Historic Homes

Hell's Kitchen, Historic Homes, History

Photo by James Russiello on WikiCommons

The first Black Catholic church to open above the Mason-Dixon line has been sold for $16 million, as first reported by Bisnow New York. Located at 342 West 53rd Street in Hell’s Kitchen, the former St. Benedict the Moor church was constructed in 1869 as the only church for Black Roman Catholics. The property was sold by the Archdiocese of New York to developer Walter Wang’s JMM Charitable Foundation, whose future plans for the site are unknown, according to W42ST.

Learn more here

Greenwich Village, Historic Homes, Recent Sales

Photos courtesy of Brown Harris Stevens unless otherwise noted

The Greenwich Village townhouse of late civil rights attorney William Kunstler sold last month for $6,500,000, according to CityRealty. Kunstler, who famously defended the Chicago Seven, Malcolm X, Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., and others, and his wife, attorney Margaret Ratner Kunstler, paid $225,000 for the townhouse in 1981, as the Wall Street Journal reported. Located at 13 Gay Street, the four-story brick Greek Revival townhouse was built in 1844 and retains the same 19th-century charm of its neighbors.

Get the details

Historic Homes, History, Manhattan

Photo by Eden, Janine and Jim on Flickr

A historic church that has resided in Manhattan for more than 175 years is set to be demolished, as first reported by Crain’s New York. Located at 154 Lexington Avenue in Nomad, the First Moravian Church served as an important meeting space for patriotic societies and women’s groups and played a critical role in welcoming Armenian immigrants to New York City. An application was filed this month for an 11-story mixed-use building at the site, according to city records.

Learn more

Greenwich Village, Historic Homes, Landmarks Preservation Commission

Photo by Spencer Means on Flickr

A 200-year-old landmarked property in Greenwich Village once home to author Ruth McKenney could soon be demolished. The city’s Department of Buildings last week ordered the immediate demolition of the rowhouse at 14 Gay Street after learning unpermitted work on the building has left it at risk of collapsing. According to The Village Sun, adjacent 16 Gay Street, also constructed in 1827, has also been compromised.

Get the details

Cool Listings, Getting Away, Historic Homes

Photos courtesy of Dynamic Media Solutions

A historic 160-year-old home in a woodsy, waterfront Long Island village is for sale. Located at 381 West Neck Road in Lloyd Harbor, the Charles Homer Davis House, named after the New York City businessman who built it, was constructed in the 1860s in the Second Empire architectural style. Now asking $2,795,000, the remarkably intact clapboard-clad home rises two and a half stories and features a truncated tower, wrap-around porch, and mansard roof.

Get a closer look

Greenwich Village, Historic Homes

Listing photos by Rich Caplan

One of New York City’s skinniest homes entered contract this week. At just nine-and-a-half feet wide, the townhouse at 75 1/2 Bedford Street in Greenwich Village is famous not only for its super slender frame but for its one-time resident, the Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Edna St. Vincent Millay. The home, known as the Millay House, hit the market in August 2021 for $4,990,000 but got a price cut this summer to $4,199,000.

More here

Cool Listings, Historic Homes, Upstate

Photo credit: Andrea B. Swenson

The Dutch farmhouse-style home at 35 Washington Spring Road in Snedens Landing–known as Ding Dong House because of a large bell that once adorned its rooftop–was built by John Sneden, whose family founded the ferry that serves the surrounding town of Palisades. Since then it has also been the residence of celebrities from Aaron Copland to Uma Thurman and Ethan Hawke. Built in 1750 with an addition that dates from 1860, this historic home is a peerless part of the celebrity-approved Hudson Valley enclave’s history and has been updated with 21st-century infrastructure. It’s now on the market for $6,500,000.

Find out more about this iconic Hudson Valley home

Historic Homes, Recent Sales, Tribeca

All photos courtesy of Eitan Gamliely for Sotheby’s International Realty

After nearly a decade on the market, a Tribeca home that has its own skybridge has sold for $24,000,000 in an off-market sale. The unusual listing included a townhouse at 9 Jay Street and a separate loft condo at 67 Hudson Street, connected by the famed footbridge suspended over Staple Street. The deal sets a new record for the highest per square foot sale for a townhouse in the neighborhood.

Find out more

Cool Listings, Historic Homes, New Jersey

All images courtesy of Nettie of Architectural Media Services, unless otherwise noted

A home that is one part of the sprawling New Jersey estate built by the Straus Family, the owners of Macy’s, is now available. Located in Red Bank at 310 Cooper Road, Cobble Close Farm is a 13-acre estate with French Norman-style buildings, including several residences. The estate was built in the 1920s by Herbert Nathan Straus and his wife Therese Kuhn Straus; Herbert’s father was Isidor Straus, the co-owner of Macy’s who died on the Titanic. A 4,500-square-foot co-op on the property recently hit the market for $2,645,000, which includes an additional apartment and shared ownership of the historic farm.

See more here

Cool Listings, Historic Homes, Upper East Side

Photo courtesy of The Corcoran Group

A mansion-sized 14-room duplex at 740 Park Avenue, a building considered to be Manhattan’s most luxurious residential address, is now on the market for $26,000,000. Built in 1929 by James T. Lee, grandfather of Jacqueline Bouvier (later Kennedy Onassis), who lived there as a girl, the Art Deco building was designed by Rosario Candela. One of its first notable residents was John D. Rockefeller, Jr., who resided in a duplex similar to the one featured here.

Step inside one of the city’s grandest homes

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS

Thank you, your sign-up request was successful!
This email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Please provide a valid email address.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.