From Our Partners

From Our Partners

The top 20 most congested cities when it comes to traffic

By Metro New York, Wed, February 22, 2017

Rush hour traffic is as predictable as the sun setting at night for New Yorkers, but drivers might be shocked to find out how many hours tick away while they’re stuck behind the wheel. On average, New York City drivers spend 89 hours a year in traffic, making it the third most congested city in the world, according to a recent global traffic study by INRIX. Los Angeles earned bragging rights as the most congested city on the planet, with drivers spending an average of 104 hours a year in traffic. Coming in at number two was Moscow, with 91 hours spent in traffic annually.

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From Our Partners

Square Roots first broke ground by financing and mentoring local entrepreneurs who are growing tasty, nutritious greens in, of all places, a Brooklyn parking lot. Now it’s taking things a step further—right to your New York City office. The new “Farm to Local, by Square Roots” initiative delivers snack-size bags of salad greens to workplaces. It already has subscribers at Vice Media and Kickstarter, said Square Roots CEO and co-founder Tobias Peggs. “Your farmer will literally come to your desk and drop off same-day-harvested greens,” he said.

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From Our Partners

Here are the world’s most expensive cities for renters

By Metro New York, Fri, February 17, 2017

We all know big-city living can be expensive, but the proof is definitely in the rent check. According to Nested’s newly released “2017 Rental Index,” three of the world’s most expensive cities to rent in are found right here in the U.S. San Francisco, New York and Boston renters pay more per square foot than their fellow renters around the globe, the London-based online realtor found. Washington, D.C., and Seattle also made the global Top 10.

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Art, From Our Partners

On the third floor of an unassuming warehouse building in Long Island City is a cavern of creativity. Welcome to Materials for the Arts, which gathers discarded items from businesses and individuals from across the five boroughs and donates them to public schools, nonprofits and artists. MFTA’s 35,000-square-foot warehouse is a treasure trove, stuffed with bolts of fabric, stacks of paint, spools of thread, instrument cases, books, frames, thread, zippers, office and classroom supplies, glassware and mannequin parts.

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From Our Partners

CityHealth on Wednesday released its first official ratings of city government policies that affect their residents’ health, and New York ranked first among the nation’s 40 largest cities. CityHealth, a nonprofit advisory organization, awarded gold, silver and bronze medals to the cities on the basis of nine categories of health-oriented public policies. New York City earned eight gold medals (one for overall performance), which is two more than Boston, Los Angeles and Washington—the country’s next best for how well the policies keep citizens healthy.

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From Our Partners

The hundreds of backpacks now on display at The New School don’t belong to students there. Many of their owners are not even wondering what became of the mementos, clothes and other items small and light enough to fit inside them—some of them are children’s bookbags. This wall of backpacks that reaches all the way to the ceiling at the Sheila C. Johnson Design Center tells the story of journey that will never be finished. They belonged to migrants who had made the dangerous illegal crossing into the U.S. across the Mexican border, only to perish during their four-day trek across Arizona’s Sonoran Desert. Part of the exhibit involves walking across a video projection of what artist Richard Barnes calls “the debris field” of trash and personal belongings that line their path.

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From Our Partners

A French-style McDonald’s debuts in Chelsea

By Metro New York, Mon, February 13, 2017

America may have started the fast-food chain restaurant, but France perfected it. McDonald’s has been testing a new kind of restaurant design overseas, and today debuted the first U.S. restaurant based on the concept at 809 Sixth Ave. The French-style McDonald’s has three distinctive features: its architecture, concierges and a standalone McCafe with an expanded pastry collection.

“We really invested here to try to disrupt one of the hardest places to do business and one of the most rewarding,” says PJ Fonseca, the franchisee who owns the new Chelsea restaurant. “We’re changing the culture to make it customer-facing.”

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From Our Partners

Building superintendents union wants to hire more women

By Metro New York, Fri, February 10, 2017

Carmen La Luz has painted, plumbed and performed assorted odd jobs from Chelsea to the Bronx for 40 years. On the brink of her 87th birthday, she can look back on her life as a pioneer, a woman in what had traditionally been a man’s job: a building superintendent.

Female supers in New York City are about as rare today as they were when La Luz first landed in the U.S. in the ‘60s. But that might be changing. As the city experiences a construction boom of new residential buildings, the demand for superintendents grows. And building owners expect a higher level of professionalism in the people they hire to perform the jobs.

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From Our Partners

Love snow and money? NYC needs snow laborers

By Metro New York, Thu, February 9, 2017

Now that it seems like winter is rearing its ugly head in New York, the city is looking for some extra help to keep its residents safe. As the white stuff piled up around the five boroughs Thursday morning, the Department of Sanitation  shared on its Twitter account a posting calling for temporary snow laborers.

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From Our Partners

On the list of best U.S. cities to live, NYC ranks 80th

By Metro New York, Wed, February 8, 2017

There are a lot of great cities in the U.S., but when you factor in value, jobs, quality of life and desirability, some are better than others. U.S. News & World Report analyzed the 100 most populous metro areas in the country to find the best places to live, and the rankings might surprise you. New York City, known as a “relentless metropolis” of dream-driven residents, ranked 80th.

