Features

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City Living, Features, NYC Guides, Restaurants, Top Stories

70 NYC restaurants with heaters for outdoor dining

By Dana Schulz, Thu, October 15, 2020

Photo of Bubby’s Tribeca, courtesy of Bubby’s

Though indoor dining is permitted at 25-percent capacity in New York City, a lot of people still don’t feel 100-percent comfortable with the idea. Luckily, the city made its outdoor dining program permanent and year-round and gave restaurants the go-ahead to install outdoor heat lamps. If you’re looking for one of these spots to dine al fresco without shivering, we’ve begun a running list throughout the city. Know of another spot? Let us know in the comments!

Check out the full list here

Featured Story

Events, Features, holidays

Photo of pumpkin-headed scarecrows courtesy of NYBG

Although it’s already been a scary year, there are still ways to have some old-school spooky fun in New York City this Halloween. Sadly, popular events like the Village Halloween Parade and the Tompkins Square Dog Halloween Parade have been canceled and traditional trick-or-treating has been deemed a high-risk activity because of the coronavirus pandemic. But there are a number of fall-friendly, socially distanced events still taking place across the city, like a Día de Los Muertos celebration at Green-Wood Cemetery, virtual ghost story readings from the Merchant’s House Museum (considered Manhattan’s most haunted house), and eerie hayrides and pumpkin picking at the Queens County Farm Museum.

Get the spooky scoop

Featured Story

Cool Listings, Features, real estate trends

With the impending cool weather likely to limit the hours spent at city parks (which proved to be so necessary this summer) and the current health crisis still raging, New Yorkers will have to find creative ways to get some fresh air safely this fall and winter. For those looking for some outdoor space without having to leave home, we’re rounding up the best New York City apartments with outside amenities currently available to rent for $5,000/month and under, whether it’s in the form of a private garden, balconies, or a shared roof deck.

See the full list

Featured Story

Features, GVSHP, History

“Bar Scene” Village Preservation (GVSHP) Image Archive

Nonprofit advocacy and educational organization Village Preservation is well known for many things, one of which is its historic image archive. Their newest addition is the Jean Polacheck Collection, which dates largely from the 1940s through the mid-1950s, and includes scenes of Washington Square Park, the interior of clubs and restaurants, and other NYC street scenes. Ahead, step back in time with a sneak peek of some of these wonderfully illustrative photos and learn about the woman behind them.

See more here

Featured Story

City Living, Features

79th street boat basin, upper west side, houseboats

Photo of the 79th Street Boat Basin by Jim Henderson on Wikimedia

In Amsterdam, houseboats are considered an affordable way to live in the center of the city. They’re also popular in other global cities, from London’s Little Venice to waterfront neighborhoods in Vancouver, Los Angeles, and Sydney. So why doesn’t New York City—with its 578 miles of coastline—have a thriving houseboat community, too? While it’s impossible to know for certain, recent estimates for Manhattan suggest that year-round houseboat residents or “liveaboards” may now number fewer than 50.

More on houseboat living and how to do it yourself

Featured Story

Features, Policy

A guide to voting in the 2020 election in NYC

By Dana Schulz, Mon, October 5, 2020

Photo by Tiffany Tertipes on Unsplash

If you’re reading this post, you probably don’t need a reminder to get out there and vote for the presidential election on November 3. But you might have some questions about how things are working this year, with the pandemic coming into play. Luckily for New York City residents, voting is easy and safe, and we’ve compiled a guide with everything you need to know about deadlines, voting by mail, and voting in person.

Read more

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Events, Features, Restaurants

8 spots to celebrate Oktoberfest 2020 in NYC

By Devin Gannon, Thu, October 1, 2020

Photo by Brett Sayles on Pexels

Although the world’s biggest Oktoberfest festival in Munich won’t take place this year because of the coronavirus pandemic, there are still ways to celebrate Bavarian culture locally this month. Biergartens and beer halls across New York City are serving up traditional biers and brats, decking out their spaces with festive decorations, and putting on live music. And while indoor dining can officially resume as of this week, most restaurants also have spacious outdoor patios and gardens, as well as take-out and delivery options.

See the full list

Featured Story

City Living, Features, Restaurants

Everything you need to know about indoor dining in NYC

By Dana Schulz, Tue, September 29, 2020

Photo by Fábio Alves on Unsplash

After being shut down for more than six months, indoor dining in New York City returns tomorrow. The biggest difference is that restaurants can only operate at 25-percent capacity, but there is also a long list from the state of rules and regulations. Plus, Governor Cuomo has instituted a compliance component that will deploy 400 enforcement personnel and allow New Yorkers to fill out online complaint forms. If you’re thinking about partaking in indoor dining, we’ve put together a guide that outlines everything you need to know.

All the info

Featured Story

Features, NYC Guides, Upstate

The 7 best places to see fall foliage outside NYC

By Rebecca Fishbein, Mon, September 28, 2020

A downside to living in a thriving city is that air pollution makes for poor fall foliage, though some spots in town—Wave Hill, Pelham Bay Park—still boast colorful leaves at the end of October. But if you take a short trip outside the city limits, you can see some beautiful autumn colors, all within a day’s drive. Sadly, the best fall foliage sightseeing trip is no more—Amtrak retired its glass-domed Adirondack train in 2018. But there are other spots to take in the season; here are our seven favorites.

Check out all the spots

Featured Story

Features, History, Midtown, Transportation

Grand Central, Track 61, secret track, elevator, FDR

Image © Emily Nonko for 6sqft

The iconic Grand Central Terminal is a building with more than a few secrets. Constructed in 1913 with the wealth of the Vanderbilt family, there was a lavish private office (now known as The Campbell Apartment), glass catwalks, a hidden spiral staircase, and even artists’ studios on an upper floor. One of the most infamous secrets of the terminal, however, was a secret track used specifically for a president to access one of the most famous hotels in the world. Known as Track 61, it leads to a special platform that was never used or intended to be used in regular passenger service—it just happened to be in the right place.

Keep reading about Grand Central’s secret track

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