Historic Homes

Celebrities, Cool Listings, Hamptons, Historic Homes

Listing photos courtesy of Douglas Elliman

In 1705, this home was built for Nehemiah Whitman, great-grandfather to Walt Whitman. It’s also where the poet’s grandfather, Jesse Whitman, was born. And in 1881, according to Douglas Elliman, Walt Whitman himself visited the property, stopping at its private cemetery where he “composed a lament on the graves of his ancestors.” Since its construction, the Colonial has had only four owners, and after last selling in 1995, it’s now on the market for $750,000. Known as the Whitman-Rome house, it retains tons of original details like pine-floorboards, ceiling beams, wooden doors, and four fireplaces.

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Cool Listings, Financial District, Historic Homes

All photos courtesy of Anthony Puopolo for Douglas Elliman

Here’s an opportunity to influence the future of one of New York City’s oldest streets. Goldman Properties is selling three of its mixed-use buildings located on Stone Street in the Financial District for $20.75 million. As the city’s first paved street in New York, Stone Street’s history dates back to the middle of the 1600s and today remains a car-free cobblestone-lined walkway with an outdoor dining scene that predates the pandemic. The portfolio includes three buildings with a total of ten free-market two-bedroom and three-bedroom loft rentals and three operating restaurants.

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Cool Listings, Historic Homes, Soho

 All photos courtesy of Douglas Elliman

A 19th-century custom-designed Soho building once owned by William Waldorf Astor is on the market for $17 million. Located at 435 Broome Street, the Victorian Gothic building was built in 1873 by famed architect William Appleton Potter and features five tall loft stories framed by exterior cast-iron colonnettes and capitals. As the listing describes, the property, located between Broadway and Crosby Street, is the “perfect multi-functioning property for retail, office, or residential mixed-use.”

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Historic Homes, Landmarks Preservation Commission, Washington Heights

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. (1937). Riverside Drive, no. 857, at 159th Street, Manhattan, courtesy of the New York Public Library.

Preservationists and local politicians are pushing the city to reverse their decision to not landmark a historic home with abolitionist history in Washington Heights. The two-story wood-frame home at 857 Riverside Drive in Upper Manhattan was owned by anti-slavery activist Dennis Harris who may have also been an Underground Railroad conductor. Despite a demolition permit filed by the current owner, the Landmarks Preservation Commission last November still rejected landmark status for the home because of the architectural alterations made to the original structure.

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Cool Listings, Historic Homes, Upstate

All photos courtesy of RMC Real Estate Photography for Ellis Sotheby’s International Realty

In New Windsor, a 19th-century stone castle is on the market for $1.225 million. Located on two acres of land overlooking the Hudson River, the Roe Brewster Castle at 11 Oak Ridge Drive was constructed in 1870 and features fixtures designed by Louis Comfort Tiffany. The 8,400-square-foot estate has six bedrooms and seven baths but has operated as a multi-family rental property.

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Cool Listings, Hamptons, Historic Homes

All photos courtesy of Douglas Elliman

An East Hampton Village home with roots dating back to the 17th-century is on the market for $4.495 million. The property at 177 Main Street was originally a Colonial saltbox built in 1680 and owned by John Mulford, one of the founders of the village. The home was named Congress Hall in the mid-19th-century as then-owner David Mulford used the space for local men to gather and talk about politics. After the site sold in 2012, owners transformed the property into a 5,500-square-foot compound with five bedrooms and five-and-a-half baths.

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Historic Homes, Staten Island

Photos courtesy of New York State Office of Parks, Recreation & Historic Preservation

The National Park Service this month placed a Staten Island farmhouse once owned by Frederick Law Olmsted on the National Register of Historic Places. Formerly part of a 130-acre farm, the property, known as the Olmsted-Beil House, is significant for the role it played in Olmsted’s discovery of landscape design and parks as a public good, which later influenced his ideas for Central Park and Prospect Park. Despite its designation as a city landmark in 1967, the house, while intact, has deteriorated over the years and requires significant restoration work.

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Cool Listings, Historic Homes, New Jersey

All photos courtesy of Brown Harris Stevens

An apartment inside a historic church building in Hoboken is now asking $3.05 million. Constructed in 1890, the Romanesque Revival First Baptist Church at 901 Bloomfield Street was converted into a luxury condominium, known as The Raphael, in 2017 with just six residences. The available unit contains three bedrooms, three and a half baths, and a studio loft in the building’s original bell tower. While the conversion led to sleek modern interiors, stunning unique details, including the double-height ceilings and arched windows, were preserved.

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Celebrities, Cool Listings, Hamptons, Historic Homes

Listing photos courtesy of Douglas Elliman

Living in a windmill is unique on its own, but living in the same windmill that Marilyn Monroe once rented is really something else. Built in 1830, the Amagansett windmill was converted to a residence in the 1950s by Samuel Rubin, creator of the Faberge perfume company. Over the years, it was rented by many famous names, including Kurt Vonnegut, Terrance Stamp, and, in 1957, Marilyn Monroe and Arthur Miller, who were looking to get away from the press in the city. The two-bedroom home sits on nearly five-and-a-half acres and is for sale asking $11,500,000.

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Cool Listings, Historic Homes, Upstate

Photo credit: Andrea B. Swenson for Ellis Sotheby’s International Realty

As a partner in the Beaux-Arts architectural firm McKim, Mead & White, Stanford White designed the Washington Square Arch, the Villard Houses, and the Gould Library, among so many others. He also designed the most private residences of the three men, including this late-19th century, shingly Colonial in Rockland County. Located in the Hudson River-front town of Piermont, the four-bedroom home has a striking semi-circular window, tons of original paneled woodwork and doors, and four beautiful fireplaces. After remaining in the same family for four generations, it’s now up for sale asking $1,275,000.

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