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From Our Partners

Times Square is giving a Valentine to all the immigrants of New York City. A new heart-shaped sculpture called “We Were Strangers Once Too” will be unveiled today on Duffy Square, which won the Times Square Alliance’s ninth annual heart-themed design competition for Valentine’s Day. It’s made up of 33 rods ringed in red and pink bands showing the number of immigrants from over 100 countries who call NYC home—out of a city of 8.25 million, 3.13 million residents were born in another country, according to 2015’s American Community Survey.

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From Our Partners

John Jeffries is considered America’s first weatherman

By Metro New York, Mon, February 6, 2017

Nowadays, in this age of social media and hyper-mass-marketing, it seems there’s a “National “Day” for everything: sunglasses, hot dogs, ice cream, etc. Yesterday was National Weatherpersons’ Day, and it’s a fun day to ponder the incredible strides we’ve made in our still-young science of meteorology. Started in the ‘90s, the day commemorates American surgeon and scientist John Jeffries (1745-1819), a native Bostonian of Revolutionary times, who is credited with taking America’s first daily weather observations starting in 1774.

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From Our Partners

New Yorkers hoping to bring two breedable pandas from China to Central Park have reached out to President Donald Trump’s older sons, Donald Jr. and Eric, for help. The idea is a stretch, though the president did rebuild Wollman Rink near the Central Park Zoo in the 1980s for half the cost the city was paying, after six years of delays. “What I’d say to Eric is, ‘You’d be doing for the panda project what your father did with the Wollman Rink. Can you build a panda facility that follows in the footsteps of your father?’” John Catsimatidis told the Post.

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From Our Partners

What would a day without a Yemeni look like? That’s what New York will find out when 1,000 Yemeni grocery stores close their doors on Thursday in protest of President Trump’s travel ban on immigrants from seven Muslim-majority countries.

From noon until 8 p.m., Yemeni-owned and run bodegas and groceries across the five boroughs will demonstrate “a public show of the vital role these grocers and their families play in New York’s economic and social fabric and, during this period, grocery store owners will spend time with their families and loved ones to support each other; many of these families have been directly affected by the ban,” according to organizers.

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From Our Partners, Transportation

Environmentally friendly technology is becoming more popular among developers, because of global warming. That is the case of Mexican entrepreneur Alberto González who recently came up with a startup dubbed Greencode. He created the so-called Urban GC1, the world’s first bike made of recycled paper. According to the developer, this bicycle is cheaper than average urban bikes, is resilient and you don’t have to worry if it gets wet.

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From Our Partners

As promised, President Donald Trump issued an executive order January 20, just hours after taking the oath of office, that began the process of appealing the Affordable Care Act. Repeal will leave an estimated 18 million uninsured in the first plan year following repeal, then 32 million by 2026, according to official estimates, but the true impact will vary state to state. To find out which states would suffer most, WalletHub analyzed the expected growth in uninsured populations, the presence of Planned Parenthood funding, the potential for lost jobs and economic impact, the growth in uncompensated care costs and the share of insured young adults across all 50 states plus the District of Columbia.

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From Our Partners

The Lowline Lab underground park is closing February 26th

By Metro New York, Mon, January 30, 2017

lowline, James Ramsey, Dan Barasch, underground park, Entrance to the Lowline, lowline renderings, raad architecture

Underneath Essex Street on Manhattan’s Lower East Side, an experiment in the future of urban development has flourished. The world’s first underground park, the Lowline Lab, opened in October 2015 after a successful Kickstarter, offering an urban oasis for visitors while giving researchers unprecedented data on channeling sunlight underground to create green space where no one had thought it could exist before. But at the end of February, it’s closing to make way for the usual kind of urban development.

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From Our Partners

nily rozic nyc assemblywoman

With Donald Trump taking executive actions to make good on his campaign promise to build a wall between the U.S. and Mexico, one New York legislator has proposed a pushback. Assemblywoman Nily Rozic, who represents eastern Queens, introduced a bill on Thursday that would ban the state from doing business with companies involved in building the border wall.

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From Our Partners, real estate trends

Are co-living communities the future of NYC real estate?

By Metro New York, Thu, January 26, 2017

Photo: Bess Adler

In the 1960s, groups of hippies fled from cities to live on communes in the country. Now there’s a growing movement of communal living right here in New York City. “I feel the biggest challenge in our world today is we’re not speaking to each other,” said Ryan Fix, who started 25 communal living sites in New York City and a lab in France that studies co-living. “If we’re able to curate a group from all walks of life, this will be hugely transformative for the world.”

In the last couple of years in New York City, a system called “co-living” has taken off, with a number of companies converting office buildings and townhomes into communal living hubs where former strangers can live together, share meals, attend movie nights and do yoga side-by-side. Some real estate professionals are skeptical, while others say it’s too soon to know if co-living has a future, but it’s a model that seems to fulfill a human need an apartment listed on Craigslist could never.

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From Our Partners

Hart Island, Hart Island Project, Melinda Hunt, mass burials, NYC cemetery

© 2010 Melinda Hunt/The Hart Island Project

Relatives of people buried at a New York City island that serves as the largest mass grave in the United States will have increased access to the cemetery under a modified lawsuit settlement announced on Tuesday. Hart Island, a mile-long strip of land in the Long Island Sound that sits at the eastern edge of the Bronx, has housed the cemetery for people who cannot afford burials or for unclaimed bodies since the late 1800s. Around 1 million men, women and children have been interred at the island in unmarked graves.

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