Historic Homes

East Village, Historic Homes, Hotels

merchant's house museum, nyc museums, east village

In June, a petition was filed in New York Supreme Court to prevent the construction of an eight-story hotel next door to the historic Merchant’s House Museum in the East Village. Now, Curbed reports, the proposal to build the hotel was unanimously rejected Thursday by the City Council’s subcommittee on zoning and franchises. The 186-year-old townhouse belonged to hardware merchant Seabury Tredwell, who bought the 10,000-square-foot residence for $18,000 in 1832.

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Carroll Gardens, Historic Homes, Landmarks Preservation Commission

236 President Street, 238 President Street, LPC

(on right) 236 and (on left) 238 President Street via LPC

The city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission on Tuesday designated the Hans S. Christian Memorial Kindergarten at 236 President Street and the adjacent apartment building at 238 President Street as individual landmarks. The two Carroll Gardens buildings are associated with Elmira Christian, an advocate for early childhood education. “These two properties are distinguished by their architecture and share a great history of education and social reform in Brooklyn,” LPC Vice Chair Frederick Bland said in a statement.

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Bed Stuy, Historic Homes, Recent Sales

247 hancock place, nyc mansion, brooklyn mansion, john c kelley mansion, bed-stuy mansion

Bedford-Stuyvesant‘s most expensive home has sold for $6.3 million, setting a record price for the neighborhood and sending a message that rising property prices are making their way further into Brooklyn, according to the Wall Street Journal. At nearly twice the previous record sale of $3.3 million in 2017, the Renaissance Revival-style John C. Kelley mansion at 247 Hancock Street is the most expensive single-family house ever sold in Bed-Stuy. The 8,000-square-foot, 10-bedroom townhouse was built in 1887 for water-meter magnate John Kelley, designed by noted architect Montrose Morris and modeled after a Gilded Age Vanderbilt mansion along Fifth Avenue.

Take a look inside this incredible mansion

Brooklyn Heights, Cool Listings, Historic Homes

24 Middagh Street, Brooklyn Heights, Brooklyn

Owning a piece of New York City history just got a little cheaper. The oldest home in Brooklyn Heights, located at 24 Middagh Street, has hit the market again, this time asking $4.5 million, a price drop of over $2 million from when it was listed last year. The five-bedroom Federal-style home boasts a private, landscaped courtyard and a separate two-bedroom carriage house.

Enough of a discount?

Cool Listings, Gramercy Park, Historic Homes, Interiors

In 1876, Philadelphia hosted the Centennial International Exhibition, the country’s first official World’s Fair, which brought new technologies and European styles to the forefront. One outcome was a new interest in Aestheticism, especially in New York City. As The Met explains, the “cultural phenomenon” was “the flourishing of an artistic culture and lifestyle” with “an intense interest in collecting and decoration.” And if you want to see a modern-day display of this more-is-more trend, look no further than this opulent co-op at 34 Gramercy Park East. Listed for $2,950,000 (including a coveted key to the Park), the home underwent a recent renovation that looked towards the Aesthetic Movement, restoring period details of the city’s oldest co-op

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Cool Listings, Crown Heights, Historic Homes

190 New york Avenue

For the many house-hunters seeking a townhouse in Crown Heights, this $3.5 million Colonial Revival mansion at 190 New York Avenue is a fine example of the neighborhood’s grand history. The area known as the St. Marks District was, at the turn of the 19th century, home to many of the borough’s wealthiest residents, with streets lined with large free-standing or semi-detached homes like this one. This four-story townhouse measures an unusually large 30 feet by 59 feet on a 109-foot lot. Inside are 14 rooms including seven bedrooms, seven fireplaces and a master bedroom that’s blessed with a terrace. And here’s a fun fact–according to the listing, a one-time tenant was the prolific singer and actress Ethel Waters

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Featured Story

Connecticut, Cool Listings, Features, Historic Homes, Upstate

Millennials are masters of upcycling, the practice beyond recycling products and things to not just reuse them but make them better. This trend is now extending to the real estate sector, where we’re seeing some pretty spectacular renovations of historic barns into stunning homes. Below are five great examples of upcycling historic barns in a way that modernized the structures and added luxe amenities while honoring the authenticity and origin of the structures. All for sale and all within a few hours drive of New York City, these barn homes can be your country dream – or reality.

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East Village, Historic Homes, Hotels

merchant's house museum, nyc museums, east village

The museum via Google street view

The Merchant’s House Museum and its supporters filed a petition on Monday in New York Supreme Court against the construction of an eight-story hotel planned next door. The 186-year-old East Village home at 29 East Fourth Street belonged to hardware merchant Seabury Tredwell, who bought the 10,000-square-foot residence for $18,000 in 1832. The museum, which has been remarkably preserved since then, became the first property in Manhattan to be designated a New York City landmark in 1965. But landmark status does not guarantee protection from any adjacent construction projects. The museum is now taking legal action against the hotel project because, as its executive director, Margaret “Pi” Halsey Gardiner, told the WSJ: “It’s not going to be able to survive construction next door, I guarantee you.”

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Cool Listings, Historic Homes, Upstate

116 Premium Point, All View, Westchester, Halstead, waterfront mansion,

Prepare to be stunned by this waterfront mansion that’s just hit the market within commuting distance of New York City. The 35-room Westchester estate, appropriately named “All View” by its original 19th-century owner, sits grandly atop a three-acre peninsula jutting out into the Long Island Sound. The grounds (conceived of by Central Park and Prospect Park designer Frederick Law Olmsted) do not disappoint; neither does the house, which is full of historic details but has also received modern — and a few whimsical — renovations. It now boasts 13 bedrooms, nine wood-burning fireplaces, three kitchens, and a new geothermal heat and air conditioning system. The best part? Every single room offers a view of the water.

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Clinton Hill, Historic Homes, History, Landmarks Preservation Commission

walt whitman, 99 ryerson street, LPC

Photo of Whitman via Wikimedia; Photo of 99 Ryerson Street via NYC LGBT Historic Sites Project

A coalition of preservationists, LGBT groups and literary experts is asking the Landmarks Preservation Commission to reassess their decision last year to not landmark Walt Whitman’s Brooklyn home, the last residence of the 19th-century poet remaining in New York. Located at 99 Ryerson Street in Clinton Hill, the home was where Whitman and his family lived between May 1, 1855 and May 1, 1856.

While living at the home, Whitman wrote “Leaves of Grass,” a collection of poems considered to be one of the most significant American works ever. The home is also one of the earliest extant buildings in NYC associated with a member of the LGBT community.

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