Historic Homes

Cool Listings, Historic Homes, Tribeca

Just about three years ago, 6sqft reported that one of Tribeca‘s more unusual architectural offerings, the 8,170-square-foot townhouse at 9 Jay Street that includes the famous Staple Street Skybridge, was for sale. The building, the pedestrian skybridge and loft condo it connects to–once the home and studio of iconic 1980s fashion designer Zoran Ladicorbic–were asking $50 million. Now, the quirky collection is back on the market with a hefty $15 million price chop, asking $35 million. The new ask comes with 4,080 square feet of air rights, and from the looks of the building’s wide open interiors, the options for a new buyer are many.

What’s inside?

Cool Listings, Historic Homes, Upper West Side 

Here’s a chance rent a sprawling space in the famous Ansonia on the Upper West Side for $21,000 a month. The 2,900-square-foot pad offers stunning views from east, south, and west exposures. The capacious co-op is the result of combining three units that formed their own wing of the building, representing the largest original layout ever designed by the building’s architect, Duboy of Graves and Duboy. The apartment was listed for sale in back in 2015 for $12M.

Take the tour

Celebrities, Historic Homes, Recent Sales, Upper East Side

The six-story Beaux-Arts mansion at 4 East 74th Street on the Upper East Side has been home to several prominent occupants throughout history from President Grover Cleveland’s law partner to artist Marc Chagall; Michael Jackson rented the house the ’90s, and it served as the exterior of Nate Archibald’s residence in “Gossip Girl.” According to The New York Times and property records, the 16-room mansion sold in October for nearly $32 million.

Have a last look

Cool Listings, Historic Homes, Park Slope

Situated on an elegant Park Slope corner lot where Sixth Avenue meets Garfield Place, the house at 267 Sixth Avenue has a rare and unusual history. Built in the 1870s, the building is the former home of the Swedish American Athletic Club. In its current incarnation, the 7,200 square-foot house is comprised of a 5,400-square foot owner’s triplex over a 1,800-square foot three-bedroom rental apartment–asking $5.999 million. In its athletic club days, the building featured a 90-foot ballroom, a billiard room, a bowling alley and a lounge with a 15-foot cocktail bar. The bar remains intact and the bowling alley (not pictured, unfortunately) lives partially unaltered on the home’s lowest level.

Take the grand tour

Cool Listings, Crown Heights, Historic Homes

The historic Elkins House at 1375 Dean Street, an 1850s wood-frame home in Crown Heights, is officially the neighborhood’s oldest house–and  you can rent one of its duplex units from January to April of 2019 for $9,250 a month. The landmarked wood-frame building has been completely renovated with 2,033 square feet of living space including five  bedrooms (two with private balconies) and a private top-floor deck. The home’s newly-converted condos were last seen on the market last spring, with two duplex units–including this one–asking $2.3 and $2.7 million.

Take a tour

Cool Listings, Historic Homes, New Jersey

Here in NYC, if you want skyline views, you’re going to have to cough up some serious dough. But just 45 minutes away, in South Orange, New Jersey, you can get that, plus an entire historic mansion sitting on more than two acres, for less than $600,000 (h/t CIRCA). That is if the bidding doesn’t get too out of control. This 11,000-square-foot Georgian-style home is headed to auction on November 18th and the minimum bid is set at $575,000. The winner will be living in Gilded Age glamour, as the 1924 home retains five ornate fireplaces, coffered ceilings, marble Corinthian columns, and an entire ballroom.

See inside

Cool Listings, Historic Homes, Upper West Side 

With its crimson brick facade, stepped gables, and graceful archways, this four-story 1886 townhouse at 383 West End Avenue is one in a row of eight. It’s a legal two-family dwelling (so there’s rental income potential) currently being used as a single-family home. The building’s stained glass transoms, original fireplaces, and winding staircase reflect the artistry and Victorian stylings of designer Frederick B. White. Currently asking $4.795 million, it’s a house in one of the city’s most beloved neighborhoods with plenty of room for living, and it rings in at far less than the average luxury condominium, where you probably wouldn’t even get a sunken garden and a magical third-floor terrace.

Gorgeous townhouse tour, this way

Cool Listings, Historic Homes, Upper East Side

Known as the Sherman Fairchild Mansion, the modern-fronted townhouse at 17 East 65th Street is one of those New York City sights that might cause you to do a double-take in the middle of an otherwise sedate Upper East Side sidewalk. The current façade of this five-story home was designed by William Hamby and George Nelson in 1940 for aviation pioneer/inventor Sherman Fairchild. Well-known architect Michael Graves was commissioned to design yet another facade for the home in 1979, but that version was never built. The 25-foot-wide, 9,440 square-foot modern townhouse has been on and off the market since 2014, beginning last year at $40 million. Now, this unique townhouse has engineered yet another re-debut with a discount, asking $35M.

Have another look inside

Cool Listings, Historic Homes, Interiors, Park Slope

Even in a neighborhood of grand and spectacular homes, 108 8th Avenue is a standout. The Park Slope townhouse has the scale and level of stunning historic detail that is, as the listing boasts, rarely found in a private home. It is also quietly possessed of  21st-century luxuries like central air and meticulously tended outdoor spaces, making it an even rarer gem that’s now on the market for the first time in decades, asking $$8.8 million. Built in 1900, this limestone-clad mansion has a wealth of historic details like filigreed mahogany woodwork, original wood floors, delicately carved mantels and stained glass from world-renowned artists. Martin Scorcese’s “The Age of Innocence” and HBO’s “Boardwalk Empire” have made use of this opulent home to capture the essence of gracious living from a bygone era.

Take the grand tour

Greenwich Village, Historic Homes, History

Photo of 14 West 10th Street via Wikimedia; Photo of Mark Twain via Wikimedia

Despite its picturesque exterior, the building at 14 West 10th Street in Greenwich Village has a not-so-cute history. Since being constructed in the 1850s near the start of the Civil War, 22 people have died in the home, referred to as the House of Death. And as the New York Post reported, some of their spirits allegedly have never left. Residents have reported sightings of the spirit of Samuel Clemens aka Mark Twain, who lived at the building between 1900 and 1901, and other bone-chilling ghosts who have haunted the Greenwich Village block for over a century.

More on the haunted home here

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