holidays

Greenwich Village, holidays

$1,000, as the Post notes, could pay for more than 600 meals for the homeless at the Bowery Mission, or 25 holiday gifts for in-need New Yorkers through the Winter Wishes program. It could also get you an “exotic” white fir Christmas tree off the street in Greenwich Village. Sixteen-year tree saleswoman Heather Neville, who runs a stand at Seventh Avenue and 11th Street, is charging $77 per foot for a 13-foot tree, which equals $750. Add to that a $200 stand, $25 delivery and setup fee, and $20 for the three men doing the job, and you’ve got yourself a four-figure Christmas tree.

If you think this is bad, just wait

Featured Story

Features, holidays, Murray Hill, photography, The urban lens

6sqft’s ongoing series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. In this installment, award-winning photographers James and Karla Murray return with a look inside Rolf’s German Restaurant, known for its over-the-top Christmas decorations. Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

Beginning the last week of September, a six-man team starts the process of adorning Rolf’s German Restaurant with 15,000 Christmas ornaments, 10,000 lights, and thousands of icicles. By the first of November, the process of turning this historic Murray Hill restaurant into a holiday wonderland is complete, attracting both locals and tourists who are eager to see the one-of-a-kind display of Victorian-style decorations.

We recently paid a visit to Rolf’s, capturing everything from dolls found in New England antique shops to 19th century German ball ornaments worth hundreds of thousands of dollars. And we’ve shared an interview with owner Bob Maisano where he talks about the building’s past life as a speakeasy during Prohibition, German history in NYC, and what makes Rolf’s a unique holiday destination.

All the photos and the interview with Bob

Featured Story

apartment living 101, Design, Features, Green Design, holidays, NYC Guides

Our ongoing series Apartment Living 101 is aimed at helping New Yorkers navigate the challenges of creating a happy home in the big city. This week we’ve rounded up some alternative holiday tree ideas for those living in tight spaces.

While you could buy a Charlie Brown tree, or try ask to have a few feet knocked off that pine when you hit the register, if you’re a small space dweller who wants a more eco-friendly holiday arbol this year, there are plenty of options for you beyond the classic artificial fir (which fyi is even more environmentally unsound than chopping down an evergreen thanks to the carcinogens produced during manufacturing and disposal). From edible trees to LED pines to DIY options that smell just as good as the real thing, 6sqft has searched high and low for 10 different types of sustainable Christmas tree alternatives to jazz your apartment up with this year—and years to come.

ten alternative ideas here

Featured Story

6sqft gift guide, Events, Features, holidays

The 15 best NYC holiday markets and indie pop-up shops

By Michelle Cohen, Wed, November 30, 2016

2016 nyc holiday markets

December’s first days bring a dazzling parade of holiday gift markets all vying for the opportunity to find new homes for a bounty of goodies and crafty gifts. We’re all familiar with the big NYC markets at Bryant Park and Union Square, but some of the best finds—and the most fun—can be found at smaller, cooler pop-ups and neighborhood markets. Some are only around for a weekend, others for the whole month or longer. In addition to locally-made jewelry and crafts, vintage finds, artfully curated fashions, home items and other things we didn’t know we needed, these hip retail outposts sparkle with drinks, food, workshops, tarot readings, nail art, music, and family fun to keep shoppers’ spirits bright.

Find out where to get the goods

6sqft gift guide, holidays

Do you hear what I hear? I think it’s Lightning Bolt…

Though the resurgence of beards and maxi-dresses makes the classic version look almost au courant, a company called Modern Nativity has created a tongue-in-cheek take on the iconic Christmas manger scene with an update for the smartphone set. The “hipster nativity” was born, like many a great idea, over happy hour beers between friends. Founder Casey Wright tells Mashable that after having an illustrator sketch it up, the idea looked too good to leave on the drawing board.

I played my Spotify mix for Him

History, holidays, Video

Before the days of Amazon, last-minute holiday shopping actually required putting clothes on and interacting with other human beings. To fully understand just how far we’ve come (and really appreciate the ability to “add to cart”), take a look at this HD stock footage from Critical Past that shows the rush of New York holiday shoppers in 1930. The sidewalks are a sea of black trench coats, with shoppers trying to squeeze their way into stores on 34th Street and buy wares from vendors on what looks like it may be Orchard Street, once the hub of discount shopping.

Watch the full video

holidays, infographic

what to do with your thanksgiving leftovers infographic, what to do with your thanksgiving leftovers, thanksgiving infographic

We all know this scene well: You’ve finally woken from your Thanksgiving Day food coma, and you emerge from your bedroom and stumble into the kitchen looking for a midday snack. You swing open your fridge door only to find yourself faced with container after container full of leftovers. While another turkey leg in your stomach doesn’t sound so terrible, the idea of getting lost in a tryptophan-induced haze is far less appealing. Thankfully, the clever folks over at Co.Design have created a cool infographic featuring some unexpected and amazing leftovers recipes that go beyond a turkey sandwich slapped together with mustard. With dishes ranging from fried stuffing bites to mashed potato gnocchi to a delectable pie milkshake, there’s no shortage of inspiring post-Turkey Day plated things. Get a magnified look all the culinary genius here.

Events, holidays

felix balloon, first balloon macy's thankgiving day paradeFelix the Cat 1927 – first balloon in Macy’s Parade

In 1927, three years after its first incarnation, the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade replaced its live animals with balloons designed by marionette maker Anthony Frederick Sarg and made by the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company (more on that here). The first such animal-shaped balloon was Felix the Cat, and after a nearly 90-year hiatus, the Times reports that he’s returning to the parade this year.

Read more

Events, holidays

macys thanksgiving day parade, macy's elves

The 90th annual Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade will be held on Thursday and several streets will be closed as thousands of spectators come out to see the parade. In order to get the best view, it is advised that you get to the parade location as early as 6 a.m. The parade will begin at 9 a.m. at 77th Street and Central Park West. It will travel 2.5 miles and end at Macy’s Herald Square on 34th Street. Macy’s has also setup a fun and interactive website that provides detailed information about this year’s parade, including where to watch, this year’s lineup, and a timeline showing past parades in New York City.

A FULL LIST OF STREET CLOSURES AT METRO NY…

Celebrities, History, holidays, Upper East Side

Last week, a commemorative plaque was installed on the facade of the former Upper East Side home of Harry Houdini at 244 East 79th Street, marking the 90th anniversary of his death and celebrating National Magic Week. To coincide with this, the Society of American Magicians will meet tomorrow for a séance at the building’s Sojourn restaurant in hopes of contacting the great illusionist. As the Wall Street Journal notes, when he and his family moved into the top-floor studio of the boardinghouse in 1887, a young Houdini practiced his tricks and escapes in the space that now holds the eatery.

The rest of the story here

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