Historic Homes

Cool Listings, Hamptons, Historic Homes

Listing photos courtesy of The Corcoran Group

In Sag Harbor Village, this $3,250,000 house shares all the history of its neighborhood. It was built in 1792 but updated with a modern take on its 18th-century origins. Throughout you’ll find handcrafted millwork and ironwork, wide-plank oak floors, and shiplap ceiling with exposed wood beams. And it’s just steps to both Sag Harbor Cove and all the shops and restaurants along Main Street.

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Connecticut, Cool Listings, Historic Homes

Listing photos courtesy of Houlihan Lawrence

For the price of a not-huge Manhattan apartment, you can own this entire 17.5-acre farm in New Canaan, Connecticut, just one hour from NYC. The Extown Farmhouse was originally constructed circa 1776 in the Georgian vernacular style, and it retains much of its original character including structural timber framing, woodwork, floorboards, and fireplace mantels. Also on the property are a main barn with a silo, a three-bay garage, a restored farmhouse cottage, a wood shed, hobby house, chicken coop, turnkey shed, smoke house, large raised-bed vegetable garden, and a fruit orchard.

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Downtown Brooklyn, Historic Homes

Map data © 2020 Google

New York City has officially purchased the property at 227 Duffield Street, a 19th-century rowhouse in Downtown Brooklyn recently designated as a landmark for its ties to the abolitionist movement. The Landmarks Preservation Commission last month granted landmark status to the home, occupied by known abolitionists Harriet and Thomas Truesdell from 1851 to 1863, after years of advocacy and a threat by a developer to raze it and build a mixed-use building in its place. First Lady Chirlane McCray, who has been a vocal advocate for the preservation of the site, announced the purchase during Mayor Bill de Blasio’s briefing on Monday and said the deal ensures the property will be “protected and celebrated for a very long time.”

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Cool Listings, Historic Homes, West Village 

Listing photos courtesy of Douglas Elliman

Just by looking at this tiny brick house in the West Village, you get the sense that it has a lot of history. Aside from its nearly 200-year-old lifespan (it was built in the 1830s), this is quite true. No. 34 Commerce Street abuts 77 Bedford Street, also known as the Isaac-Hendricks House, a wooden house built in 1799 and thereby the oldest house in the Village. The house on Commerce Street was owned by the Hendricks family, too, and was originally built as a wagonshed. After several decades of use as a factory, it was altered to a residence in the 1920s. It’s now on the market for the first time in 20 years, asking $4,750,000.

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Connecticut, Cool Listings, Historic Homes

All photos courtesy of Brown Harris Stevens

A charming 18th-century farmstead in Connecticut’s Fairfield County is on the market for $1,150,000. Located on two private acres at 289 Nod Hill Road in Wilton, the property includes a four-bedroom main house, a barn, four additional detached structures, and a chicken coop. Built in 1790, the cozy home boasts some original details, including the historic hearth in the “keeping” room.

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Brooklyn Heights, Cool Listings, Historic Homes

All photos by Evan Joseph courtesy of The Corcoran Group

As Brownstoner first spotted, the Brooklyn Heights townhouse that was used for the exterior shots of the Castorini family’s home in the classic 1987 film Moonstruck has just come on the market. The interiors were not used in the movie, but boy are they big screen-worthy. There are early 19th-century details like hand-carved moldings, inlaid wooden floors, and marble fireplace mantles, as well as new old-looking features like beamed ceilings, luxe wallpapers, and vintage decor. Located at 19 Cranberry Street, the home is asking $12,850,000, and even has a private parking spot.

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Celebrities, Cool Listings, Hamptons, Historic Homes

Listing photos courtesy of Douglas Elliman

In 1705, this home was built for Nehemiah Whitman, great-grandfather to Walt Whitman. It’s also where the poet’s grandfather, Jesse Whitman, was born. And in 1881, according to Douglas Elliman, Walt Whitman himself visited the property, stopping at its private cemetery where he “composed a lament on the graves of his ancestors.” Since its construction, the Colonial has had only four owners, and after last selling in 1995, it’s now on the market for $750,000. Known as the Whitman-Rome house, it retains tons of original details like pine-floorboards, ceiling beams, wooden doors, and four fireplaces.

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Cool Listings, Financial District, Historic Homes

All photos courtesy of Anthony Puopolo for Douglas Elliman

Here’s an opportunity to influence the future of one of New York City’s oldest streets. Goldman Properties is selling three of its mixed-use buildings located on Stone Street in the Financial District for $20.75 million. As the city’s first paved street in New York, Stone Street’s history dates back to the middle of the 1600s and today remains a car-free cobblestone-lined walkway with an outdoor dining scene that predates the pandemic. The portfolio includes three buildings with a total of ten free-market two-bedroom and three-bedroom loft rentals and three operating restaurants.

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Cool Listings, Historic Homes, Soho

 All photos courtesy of Douglas Elliman

A 19th-century custom-designed Soho building once owned by William Waldorf Astor is on the market for $17 million. Located at 435 Broome Street, the Victorian Gothic building was built in 1873 by famed architect William Appleton Potter and features five tall loft stories framed by exterior cast-iron colonnettes and capitals. As the listing describes, the property, located between Broadway and Crosby Street, is the “perfect multi-functioning property for retail, office, or residential mixed-use.”

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Historic Homes, Landmarks Preservation Commission, Washington Heights

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. (1937). Riverside Drive, no. 857, at 159th Street, Manhattan, courtesy of the New York Public Library.

Preservationists and local politicians are pushing the city to reverse their decision to not landmark a historic home with abolitionist history in Washington Heights. The two-story wood-frame home at 857 Riverside Drive in Upper Manhattan was owned by anti-slavery activist Dennis Harris who may have also been an Underground Railroad conductor. Despite a demolition permit filed by the current owner, the Landmarks Preservation Commission last November still rejected landmark status for the home because of the architectural alterations made to the original structure.

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