infographic

City Living, infographic, real estate trends

How much do amenities impact rent prices in NYC?

By Devin Gannon, Fri, April 7, 2017

When looking for that perfect city abode, apartment hunters often create a list of must-have amenities that also fit within a budget. Now, thanks to Priceonomics and Renthop, you can determine which apartment features have the greatest impact on the overall rent. While the number of bedrooms and bathrooms drive up rent prices the most, the research found that having a doorman, an elevator, available parking and/or laundry-in-building most likely would increase the total rent. In a closer look at NYC, the data shows having a doorman creates the biggest increase of rent in the city, adding about $260 each month.

Find out more

Design, infographic, Transportation

Like New York, Boston’s subway system is organized with a different color for each route. Unlike NYC, however, there’s no corresponding numbers, so the lines along the T are actually referred to by their respective hues. Which is why Boston resident Ari Ofsevit, a transportation engineering and urban planning graduate student at MIT, found it odd that the Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority didn’t use the same colors on their Twitter alerts as were found on their maps and signs. As Next City reported, this inspired him to create a graphic comparing the various colors of 13 major transit lines across the U.S. and Canada.

Find out more

City Living, infographic, Transportation

In light of NYC’s recent subway fare hike that bumped the price of a monthly pass to $121, the data jocks at ValuePenguin took a look at public transportation systems throughout the U.S. and ranked them according to affordability, based on the cost of a pass as a percentage of income and the median income of the city’s commuters. Among the findings: New York City’s transit system isn’t the most unaffordable; that honor goes to Los Angeles. Washington D.C. topped the most affordable list among large cities, followed by San Francisco and Boston.
Read on for more insight on the cost of a commute

infographic, real estate trends

We tend to think of New York as a hub for millennials living paycheck to paycheck, hindered by a higher-than-average cost of living coupled with their average yearly salary of $64,000. But young professionals are struggling throughout the nation. A new report detailed in the Washington Post looked at 25 major cities across the U.S. and found that in nearly half of these locales, “a millennial living alone in a one-bedroom apartment would need to spend more than 30 percent of his or her income on rent — surpassing the threshold for what financial experts say is affordable.” The solution, though, could be to get a roommate. Take New York, where millennials spend about 34 percent of their income on rent. By shacking up with a buddy, they can save $728 a month, or 14 percent of their income.

Read more

infographic, maps

Countries of origin for NYC’s refugees in 2002; map: DNAinfo

In the years since the 9/11 terror attacks, somewhere in the neighborhood of 8,000 people have sought refuge in New York City. Around 8,066 refugees have entered the United States through the city according to U.S. State Department Refugee Processing Center data. This week, President Donald Trump called for restrictions on entry to the U.S. for refugees and immigrants from the predominantly Muslim nations of Iran, Iraq, Somalia, Yemen, Sudan, Libya and Syria. A map of the world’s nations, courtesy of DNAinfo, shows the 59 countries from which New York City’s refugees have come each year since 2002.

Find out how many refugees have actually come to NYC from those countries

Architecture, infographic, maps

Given our growing obsession with skyscrapers–and our growing collection of them–we’re pleased to find that New York City has more skyscrapers than the next 10 skyscraper-boasting cities–combined. The infographic from highrises.com (h/t TRD) shows that NYC has 6,229 high-rise buildings, while Chicago has just 1,180, and second-most-populous Los Angeles a mere 518.

See how the cities stack up

Architecture, infographic

128 tall buildings were constructed in 2016, a world record

By Michelle Cohen, Tue, January 17, 2017

Tall Building Year in Review, Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat, CTBUH, supertalls, skyscrapers, 432 park avenue, warsaw spire, Ningbo, Bank of China, Guangzhou CTF, 432 Park Avenue

Click here to enlarge infographic

We’ve just been looking at the amazing growth of the skyscraper in its early years, and now ArchDaily informs us that 2016 was a record year for tall buildings throughout the world. The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) announced in its 2016 Tall Building Year in Review that 128 buildings 200 meters/656 feet or higher were completed in 2016, beating the previous year’s record of 114 completions. Of those buildings, 18 nabbed the spot of tallest building in their respective city, country or region; 10 were classified as supertalls (300 meters/984 feet or higher). And it looks like we’re on a roll…

