infographic

City Living, infographic, real estate trends

NYC Will Get Richer and Denser, New Report Reveals

By Dana Schulz, Fri, March 27, 2015

Bethesda Fountain Bethesda Fountain – Central Park via photopin (license)

Think New York City is crowded now? You ain’t seen nothing yet. According to census data and a new report by the Brookings Institute on job proximity, the city is on track for a population boom of professionals raking in big bucks. The city has by far the highest job density in the country, even when the national trend is for both people and jobs to move to the suburbs. Similarly, NYC tops the list of increase in population of college grads between 2007 and 2012 by a landslide. And as The Atlantic observes, this combination is creating a feedback loop that will make our already rich and crowded city even richer and more crowded. “The densest cities tend to be the most educated cities, which are also the richest cities, and often the biggest cities. They’re gobbling up a disproportionate share of college grads. And, as a result, they are becoming richer, denser, and more educated.”

More details ahead

City Living, infographic

Are You Considered ‘Middle Class’ in NYC?

By Diane Pham, Tue, March 24, 2015

cobble hill

Image via 6sqft flickr

Following up on our recent post taking a look at how much you need to earn to be considered “rich” where you live, here’s a brand new study by Quoctrung Bui of NPR’s Planet Money which investigates what’s considered “middle class” in the United States. Although most Americans would humbly identify themselves as median earners, whether they’re raking in $30K or $300K, there are actually benchmarks for this segment of the population. But as you may have guessed, they vary greatly depending on where you live.

Find out where you stack up here

Architecture, infographic

The History of Height, Skyscraper Museum, supertalls

The latest addition to the Skyscraper Museum‘s permanent collection is “The History of Height,” an interactive timeline of the tallest buildings throughout history. The web tool is made up of a scrollable stream of flashcards starting as far back as the Great Pyramid in 2650 BCE and continuing all the way to today’s tallest, the Burj Khalifa. It also offers information about the innovations that allowed people to build higher, like fireproof floors, zoning laws, elevators, and high-strength bolting, and includes towers that have long since been demolished, but had an impact on the supertall environment.

More on the interactive infographic here

Architecture, History, infographic

25 Epic Buildings That Were Never Constructed

By Diane Pham, Tue, March 17, 2015

antoni gaudi nyc, the unbuilt gaudi, unbuilt gaudi in nyc,lost gaudi design,, Hotel Attraction gaudi, Hotel Attraction gaudi nyc, Hotel Attraction new york, hotel atraccion gaudi

While we all love to ogle the latest and greatest rendering reveals, it’s a shame how quickly we forget about the incredible architecture that could have risen once their plans get scrapped. To give a small consolation to the architects who spent countless hours and sleepless nights scribbling skyscrapers with the hope of transforming the built landscape, Rubberbond has created a nifty infographic showing 25 ambitious projects that today, for better or worse, only live on in drawings. From a pyramid-shaped mausoleum in London designed to hold five million corpses to a Sagrada Familia-like hotel Gaudí fashioned for NYC to a giant Bucky dome that could have covered Manhattan, have a look at all the lost designs ahead and then weigh in—was it a good idea these were dumped or would they have been great architectural additions?

See the whole thing here

History, infographic, real estate trends

worlds tallest buildings, tallest buildings in usa, tallest buildings in europe, tallest buildings in asia, tallest buildings in north america

From the pyramids of Teotihuacan to One World Trade, here are the tallest buildings of the last 5,000 years.

Slovakian artist and designer Martin Vargic created six infographics that chart the history of buildings across Europe, North America, Asia, Africa, South America and Oceania. The infographics, which date buildings (and a few notable monuments) as far back as 2,650 B.C., give a pretty complete look, highlighting the construction’s name, shape, height (which does account for a tower’s spire), the year it was erected, and the years it was its continent’s, if not the world’s (denoted by a red shading), tallest building. The charts also give a good snapshot of the great skyscraper race that took hold in the early 20th century, as well as shifts in global money as seen in the emergence of Asian skyscrapers like Taipei 101 and the Burj Khalifa in the mid-2000s. You can get a closer look by expanding the image ahead.

This way for the complete picture

infographic, Major Developments

world's most expensive buildings, nyc's most expensive buildings

Don’t share this with Michael Kimmelman. The New York Times architecture critic who this past Sunday blasted the design of One World Trade for its excess will only find more fuel for his fire with this infographic visualizing the world’s most expensive buildings. The recently opened One WTC is not only the world’s priciest construction, but it outdoes its runners-up, Las Vegas’s Palazzo and London’s Shard, by a staggering two billion dollars. The Emporis infograph was first uncovered by Chicago Tribune critic Blair Kamin, who tweeted the chart to supplement his own review in the Windy City paper.

infographic, Manhattan, Neighborhoods, People

manhattan stereotypes, manhattan cliches, nyc stereotypes, nyc cliches, manhattan real estate, nyc neighborhood stereotypes, average new yorker, new york rents

Every NYC neighborhood has its archetype, and this infographic by Apartment List perfectly depicts every Manhattan nabe to a tee.

While you’ll of course find the obvious characterizations like the Goldman Sachs associate who galavants around the Upper East Side, hilarious insights like what Chelsea residents do for fun (“People watching at the High Line, eating a popsicle”) will give you a giggle. The infographic also provides useful info like the average cost of one- and two-bedroom apartments, as well as how much cash you can save by sharing — all in terms any New Yorker can understand (ex. in Tribeca you can pocket $1,548/month; a.k.a. 19 pairs of Lullemon pants). And though Apartment List’s creation just depicts Manhattan ‘hoods right now, given the easy target that lies just across the East River, we’re keeping our eyes peeled for their take on Brooklyn.

Check out the full-size version here

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