infographic

Art, infographic

Underwater New York, Atlas Obscura, Quester I, Submarine, Coney Island Bay, Arthur Kill, Underwater Finds, Frying Pan, Nicki Pombier Berger

The collectors of curious things at Atlas Obscura bring us the work of Underwater New York, a fascinating catalogue of all the weird stuff that’s been found bobbing, sinking or washed-up from the murky depths of the city’s waterways, from a giraffe skeleton to a grand piano, with a bag of lottery tickets thrown in for good measure. In a fascinating study in what-is-it-and-where-is-it-coming from, founder Nicki Pombier Berger and the site’s editors and contributors (artists, filmmakers, musicians, photographers and other storytellers) create contexts for the curiosities that find their way to this aquatic lost and found.

New York City waterways, like the swampy southern Brooklyn beach known as Dead Horse Bay, and their submerged treasures are the inspiration for works in this digital gallery of sorts. Berger and fellow editors Helen Georgas and Nicole Haroutunian compile a growing list (it currently contains 150 objects) of waterfront finds that they’ve discovered via everything from news articles to anecdotes. Contributors are encouraged to use the objects to weave their stories in whatever medium they choose.

Find out more of the bizarre items found beneath the waves

Art, infographic, Policy, real estate trends

SITU, Storefront for Art and Architecture, Property Taxes, Section 581, Sharing Models: Manhattanisms, Billionaire's Row, Taxes

“Section 581” by SITU Studio, Photograph by Patrick Mandeville

Billionaires get off nearly tax-free and billions go uncollected due to flaws in the way the city assesses property value. As part of a new exhibit at the Storefront for Art and Architecture in Soho, interdisciplinary architecture firm SITU Studio created visual representations of these inequities in one of their most glaring examples: the buildings along Central Park.

New York City’s property tax structure assigns higher real property taxes to renters than it does to the infamous absentee owners of the trophy condos on Billionaires’ Row, short-changing the city of millions in annual revenue, according to CityLab. The acrylic bands in the SITU models show the disparity between the taxed value of these properties and the sky-high amounts they’d actually sell for.

Find out how the state law is giving billionaires a free lunch

City Living, Design, infographic, Products

Easily put a name to New York’s discarded paraphernalia and putrid odors with the help of the Periodic Table of NYC Trash. This nifty design, created by writer Molly Young and graphic designer Teddy Blanks, places 118 recurring New York City elements into a handy tabular array that, like the real periodic table that inspired it, provides a useful framework for analyzing behavior (in this case, that of New Yorkers).

All of the trash depicted in the poster was pulled straight off our city’s filthy streets and photographed by Young and Blanks. What’s featured includes everything from an innocuous Metro Card and stray baby sock to gag-inducing finds like a dead rat and a bottle of pee. Everything has also been handily divvied up into nine different categories that include apparel, beverage, food, hygiene, household, lifestyle, municipal, packing, and vices.

See the full size version here

infographic, maps

Puzzled at how many conversations about international issues turned to the subject of immigration no matter what the original context might have been, NYC-based entrepreneur and data visualization geek Max Galka created a map showing the flow of immigration to and from each of the world’s nations to better visualize where the patterns really lay.

In addition to topics like terrorism, Brexit, this year’s presidential race and the refugee crisis, according to Galka, immigration was “being mentioned in connection with all sorts of topics I never would have expected.” Finding that the debates on immigration, though sometimes heated, were lacking in factual information, he hopes that his mapping efforts, brought to us via his blog Metrocosm, can provide some real-world context on questions like, “how many migrants are there? Where are they coming from? And where are they going?”

Take a look at the map to see who’s coming and going

Architecture, infographic, New Developments

nyc buildings compared to world buildings

Gray silhouettes from left to right: Shanghai World Financial Center, CTF Finance Centre, One WTC, Lotte World Tower, Mecca Royal Clock Tower, Shanghai Tower, Burj Khalifa. Click link here to enlarge >>

As the Skyscraper Museum so aptly writes, “Tall and BIG are not the same thing.”