Find out where the supertalls are rising and what the future might hold

City Living, infographic, Transportation

University of Minnesota, Transit Commute Rankings, Transit Study, Public Transportation, Transit, Cities, Jobs, Employment

A recent report from the University of Minnesota takes a look at major U.S. cities in terms of the number of jobs that are accessible to city residents via transit; Streetsblog brings us the news that you’ll find the best transit access to jobs in New York, San Francisco, Chicago, D.C., Los Angeles, Boston, Philadelphia, Seattle, San Jose and Denver. The study concludes that in those (top 10) cities, “accessibility ranks all exhibit a combination of high density land use and fast, frequent transit service.” According to the report, public transit is used for about five percent of commuting trips in the U.S., making it the second most widely used commute mode after driving. But the commute mode share accorded to transit varies quite a bit from city to city: 31 percent in the New York metropolitan area; 11 percent in Chicago; 8 percent in Seattle.

Find out more and compare cities

infographic, maps, Transportation, Video

Watch 24 hours of NYC subway activity in one hypnotizing map

By Michelle Cohen, Tue, December 27, 2016

Who knew watching the movements of the New York City subway could be such a relaxing activity. A new data visualization created by Will Geary shows a day’s worth of subway routes in motion in one mesmerizing creation. To build the map, Geary used Processing and Carto software, as well as the framework of another tutorial from Juan Francisco Saldarriaga, pulling data from the MTA and Google Maps to determine the flux. And for some extra fun, the whole thing is set to “Rhapsody in Blue!”

Watch the subway map on the move

CityRealty, infographic, real estate trends

Average Manhattan sales price tops $2M for first time

By Dana Schulz, Wed, December 14, 2016

Despite chatter about the luxury market slowing down, 2016 has seen Manhattan real estate prices continue to climb and set records. The average sales price for an apartment (including both co-ops and condos) was $2.2 million, topping the $1.9 million record set last year, according to CityRealty’s newly released Year-End Manhattan Market Report. This is a whopping 91 percent increase from 2006. And things heat up even more in the new development sector, where 1,800 units sold for a projected total of $8.9 billion, a huge jump from last year’s $5.4 billion for $1,464 units.

More record-setting data ahead

infographic, maps

According to a 2016 Pew report, the middle class is shrinking in 90 percent of U.S. cities. It’s the first time in our nation’s history that the middle class doesn’t make up the economic majority. Instead, the highest- and lowest-income households combined comprise over 50 percent of the population. And in New York City, the divide is startling. One in five New Yorkers live below the poverty line, while the upper five percent of Manhattan residents earned more than $860,000 in 2014. GIS software company Esri has created a series of interactive maps that visualize this wealth divide in NYC and across the country, revealing where the richest and poorest live and the new economic divisions that are forming in our major metropolitan areas.

Maps, this way

holidays, infographic

what to do with your thanksgiving leftovers infographic, what to do with your thanksgiving leftovers, thanksgiving infographic

We all know this scene well: You’ve finally woken from your Thanksgiving Day food coma, and you emerge from your bedroom and stumble into the kitchen looking for a midday snack. You swing open your fridge door only to find yourself faced with container after container full of leftovers. While another turkey leg in your stomach doesn’t sound so terrible, the idea of getting lost in a tryptophan-induced haze is far less appealing. Thankfully, the clever folks over at Co.Design have created a cool infographic featuring some unexpected and amazing leftovers recipes that go beyond a turkey sandwich slapped together with mustard. With dishes ranging from fried stuffing bites to mashed potato gnocchi to a delectable pie milkshake, there’s no shortage of inspiring post-Turkey Day plated things. Get a magnified look all the culinary genius here.

infographic, maps

Language map, jill hubley, maps, nyc neighborhoods

Life in New York City in all its diversity means hearing a colorful mix of languages spoken every day. Web developer and artist Jill Hubley‘s new census map (h/t Gothamist) shows us which languages are spoken by New Yorkers at home in their neighborhoods. Hubley intially created the Languages of NYC map for a GISMO exhibit at the Queens Museum entitled, “Map Mosaic: From Queens to the World” with data from the United States Census Bureau’s American Community Survey. The result is a colorful tableau of native tongues, from Russian in Brighton Beach to Spanish in Sunset Park, with large swaths of French Creole in Brooklyn and Chinese in lower Manhattan–and those are the ones we already expected. The map allows you to view “islands” of one or more languages or to view them all.

