New Yorkers have been able to “pull together when it feels like the world is trying to pull us apart,” and what Invisible Hands hopes for the future.

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Central Park South, Features, Interviews, Restaurants, Where I Work

When Sheldon “Shelly” Fireman opened Redeye Grill across from Carnegie Hall 25 years ago, the term “restauranteur” didn’t exist. But by that point, he’d already gained local celebrity status for Greenwich Village’s all-night Hip Bagel and had the foresight to open Cafe Fiorello near recently completed Lincoln Center. Today, Shelly is the CEO of Fireman Hospitality Group, which operates six restaurants in NYC as well as two on the Potomac River in Maryland. And though he can most definitely be called a restauranteur now, Shelly stands out amongst the myriad food influencers in the city. Though his establishments exude an old-school New York charm and certain nostalgia, he has found the formula to withstand the test of time.

After a 2018 kitchen fire, the iconic Redeye Grill reopened in July. We recently sat down to lunch with Shelly to hear more about his story and take a tour of this classic Midtown restaurant.

Have a look around and meet Shelly

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Architecture, Features, Interviews, New Jersey, real estate trends

Photo of Asbury Park’s Convention Hall by Acroterion / Wikimedia Commons

If you lived along the Jersey Shore in the ’80s and ’90s, Asbury Park was not a place you went. After getting its start in the late 1800s as a summer escape for wealthy residents of NYC and Philly, the 1.6-square-mile town boomed again in the ’50s and ’60s as a grungey, artsy hangout. But after the race riots in the 1970s, the town fell into disrepair and was forgotten by local stakeholders. Fast forward to today, and Asbury is booming–we once aptly described it as “Williamsburg meets Bruce Springsteen-land meets Venice Beach.”

Like many gentrifying/revitalized areas, the change can be attributed to a developer with foresight. In this case, the team at iStar realized the opportunity nine years ago. They now own 35 acres of land in Asbury, including 70 percent of the waterfront, and are investing more than $1 billion in the town. Their projects include the luxury condo Monroe, the renovated Asbury Lanes bowling alley/performance venue, The Asbury Hotel, and, most recently, the Asbury Ocean Club, a hotel-condo hybrid that made headlines for its $1,050/night suite. Unsurprisingly, iStar has received its share of criticism, but that hasn’t stopped New Yorkers from flooding the seaside city in the summertime. Ahead, we delve into the social and cultural landscape of Asbury and talk with iStar’s Brian Cheripka about the lesser-known politics behind their plans, why they decided to invest in Asbury Park, and what we can expect to see in the future.

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