Echoing 6sqft’s recent post on global supertalls, the infographic above illustrates how when the height of New York’s tallest towers are stacked up against the sky-high constructions abroad (and 1 WTC), our city’s skyscrapers truly are “runts on the world’s stage.” The image also reveals that not only do these towers lack significantly in height, but also in girth. This means what really makes the design of all of New York’s new skyscrapers so unique is not how tall they are, but rather, how slender they are.

more on all that here

CityRealty, infographic, real estate trends

For the second quarter in a row, average condo sales prices in Manhattan are breaking records. The first three months of 2016 saw $4.59 billion in aggregate sales, breaking the previous record of $4.57 billion that was set last quarter, according to data from CityRealty. The average sales price topped out at $2.9 million, also significantly higher than last quarter’s $2.5 million. These figures aren’t surprising considering 24 percent of all condo sales during the beginning of this year were at or above $10 million, with new luxury developments like 432 Park Avenue, The Greenwich Lane, and 150 Charles Street accounting for the uptick.

More stats this way

Celebrities, CityRealty, infographic, real estate trends

nfl draft salaries

It’s no secret that the NFL’s top draft picks command starting salaries well into the eight-figure range, but to really put into perspective just how crazy-big their paychecks are, CityRealty‘s latest infographic takes a look at what the last five #1 picks could buy in Manhattan with their money. And on top of that, how these hypothetical one-off property purchases translate into real estate portfolios in their hometowns. (Teaser: Quarterback Jameis Winston could either buy a $24.95M pad at The Eldorado or 107 homes in his native Tampa, FL!)

Check out the full-size infographic here

City Living, infographic, Policy

The Association Between Income and Life Expectancy in the United States, 2001-2014, JAMA, Journal of the American Medical Association, Longevity, Income, Gap between rich and poor, geography and longevity, do new yorkers live longer

The Association Between Income and Life Expectancy in the United States, 2001-2014,” by the Journal of the American Medical Association; Life expectancy for all income quartiles.

The New York Times recently took a look at the results of a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). Using data compiled from anonymous earnings records and death certificates, the results offer some provocative insights into the importance of geography to how long people live–poor people in particular.

There is, as we’ve already assumed, a longevity gap between the rich (in this study, people with household incomes of over $100,000 per year) and poor (those with incomes less than $28,000). In Manhattan, for example, the average poor person will die about six years before the average rich one. But that gap is about a year and a half smaller than the same income/longevity gap for the United States as a whole. Tulsa and Detroit, for example, were two cities with the lowest levels of life expectancy among the low-income population, with the results already adjusted for differences based on race.

Find out what the numbers look like where you live

Featured Story

CityRealty, Features, holidays, infographic, real estate trends

ireland vs. nyc

Get out your green, because in honor of St. Patrick’s Day we’re putting a twist on the classic real estate comparison conundrum pinning some of the coolest Irish castles currently up for sale against a few New York castles (a.k.a. really expensive condos). Hit the jump to see what’s available in the $2 to $12 million range, and then cast a vote for whether you’d rather having a sprawling 700-year-old stone castle with 380 acres of land in Ireland, or a comfy four-bedroom penthouse at The Brompton in Yorkville. And if you’re not into castles or condos, we’ve also figured out how many pints of Guinness you can get for the median price of an apartment…

Which would you pick?

Featured Story

CityRealty, Features, infographic, Starchitecture

432 Park Avenue, DBOX, Macklowe Properties, Vinoly, Deborah Berke (52)

Closings at Macklowe Properties/CIM Group‘s Billionaires’ Row blockbuster 432 Park Avenue officially commenced just eight days into the new year, and now that enough time has gone by for these sales to be re-listed as rentals, CityRealty has put together an informative infographic that takes a look at the numbers at New York City’s tallest and most expensive residential building. There’s a lot of fun and fascinating info to be found ahead, but one of the most surprising facts? Of the 141 units available, only 13 have sold to date.

See the full infographic here

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