Check out the map

infographic

When it comes to the richest people in the world, the disparity is staggering, and what better way to exemplify this than by sizing these individuals up against the nation’s most expensive real estate market, in a city that’s home to more billionaires than anywhere else. PropertyShark took data from Forbes’ World Billionaires List and created an infographic that shows how the world’s 12 richest people have enough wealth to buy all of Manhattan’s residential stock for $578 billion and still have some pocket change leftover.

See the full infographic here

infographic, maps, Queens

Queens is one of the most diverse places on the planet, and it’s believed that around 500 languages are spoken here. Fifty-nine of these, however, are endangered, meaning that those who speak these languages are the last people on Earth who know them. This number is staggering, considering the fact that UNESCO puts the worldwide number of “critically endangered” languages at 574, which is why artist Mariam Ghani has embarked on a mapping project that explores these disappearing tongues. First shared by Fast Co. Design, The Garden of the Forked Tongues is an online, interactive graphic and an acrylic mural in the Queens Museum, both of which plot colored polygons to represent how the languages are distributed throughout the borough.

All the info

Architecture, Celebrities, CityRealty, infographic

Michael Phelps took his world record to 21 gold medals last night; Usain Bolt is poised to become the first athlete to win three golds at three Olympics; and Serena Williams (tied with sister Venus) has the most gold medals of any tennis player in the games. To have a little fun with these athletes’ stats, CityRealty.com put together this infographic that shows how long it would take the Olympians to sprint, serve, and swim their way to the top of New York City’s three tallest planned and built residential buildings — the Central Park Tower, 111 West 57th Street, and 432 Park Avenue.

Check out the full-size infographic here

Art, infographic

Underwater New York, Atlas Obscura, Quester I, Submarine, Coney Island Bay, Arthur Kill, Underwater Finds, Frying Pan, Nicki Pombier Berger

The collectors of curious things at Atlas Obscura bring us the work of Underwater New York, a fascinating catalogue of all the weird stuff that’s been found bobbing, sinking or washed-up from the murky depths of the city’s waterways, from a giraffe skeleton to a grand piano, with a bag of lottery tickets thrown in for good measure. In a fascinating study in what-is-it-and-where-is-it-coming from, founder Nicki Pombier Berger and the site’s editors and contributors (artists, filmmakers, musicians, photographers and other storytellers) create contexts for the curiosities that find their way to this aquatic lost and found.

New York City waterways, like the swampy southern Brooklyn beach known as Dead Horse Bay, and their submerged treasures are the inspiration for works in this digital gallery of sorts. Berger and fellow editors Helen Georgas and Nicole Haroutunian compile a growing list (it currently contains 150 objects) of waterfront finds that they’ve discovered via everything from news articles to anecdotes. Contributors are encouraged to use the objects to weave their stories in whatever medium they choose.

Find out more of the bizarre items found beneath the waves

Art, infographic, Policy, real estate trends

SITU, Storefront for Art and Architecture, Property Taxes, Section 581, Sharing Models: Manhattanisms, Billionaire's Row, Taxes

“Section 581” by SITU Studio, Photograph by Patrick Mandeville

Billionaires get off nearly tax-free and billions go uncollected due to flaws in the way the city assesses property value. As part of a new exhibit at the Storefront for Art and Architecture in Soho, interdisciplinary architecture firm SITU Studio created visual representations of these inequities in one of their most glaring examples: the buildings along Central Park.

New York City’s property tax structure assigns higher real property taxes to renters than it does to the infamous absentee owners of the trophy condos on Billionaires’ Row, short-changing the city of millions in annual revenue, according to CityLab. The acrylic bands in the SITU models show the disparity between the taxed value of these properties and the sky-high amounts they’d actually sell for.

Find out how the state law is giving billionaires a free lunch

City Living, Design, infographic, Products

Easily put a name to New York’s discarded paraphernalia and putrid odors with the help of the Periodic Table of NYC Trash. This nifty design, created by writer Molly Young and graphic designer Teddy Blanks, places 118 recurring New York City elements into a handy tabular array that, like the real periodic table that inspired it, provides a useful framework for analyzing behavior (in this case, that of New Yorkers).

