Historic Homes

Cool Listings, Historic Homes, Interiors, Upper West Side 

247 Central Park West, William Noble’s private residence, Walt Disney’s niece, Keith Monda remodel

William Noble would roll over in his grave if he knew the fate of his beloved private residence. The prominent developer built a cluster of spec homes toward the end of the 19th century and chose 247 Central Park West for himself. This 10,745-square-foot home’s impressive history continues as it was once the home of Walt Disney’s grandniece and it remains one of the few single-family homes on Central Park.

However, history turns a bit sour beginning in 2006 when Keith Monda, president of Coach, purchased the home and spent a year renovating it as a gallery for his art. He sold the remodeled home to Ukrainian businessman Igor Iankovsky in 2012. Iankovsky apparently never moved in, preferring his French residence instead, and he has been trying to sell the home ever since. We’re not sure if it’s the renovation’s mixed reviews or the sky-high prices, but for some reason this home toggles back and forth on the sales and rental markets. Well, now it’s back with another price drop, asking $27.75 million or $65,000 a month.

Let’s take a look inside

Cool Listings, Historic Homes, Interiors, Soho

85 Mercer Street, Soho Cast Iron Historic District, original tin ceilings, lofted bedroom

A sprawling one-bedroom loft in the heart of Soho’s Cast Iron Historic District just popped up on the market, asking $3.25 million. This co-op at 85 Mercer Street is quite the looker with original pressed tin ceilings, cast iron columns, and plenty of light. But the most interesting feature of this modernized prewar loft is probably where you’ll be laying your head at night.

Take a look inside, here

Cool Listings, Historic Homes, Interiors, Park Slope

312 Garfield Place, Prospect Park , brownstone mansion, Victorian townhouse

What if you had the opportunity to live in a 7,000-square-foot brownstone mansion on a picturesque block just a stone’s throw away from Prospect Park? That’s just a taste of what 312 Garfield Place has to offer, for $6.995 million. It is believed that the brilliant home was built by developer William Flannigan for New York businessman J. J Galligan sometime during the turn of the 20th century. The resulting five-story building has a distinct Victorian charm with a light Renaissance touch.

Take a look inside, here

Featured Story

Events, Features, Historic Homes, Interiors

NYC house tours

Though spring is typically considered the height of house tour season, the fall months offer their own roster of open-door events. It pretty much goes without saying that we love peeking inside all kinds of homes, so we’ve rounded up here the best of the upcoming tours. From industrial Tribeca lofts to Victorian homes on the Delaware River, there’s definitely something for every interior design lover.

All the events here

Brooklyn, Clinton Hill, Historic Homes, real estate trends

102 Gates, Brownstone, Townhouse, Renovation, Flip, Clinton Hill, Brooklyn, Real estate

In January of 2013, in the dead of winter, an 1899 detail-laden Italianate townhouse fixer-upper at 102 Gates Avenue hit an inventory-starved rising market. The listing price of $1.295 million, was a double-take for many, even though it was less than what properties like it were selling for in the area.

Fast forward to September 2014, where renovations, which commenced almost immediately after the sale, are nearing completion (and according to reports, they’ve been done right). Word is that the house is about to head back to the market—at more than twice its winter selling price.

Find out why 375 people waited in the cold for the first open house

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, Historic Homes, History, Manhattan

new york's most famous homes, the dakota, Stuyvesant Flats, The Osborne Flats, The Plaza Hotel, The Ansonia Apartments, Hotel des Artistes

The newest apartment houses, be it now or some 150 years ago has always been of great interest to New York buyers and renters. And like today, their appeal make sell-outs as easy as pie. From Manhattan’s very first apartment building to those that followed a decade or so later, those initial projects continue to remain the city’s most coveted digs—not to mention the city’s most expensive. But what stands out among these famous buildings as the years passed was the introduction of not-yet-available services—ranging from running water and elevators to electricity and communal amenities. Whether we are talking about the Dakota or the luxurious the Osborne Flats, learn why these century-plus-old buildings continue to enchant the rich, the famous, and the rest of us.

Click here for Cliffs Notes on NYC’s most historic homes

Cool Listings, East Village, Historic Homes, Interiors

114 East 10th Street, Renwick Triangle, James Renwick jr., St. Mark’s Historic District

Situated in the St. Mark’s Historic District, 114 East 10th Street and the surrounding Anglo-Italianate houses make up what many consider the most beautiful street in the East Village. Prominent architect James Renwick Jr. designed the original home as part of the distinguished Renwick Triangle back in 1861—some of the last single-family dwellings built in the neighborhood. This gut-renovated, historic townhouse didn’t have the best of luck when it sold for $5 million cash after several price drops from its initial $7 million asking. However, after four years, the six-story townhouse has emerged bright, fresh, and asking $7.5 million.

Take a look inside, here

Featured Story

Features, Historic Homes, History, Manhattan

the rembrandt, 152 West 57th Street

The Rembrandt at 152 West 57th Street between Sixth and Seventh Avenues was built as Manhattan’s first co-op in 1881. Apartment ownership was already in fashion across the pond, particularly in France and Britain, but the concept of a resident-owned building was still an unknown to most of us. Developed by a syndicate led by Jared B. Flagg, a clergyman with an avid interest in real estate, and built by the notable architectural firm of Hubert & Pirsson, the group had come to the conclusion that potential buyers would be drawn to a building where they would have control over expenses. For instance, buying coal and ice in bulk in order to keep prices down, and hiring a full-time communal staff to take care of the owners’ laundry, cooking and the running the elevators.

Built as a brick and brownstone building with terra-cotta trim and jerkin-head gable windows at the top, the unit mix—a result of an interlocking system of staggered floor heights to allow for very tall art studio spaces—included a few duplex apartments with as many as 12 rooms. Original brochure prices reportedly ranged between $4,000 and $5,000, with monthly maintenance as low as $50. Confident in the ultimate success of co-operative living, Mr. Flagg with Hubert & Pirsson continued to develop another six co-op projects that very same year.

The history of co-ops and their rise, fall, and rise again into popularity

Cool Listings, Historic Homes, Interiors, Park Slope

27 7th avenue, Brooklyn Home company, park slope townhouse, brooklyn townhouse, new york townhouse, cool interiors brooklyn, amazing brooklyn homes

This meticulously renovated four-story townhouse located at 27 7th Avenue in Park Slope is a stunning example of the “best of both worlds”. While careful to retain gorgeous period details such as decorative mantels, original millwork, plaster mouldings, pier mirrors and pockets doors, The Brooklyn Home Company left no stone unturned in its quest for modernity within the home’s classic interior.

See how old seamlessly meets new

Historic Homes, Interiors, Recent Sales

431 West 162nd Street, Jumel Terrace neighborhood, most expensive townhouse in Washington Heights

Acknowledged back in June as the most expensive townhouse in Washington Heights, this historic home at 431 West 162nd Street was met with skepticism from local bloggers. They cited its “colorful wall-to-wall carpeting” and the dearth of immediate amenities in the area. But according to city records, the townhouse has sold for $2.38 million, less than $200,000 under its $2.5 million asking price and still higher than any other townhouse in the area. Looks like Washington Heights gets the last laugh here.

Take a look inside the home that beat the odds

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