All of the trash depicted in the poster was pulled straight off our city’s filthy streets and photographed by Young and Blanks. What’s featured includes everything from an innocuous Metro Card and stray baby sock to gag-inducing finds like a dead rat and a bottle of pee. Everything has also been handily divvied up into nine different categories that include apparel, beverage, food, hygiene, household, lifestyle, municipal, packing, and vices.

See the full size version here

infographic, maps

Puzzled at how many conversations about international issues turned to the subject of immigration no matter what the original context might have been, NYC-based entrepreneur and data visualization geek Max Galka created a map showing the flow of immigration to and from each of the world’s nations to better visualize where the patterns really lay.

In addition to topics like terrorism, Brexit, this year’s presidential race and the refugee crisis, according to Galka, immigration was “being mentioned in connection with all sorts of topics I never would have expected.” Finding that the debates on immigration, though sometimes heated, were lacking in factual information, he hopes that his mapping efforts, brought to us via his blog Metrocosm, can provide some real-world context on questions like, “how many migrants are there? Where are they coming from? And where are they going?”

Take a look at the map to see who’s coming and going

Architecture, infographic, New Developments

nyc buildings compared to world buildings

Gray silhouettes from left to right: Shanghai World Financial Center, CTF Finance Centre, One WTC, Lotte World Tower, Mecca Royal Clock Tower, Shanghai Tower, Burj Khalifa. Click link here to enlarge >>

As the Skyscraper Museum so aptly writes, “Tall and BIG are not the same thing.”

Echoing 6sqft’s recent post on global supertalls, the infographic above illustrates how when the height of New York’s tallest towers are stacked up against the sky-high constructions abroad (and 1 WTC), our city’s skyscrapers truly are “runts on the world’s stage.” The image also reveals that not only do these towers lack significantly in height, but also in girth. This means what really makes the design of all of New York’s new skyscrapers so unique is not how tall they are, but rather, how slender they are.

more on all that here

CityRealty, infographic, real estate trends

For the second quarter in a row, average condo sales prices in Manhattan are breaking records. The first three months of 2016 saw $4.59 billion in aggregate sales, breaking the previous record of $4.57 billion that was set last quarter, according to data from CityRealty. The average sales price topped out at $2.9 million, also significantly higher than last quarter’s $2.5 million. These figures aren’t surprising considering 24 percent of all condo sales during the beginning of this year were at or above $10 million, with new luxury developments like 432 Park Avenue, The Greenwich Lane, and 150 Charles Street accounting for the uptick.

More stats this way

Celebrities, CityRealty, infographic, real estate trends

nfl draft salaries

It’s no secret that the NFL’s top draft picks command starting salaries well into the eight-figure range, but to really put into perspective just how crazy-big their paychecks are, CityRealty‘s latest infographic takes a look at what the last five #1 picks could buy in Manhattan with their money. And on top of that, how these hypothetical one-off property purchases translate into real estate portfolios in their hometowns. (Teaser: Quarterback Jameis Winston could either buy a $24.95M pad at The Eldorado or 107 homes in his native Tampa, FL!)

Check out the full-size infographic here

City Living, infographic, Policy

The Association Between Income and Life Expectancy in the United States, 2001-2014, JAMA, Journal of the American Medical Association, Longevity, Income, Gap between rich and poor, geography and longevity, do new yorkers live longer

The Association Between Income and Life Expectancy in the United States, 2001-2014,” by the Journal of the American Medical Association; Life expectancy for all income quartiles.

The New York Times recently took a look at the results of a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). Using data compiled from anonymous earnings records and death certificates, the results offer some provocative insights into the importance of geography to how long people live–poor people in particular.

There is, as we’ve already assumed, a longevity gap between the rich (in this study, people with household incomes of over $100,000 per year) and poor (those with incomes less than $28,000). In Manhattan, for example, the average poor person will die about six years before the average rich one. But that gap is about a year and a half smaller than the same income/longevity gap for the United States as a whole. Tulsa and Detroit, for example, were two cities with the lowest levels of life expectancy among the low-income population, with the results already adjusted for differences based on race.

Find out what the numbers look like where you live

Featured Story

CityRealty, Features, holidays, infographic, real estate trends

ireland vs. nyc

Get out your green, because in honor of St. Patrick’s Day we’re putting a twist on the classic real estate comparison conundrum pinning some of the coolest Irish castles currently up for sale against a few New York castles (a.k.a. really expensive condos). Hit the jump to see what’s available in the $2 to $12 million range, and then cast a vote for whether you’d rather having a sprawling 700-year-old stone castle with 380 acres of land in Ireland, or a comfy four-bedroom penthouse at The Brompton in Yorkville. And if you’re not into castles or condos, we’ve also figured out how many pints of Guinness you can get for the median price of an apartment…

Which would you pick?

Featured Story

CityRealty, Features, infographic, Starchitecture

432 Park Avenue, DBOX, Macklowe Properties, Vinoly, Deborah Berke (52)

Closings at Macklowe Properties/CIM Group‘s Billionaires’ Row blockbuster 432 Park Avenue officially commenced just eight days into the new year, and now that enough time has gone by for these sales to be re-listed as rentals, CityRealty has put together an informative infographic that takes a look at the numbers at New York City’s tallest and most expensive residential building. There’s a lot of fun and fascinating info to be found ahead, but one of the most surprising facts? Of the 141 units available, only 13 have sold to date.

See the full infographic here

infographic, maps, Technology, Transportation

Subspotting, Maps, Subway Phone Reception, MTA, Transportation,

The MTA is apparently well into the middle phase of its project to wire 279 below-ground subway stations with cell reception, but as Citylab recently put it, “there are still places you can’t make a call to save your life.” Into this unfortunate void comes the Subspotting project, brainchild of Daniel Goddemeyer and Dominikus Baur, which offers maps “illustrating the unequal geography of subway reception” and helpfully providing information on where you’ll be able to make a call or send a text while in transit. In addition to system and individual line maps, there’s an app that shows the quality of reception as different sized bars at each station, and MTA-sanctioned posters.

Can you hear me now?

infographic, real estate trends

Donald Trump‘s fellow Republican presidential candidates have been focused on him releasing tax documents, but since he claims he’s not in the position to do so since he’s been audited, this little tidbit might make for some good temporary fodder — Trump’s luxury Manhattan properties owe the city for 19 unpaid violations that have amounted to $27,536 over the past 12 years.

I Quant NY scoured the city’s building records to find that since 2000, at least 14 of his Manhattan properties have received 460 separate violations, totaling $304,165 in fines. Sure this may be a drop in the bucket for the GOP frontrunner, but it’s the lack of compliance that seems troubling, especially since only 6 percent of the instances were dismissed. And 2015 had the most violations to date, with 62 separate fines for “Failure to Maintain an Elevator.”

Get the rest of the details

City Living, infographic

If you’ve got the urge to merge, it might be time for a career change. With the romance-obsessed holiday around the corner, the folks at Bloomberg Business delved into the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2014 American Community Survey to find out which professions are pairing off. To that end, they’ve created a fascinating interactive chart that reveals the most common occupation/relationship marriage matchups for any selected occupation.

Some findings aren’t surprising: “High-earning women tend to pair up with their economic equals, while middle- and lower-tier women often marry up. In other words, female CEOs tend to marry other CEOs; male CEOs are okay marrying their secretaries.”

So Who’s Marrying Whom?

infographic, real estate trends

NYCHPD, Monadnock, My Micro NY, Micro-Apartments, Earth Day, nArchitects, modular construction

Just before the new year, listings went live for NYC’s first micro apartment complex Carmel Place (aka My Micro NY aka 335 East 27th Street) in anticipation of its opening in March. The nine-story modular development in Kips Bay has 55 studios that are 260 to 360 square feet. Of these, 22 are affordable (more than 60,000 people applied for them), and they’ll go from $950 to $1,500 a month depending on size and income.

The remaining market-rate units will range from $2,500 to $2,900 per month, which has left many skeptics questioning why anyone would fork over nearly three grand for a space that is far smaller than conventional studios. To put this argument into an actual visualization, the data gurus over at NeighborhoodX created a simple, yet informative graph that compares the rental price per square foot at Carmel Place with that of regular studios across the city (h/t Curbed).

More here

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